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Thread: Seam Tape Glue

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    Member BrowningLeverAction's Avatar
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    Default Seam Tape Glue

    I have an older Legacy Pro Advantage (gray with red stripe). I'm trying to limp it along for another year or two until I can afford a shiny new boat. The seam tape is starting to peel up around the edges. I have used Clifton glue in the past to apply patches, but is there another, thinner type of glue that would be good to stick the tape back down? I am envisioning painting it on the tube under the tape and then smoothing it out, kind of like wallpapering. It would not be a "structural" repair.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrowningLeverAction View Post
    I have an older Legacy Pro Advantage (gray with red stripe). I'm trying to limp it along for another year or two until I can afford a shiny new boat. The seam tape is starting to peel up around the edges. I have used Clifton glue in the past to apply patches, but is there another, thinner type of glue that would be good to stick the tape back down? I am envisioning painting it on the tube under the tape and then smoothing it out, kind of like wallpapering. It would not be a "structural" repair.
    If not integral to 'structure'...

    Couple of things here:

    What seams are you trying to address? Are you talking seam-tape over miters on tube or the outer & inner floor seam-tapes/fabrics that affix the floor to tubes?

    Best fix is hard to say without knowing the repair project being assessed here.

    If it is on tube miters taping (w/ any leakage)... simply sticking it back down will only be a cosmetic result unless done properly.

    Floor taping/fabric lines 'can' be time consuming both cosmetically and functionally if there is in fact something structural as well going on there.

    Outside on the bottom of the floor generally indicates age and what impacts, abrasions, scratches, etc. the bottom.

    Inside the boat can tell a tale of boat on last legs, not put together good enough from factory... or both with the 'add-age' of aging adhesives plus coatings throughout the whole boat.

    In your case a good clean, surface-prep, primer or adhesive, and fabric or a coating is likely in order to make 'er right before you get another boat.

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    Member BrowningLeverAction's Avatar
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    This repair would be on the tape around the inside of the tube, inside the boat opposite from the outer belt line. The boat used to be an outfitter's raft and so was probably ridden hard and put away in the sun. The edges of the tape are starting to curl up. By a "coating", do you mean painting a glue on the tape?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrowningLeverAction View Post
    This repair would be on the tape around the inside of the tube, inside the boat opposite from the outer belt line. The boat used to be an outfitter's raft and so was probably ridden hard and put away in the sun. The edges of the tape are starting to curl up. By a "coating", do you mean painting a glue on the tape?

    So if I'm reading this right -- it is seam-'tape' over miter sections on the tube and not a line involving the floor... is this correct?

    If so -- here is a picture of a very good solution.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Member BrowningLeverAction's Avatar
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    That's correct, no floor section involved. That looks like a good technique. What material is that?

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    Probably worth a look see if you are in Anchorage... kinda like baking a cake or making a batch of cookies... looks good, satisfies the taste-buds... yet a bit more involved to get 100% effective, consistent, & lasting results. Hard to beat a fine recipe having the right cook in the kitchen.

    Whatever you do - do NOT fall for all the easy-application relatively inexpensive 'rubber paints' or sealants hype. None of them will give lasting, good looking repair results.

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