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Thread: your take on electronic ear protectors

  1. #1
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    Default your take on electronic ear protectors

    need your help fellas, have used a pro-ear once that a friend had.....it worked but seemed pretty top heavy. what is a good pair without the weight or is that possible? there is alot of brands out there and am just lost....of course the question is when to not make an investment as money is "always" and object of concern.

    appreciate any input
    regards,

  2. #2

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    I have the peltor tac-6. Nice unit. For the really loud stuff I like to wear plugs under the muffs. Never used them in the field, only at the range.

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    take that back it was the peltor 6 that I tried......googled a couple of sites, went to Amazon, came on to the Pro-Ears Gold Slim, pondered and filled in the blanks, checked the internet again, deliberated the cost, left the home came back sat down for a moment and just like that "hit" the buy button! What did I just do?....major coin. oh well......it is just money, don't have enough ever but so it goes.....

  4. #4

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    i use a combo of the standard ear muffs with the earplugs on the range and the electronic ear plugs that allow people to speak to you in the field for shooting .. to save what is left of my hearing as it is ..

  5. #5

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    Has anyone talked to an audiologist about them?

  6. #6
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default surefire?

    Has anyone tried these? Ive got a pair on order. For 12.95 they are worth a try.

    http://www.surefire.com/EP3-Sonic-Defenders
    I'm going to ctrl-alt-delete you so hard your mama's computer is going to reboot.

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    I have the Peltor's. For $59.99 at Cabela's they are very hard to beat. I like the amplification to assist in normal conversation and range instructions.

    The very expensive Pro ears are probably a better product but I can outfit myself, my wife and both kids with 4 Peltor's for the price of 1 Pro Ears.

    The Peltor's clip all sound when the decibel level is reached. The Pro Ears just clip the loud sound and let the other sounds come through, no big deal to me.

  8. #8
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    one of the features the Pro-Ears will provide for me is a jack for my Ipod....I boat frequently in the spring till fall, use them on my KQ750. I will soon find out exactly if the cost is worth the buy. Walkers put out a very spendy ear set....don't know if he is selling his name or if the product is really that good.

    Marshall, my buddy from Ruby had a pair he brought up where I live here last fall and we done some scope work on his rifle here and his Peltors did well cept if I recall it was rather top heavy. Maybe they all are but I do recall his cuttin out the blast quite well.

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    I picked up a set of Caldwell EMax for about $29 locally.
    So far I've only tried them around the house for a couple of days, but they seem to work. Snap my finger & they shut down, but with normal sounds good amplification. Comfortable.
    We'll see how they do at the range...
    Vance in AK.

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    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  10. #10
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
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    Default Ears

    I have a set of Remington's and don't like them at all. They are supposed to cut out sound to a certain decibel but don't shut down to nothing. It is really annoying on the skeet field when someone in the next field is shooting and they don't muffle any of the noise. Have called Remington, which is really Radians and they said send them back. I have once already and will again. They are not the cheapest but I suppose the name is $$. They are ready for the "seldom" used pile.

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    I have been using Peltor Tactical 6S for a few years now. I used them at the range and also when hunting, although they aren't rainproof. When raining, I just use earplugs I carry in my pockets just before firing my rifle when hunting. I just carry the earmuffs over my head on my cap (headband around the back of my head), and move them down over my ears when ready to shoot.

    LIKES
    -Lightweight
    -Slim enough not to interfere with the rifle stock
    -Do an excellent job stopping noise

    DISLIKES
    -Difficult to replace the batteries, specially when cold outdoors
    -Trap a lot of moisture inside (all do, I imagine)
    -Not rainproof
    -The volume controls can easily be moved from OFF to ON by accident without one's knowledge

  12. #12
    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    After nearly 10 years on the pair of Peltors I paid nearly 200.00 bucks (I still have) I plainly tell you to save your money and get a pair of plugs that are molded inside your ears. They work and do what the eletronics muffs wish they could. Save your money.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default Yes

    Quote Originally Posted by byrd_hntr View Post
    Has anyone tried these? Ive got a pair on order. For 12.95 they are worth a try.

    http://www.surefire.com/EP3-Sonic-Defenders
    I use these for tactical rifle & shotgun shooting. It is unnatural to use muffs when working with long guns. These plugs work great for that.

    However, they do NOT attenuate enough noise for high power rifle and the really high decibel stuff. If you are shooting under a roof at the range where you get noise concentration due to echo, these are not a good choice.

    My electronic muffs are low-profile "Radians" and they are extremely light and compact. I got them through a company discount for about $30. You can hardly tell the difference between these and low-profile standard muffs as far as weight and they are more compact than most standard muffs. I've been using them for at least 5-6 years and I use them a lot. The batteries last a very long time. I probably change them about once per year (6 each AAA, 3 in each side). They will let you hear the guys whispering on the adjacent range and still knock off the loudest report without fail.

    Standard muffs are for the garage when the 9-inch grinder comes out.
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  14. #14
    Member AlpineEarl's Avatar
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    Default

    I wore a set of peltor 6s's and a set of Com-tac II's for a number of years. I've also used the surefire sonic defenders. The Peltors are the way to go. I used them in the Army and wear them almost every day in my civilian job. Both were issued, so I did not pay for them but I can tell you 6s's are about 70 bucks and the Com-tacs $200. Unless you need them for radio communication the 6s's will do. They have saved my ears from normal gunfire to rockets, mortars and IED's so I swear by them. Plus you can hear what's going on around you. They make the range a safer place.
    the surefire defenders work ok for a few rounds but my ears begin to hurt and ring after a short time.
    the com-tacs are more comfortable than the 6s's but unless you wear them for 8+ hours a day the 6s's are good.
    The 6s's can build up some condensation if you sweat in them a lot, so be sure to dry them out before putting them away or they will corrode.

  15. #15
    Member JoeJ's Avatar
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    Default

    This is just my experience, but I’ve found the electronic muffs to work quite well. I got a pair when they were relatively new to the market and expensive. On the range they’re great, as you can hear normal conversation and the muzzle report is cut out. My pair is the Silencio RSX-87 and they are old, bulky and a little on the heavy side compared to the “modern” electronic muffs. I decided I would go with plugs for hunting and overall revolver action when in the field and an “opportunity” arises to kill something legally with a “large bore”. I think I wasted $90.00 I went with EAR Inc. and got their insta-mold with the filter, so I could hear conversations better than the “regular” insta-mold. I keep them in my vehicle and will only use them when I forget my muffs. The revolver report on a 454, 475 and the 500’s seem very loud to me when I’m shooting and if a guy next to me caps one off while wearing the insta-mold, I’ll flinch big time. I’ll actually “jump” if the shot is totally unexpected. At first I thought I had them in wrong but after visiting with the individual who made them up and being assured I had them in right and after being advised the muzzle report would only seem louder than muffs, I’m comfortable that my hearing is being protected while wearing these plugs. The muzzle report still seems 10X’s louder to me with these plugs than when wearing muffs. One has to get use to the perceived noise difference I guess. I think some of the perceived noise difference may be because the muffs cover your skull around the ear canal, whereas the plugs don’t cover that area and allow the concussion waves to maybe affect us – just a guess on my part. My experience with these plugs scared me away from spending good money on the electronic hearing systems that look like hearing aids and on paper, they look like the ultimate hearing protection to have while hunting and at the range if you want the very best in both sound amplification and suppression in one very small package. I think when my pair of electronic muffs quit on me; I’ll just get a new pair in the $60 to $100 range.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    To add one more item... I don't use anything while hunting. The discharge of a single shot in the woods while your adrenaline is pumping will have no affect on your hearing. You won't even notice the shot. Wandering around in the woods with hearing protection in would be a bad thing.
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  17. #17
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    When it comes to noise at the level of a rifle or revolver muzzle report permanent damage is done to your hearing with every shot taken and it has an accumulative effect. Some will suffer the effects sooner rather than later depending upon the frequency and loudness of the blast. You can read up on this via internet articles such as this one:
    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hea...N=risk-factors

    Those of us born in the early 1940's or earlier are now paying the piper for not being proper informed of the harmful effects of loud noises or not giving a hoot if we did know.

  18. #18
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Repeated exposure can certainly damage hearing. But I repeat, a single rifle shot in the woods during hunting season will not cause hearing damage. If you are duck or small game hunting where you are taking repeated shots or have multiple people taking repeated shots, then you should have hearing protection. But a single rifle shot every September will not cause problems. Even if you did it every September for 60 years, that is only 60 exposures. It takes many hundreds and usually thousands of exposures to cause permanent damage. Damage is caused by cumulative exposures during a short time period, not singular exposures a year apart.
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  19. #19
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    But I repeat, a single rifle shot in the woods during hunting season will not cause hearing damage. . .

    Damage is caused by cumulative exposures during a short time period, not singular exposures a year apart.
    That's not what all the data on the subject says. JoeJ is 100% correct! Single, sharp. loud, quick sounds are worse for lasting damage than a constant prolonged sound of the same db because it is so underestimated by people. It does not need to cause pain, make your ears ring, or anything you can tell at the time to do damage that you will pay for later in life. True two exposures is worse than one but EVERY quick sound over a meager 100db does lasting damage and the fiddler doesn’t present the total bill for hearing the songs till we are in our late 40s or later.
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    My hearing is quite poor and I like to use the amplifying muffs especially when hunting pheasant so I can hear the bird flush. I have three sets of amplifying muff protectors:

    Walker Quad Power Muffs....amplify well, batteries too expensive and scarce, microphone on back side screw me up as I can't tell direction of sound and the control knob is too exposed allowing them to turn on in duffle etc....

    Peltor Tactical.....work very well but battery installation is a pain and control knob is too exposed.

    Howard Leight Impact....my favorite....AAA batteries easily installed....controll knob is easily used but recessed enough to prevent accidental activation.

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