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Thread: 7.4 L Volvo Penta

  1. #1

    Default 7.4 L Volvo Penta

    Does any one have one? Is is a good and reliable engine. How is the fuel consumption. I am looking at a 24 ft Seasport with this less that 600 hours on this engine. What do you think?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member bhollis's Avatar
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    I had one of these in a 26' Osprey I owned for around three years. Never had any significant problems with the engine, and fuel consumption wasn't too bad. Should be plenty of power for a 24' SeaSport. My guess is, that if well maintained, these engines can go for well over 1000 hours. So if the engine's in good shape, with 600 hours, it should still have plenty of life left in it.

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    Member jkb's Avatar
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    It's a 454 chevy block so it's internal parts are tried and true.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
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    Member Lone Wolf1's Avatar
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    Default I have one in a 28' Mayliner Contessa

    My 7.4L has just under 600 hours on it and is still running great. I've had it well-maintained by Noah's Marine (Andy), and he's the guy who originally installed the engine, so he really goes over everything well each year when I have him winterize it. As far as fuel, last season I burned around 7 GPH cruising around PWS. I usually keep it under 4000 rpm, and with my semi-displacement hull that'sabout 20 - 22 mph. I had some major work done last Fall that was really preventive maintenance, and had Andy install a fuel flow meter so I should be able to "tweak" the fuel consumption this season.
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by bhollis View Post
    I had one of these in a 26' Osprey I owned for around three years. Never had any significant problems with the engine, and fuel consumption wasn't too bad. Should be plenty of power for a 24' SeaSport. My guess is, that if well maintained, these engines can go for well over 1000 hours. So if the engine's in good shape, with 600 hours, it should still have plenty of life left in it.
    Or, they can go double that with the right owner and care. Or, 600 hours could be just about shot. It really comes down to the use and the care. I know the following is somewhat apples to oranges (same concept though), but I really baby my honda 45s (the previous owner did too) and they have nearly 1200 hours on them and still perform very well. I would take it to the shop, have a compression/leak down test performed, and have them check the oil pressure at a hot idle. If it passes all those things, its internals are working correctly and should be running for a long time. If not, it will be an oil burning dog that eats fuel (like my old 24 ' Sea Ray was with a 5.7) and requires you to work on it all the time. Either way, the money checking it out is well spent.....

  6. #6
    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    I've put 4500 hrs on a 454 w/ a heckuva lot of abuse. it was in front of a 1031 Hamilton jet. I would run from Cape St Elias to whittier non-stop at 3500 rpms, w/ the occasional cavitation to 6 to 8 grand! It still ran fine when I replaced it. The single most killer of marine engines is the risers. You can get a pin hole in them and leak water down your cylinders. This is the killer of marine engines. Just don't over heat your engine to much and keep and eye on those pesky risers and she'll last years. I once ran a 460 ford motor in front of the same jet for 5000 hours! I lost my jet bearing and it put all kinds of stress on my crank and it spun the bearings off it and clogged my oil pump pickup screen. I ran it 4 and a half hours from whittier to Cordova w/ zero oil pressure. It stunk to high heaven but I made it LOL. NO like I said these old big blocks are bullet proof the weak link----the risers

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    I've put 4500 hrs on a 454 w/ a heckuva lot of abuse. it was in front of a 1031 Hamilton jet. I would run from Cape St Elias to whittier non-stop at 3500 rpms, w/ the occasional cavitation to 6 to 8 grand! It still ran fine when I replaced it. The single most killer of marine engines is the risers. You can get a pin hole in them and leak water down your cylinders. This is the killer of marine engines. Just don't over heat your engine to much and keep and eye on those pesky risers and she'll last years. I once ran a 460 ford motor in front of the same jet for 5000 hours! I lost my jet bearing and it put all kinds of stress on my crank and it spun the bearings off it and clogged my oil pump pickup screen. I ran it 4 and a half hours from whittier to Cordova w/ zero oil pressure. It stunk to high heaven but I made it LOL. NO like I said these old big blocks are bullet proof the weak link----the risers
    Like I said, with the right owner they are going to last a long time. Your boats are a perfect example. My 460 in my 78 ford f250 went nearly 300,000 miles without issue and to be honest I rebuilt it because I restored the truck and wanted it to be a screamer.....And by the way it is But with that said, there is the other side of the coin too......and stuff that isn't taken care of just doesn't last especially in our hostile marine environment.

  8. #8
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    Its a good motor but thirsty. I had one in a 27' Uniflite Sportfish flybridge. There was another boat in town same model with a 351 that ran just fine. I might gather that a small block would be better in that 24'. Just make sure the boat is propped and run her at cruise below the rpms when the four barrels kick in.

    Sobie2

  9. #9
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    Default Rebuilt 454 (7.4 L) in my 27ft SeaSport

    My boat came out of Seattle area with a rebuilt from Merc Marine. It's the only way to get one of these 7.4 L engines now. They're no longer made. My engine has run great for the last 3 years and has about 600 hrs. I wouldn't have anyone but Andy at Noah's Marine take care of it. I'm expecting this engine to run for many years, BUT if I were to repower the only replacement now is the new 8.1 L.

    The 7.4 L is a powerful engine but you'll want all that power in difficult conditions. I think it's fine in a 24 ft SS. Carbureted vs. Fuel Injected makes a difference in how they run and in fuel economy. Mine is carbureted and gives me about 10 gph overall on a 2-4 day trip. Best to have a Flowscan meter to monitor gph and overall fuel usage.

  10. #10

    Default Moving along

    Well I'm moving in the direction of making a offer on this boat. As part of the offer, I would request an engine, mechanical and oil analysis as well as a full survey. I found a shop near by that does all of this. For $90 they will do a boat survey and go over everything in the boat to make sure it works. For an additional $135 they will do a compression test, check all fluids, run motor and test all functions as well as check the out drive lube for functionality and make note about condition. He could not give me a price on the oil analysis due to the fact it is a "send out". What will the oil analysis tell me that the above will not? Is it irrational to ask for the above as part of the offer - I would pay for half of it.

    Thanks

  11. #11
    Member bhollis's Avatar
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    Here's a link to a discussion of the benefits of an engine oil analysis.

    They say that in order for the analysis to be useful, the oil being analyzed should have at least around 40 hours running time on it. Which may be a problem, since my guess is that the boat you're looking at has fresh oil in it. (And if it doesn't, then I'd be concerned that it was allowed to overwinter with old oil in it.)

    http://www.powerandmotoryacht.com/ma...-oil-analysis/

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