Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: 375 H&H Mag Rifles? Questions on Manufacturers.

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Former Palmer Resident, currently back in Northern NH
    Posts
    51

    Default 375 H&H Mag Rifles? Questions on Manufacturers.

    Hi everyone. I have had several 375's, from old Interarms Whitworth Express's, to CZ550's, to Win. M70 Safari Express's. I still have a CZ that I have had for a few years. It's a great gun, I just replaced the Bavarian stock with an American with the 2 crossbolts.
    Last year I bought a new M70 Safari and after trying several pairs of Leupold QR rings and bases (and even a set of STD rings and bases), there wasn't enough adjustment in a VXIII 2.5-8 to boresight either for windage or elevation. After some mediocre response from Winchester Repair I decided it should go back to Davidsons. I think either the mounting holes were wrong or the barrel was installed incorrectly. I kept on shooting the CZ.
    I was thinking about getting a new 375 as I want to give this one to my kid when he/she graduates HS. The serial number is 2007, the year he/she will be born which I thought was cool. I would like to give Winchester another try, but can't/won't pay the close to or over $2000 asking price currently on the auction boards. I have several Rugers (I just bought an M77 338 that I am having factory Ruger sights mounted on since Ruger dropped the RS option) and was interested in the M77 Express Magnum but haven't handled them due to feeling that they were way too spendy for me. I was wondering if anyone has had any experience with the Ruger Express rifle or have had similar experiences with Winchester.

    Mike

    PS- I know, I know, a SS/synthetic rifle is more practical but I hate that type of gun. I prefer to carry a bottle of "Sheath" in my pack and expect my rifle to get a few knocks. I do have a M70 Classic Stainless in 338 WM that I got at Walmart in Wasilla 9 years ago but as I said, I am not a big fan of the whole SS/Synth. thing. I also feel a rifle should have iron sights. As an aside, the knurling on the SS M70 bolt handle is awful, all flat and several misses.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    175

    Default

    It suprises and disapoints me that 338 don't come standard with iron sights. As far as the win/ruger/cz go, go for the cz and never look back. Or if you want somthin' that looks a lil' bit better get a montana rifle action and buy yourself a nice stock for it. I know the next rifle I purchase will be a 375 H&H...... and it'l be a CZ.

    CZ

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    If you are looking for another rifle very similar to your Win 70 but with better bottom metal then I would suggest a Montana Rifle Company stainless steel or blued chrome moly barreled action dropped into a McMillan stock. If you do not like a syn stock lots of companies (such As Serengetti rifles) make after market stocks for the Montana.
    Tennessee

  4. #4
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Bethel, Cantwell, Fort Yukon, Skagway, Chevak and Point Hope
    Posts
    967

    Default

    I had a Ruger 77 RSM several years ago but it was chambered in 416 Rigby. Handled real well and the weight was right. The express sights were't the best in the worl but they served their purpose. Nice wood. If you look on the auction sights on a regular basis you could probably find one at a reasonable price in 375 H&H. Sako is another option as is Remington.

  5. #5

    Default 375h&h

    I have all the rifles you speak of.

    Winchester had many QC issues in their later years. I had a 30-06 M70 Supergrade that was the worst machined rifle I've ever seen. Most everything was out of line and not square. The scope base mounting holes were not only off line w/ the barrel axis, but they were at an angle. That particular rifle was a money pit, but, I had access to a guild smith and his shop and everything was corrected. It became one of the nicest 30-06 rifle that I have owned. I also managed to get an M70 416 Rem Safari two weeks prior to the plant closing announcement. I was very fortunate to have been able to cherry pic the rifle from a shipment to the distributor. This particular rifle is good, but many were screwed up. I would personally be leery of paying jacked up prices for any of these rifles today. The M70 you had probably could have been redrilled to 8-40 base holes and made good for windage. Elevation is no problem to correct.

    Ruger Safari Magnums are really nice but they are very heavy. My 375H&H RSM weighs 7 pounds 10 ounces W/OUT the stock! They have an unusual recoil plate bedding system that limits your options.

    The CZ 550 is heavier than the M70 but it is lighter than the RSM and it is a full sized magnum. If I have any issue w/ this rifle, it is that it is NOT a mauser. A 98 Mauser consists of 32 simple and basic parts that are very durable and easily field repairable. The CZ 550 Safari has 19 parts in the trigger alone. It has nearly 120 individual parts and pieces including tiny nylon pins, pawls, retaining clips, etc. I'm of the opinion that the Winchester and the Ruger are closer to the simplicity of the basic mauser and I would prefer either of those over the CZ if I needed to rely on the rifle in a remote area.

    Remington is listing the Zastava 98 Mauser as the model 798. It is listed as available in stainless for 2007, but, I'm unsure if they have or will actually import them. This is a mauser that may have some potential.

    Ruger/Hornady is working on the new 375Ruger in the new mkII Hawkeye rifle that may have some potential as well.

    Good Luck,
    GVA

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Former Palmer Resident, currently back in Northern NH
    Posts
    51

    Default

    I am familiar with the ability to redrill and shim but wasn't about to go there on a high ticket M70. I was a little disgruntled at that point. I wondered what else was wrong at that point and didn't have very long to make up my mind. Right now I am more than a little turned off by the Winchesters. They were great rifles 50 years ago when the average American worker still had pride in their workmanship. These days people will work twice as hard as necessary simply to get out of what they are supposed to be doing. It makes me ill.

  7. #7
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Grass Lake Michigan
    Posts
    1,978

    Default 375 H&H Rifles

    Hi,

    I bought a Remington 700 XCR a few months ago. I know you said SS/SYN wasn't your cup of tea, but take a look at one. My first choice was a CZ 550 but the remington won me over. It even comes with iron sights. With a leupold VX-II 2-7 on it with QR bases, it came to less then $1200. Good Luck in your search, I hope it is a short one.

    Ron

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Former Palmer Resident, currently back in Northern NH
    Posts
    51

    Default

    Well, I just finished cleaning my CZ .375 and am really tempted to just get another one of these. Bookends!

    I am really not concerned about the CZ/Brno reliability. I think that it is probably at least as rugged as anything out there. It has certainly proven itself all over the world (in as remote areas as it gets) on dangerous game.

    As far as the Remington and Sako suggestions, I do like them both and own a 700 PSS in .300 Win. Mag, a 673 in .350 Rem. Mag, and a custom 700 .30-06 that I built myself (all metal parkerized, iron BDL sights, and B&C tan web synthetic stock). I have taken game with all 3 but for my main go-to rifle I still prefer CRF.

    I was mainly looking for feedback on Ruger RSM rifles (I have owned a pile of M77 standards, MKI and MKII) and similar Winchester M70 horror stories.

    Thanks for the feedback so far, I look forward to reading more.

    Mike

  9. #9
    Member WinMag_300's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    132

    Default

    I agree that a rifle should have iron sights. All of my rifles have them except a Howa .30-06 and I'm going to put Rem. BDL sights on that one. I think Remington makes the best sights and my main rifle is a 700 BDL with detachable mag in .300 win. mag.

    Rifle makers are going to "clean" barrels to save cost in the manufacturing process while trying to convince hunters that sights are not necessary. What a pile of crap. People have been shooting rifles with iron sights for over two hundred years and now all of a sudden they are unnecessary? I like see-through scope mounts so I can shoot near and far with ease. The other widely held misconception is that a scope should be mounted low. As long as there is enough adjustment in the scope so it is possible to zero the scope for the intended range, you can mount it high or low and I prefer high with see-through mounts.

    As far as I'm concerned, if the rifle company is not making the rifle you want, you should not buy from them. I don't like the idea of spending over a thousand dollars for a rifle and then taking it to a gunsmith to have it wrenched on. By now, the arms makers should know that some hunters want a rifle with iron sights. If they can't supply it, then they can go pound sand and I will buy from someone else.

    There is nothing wrong with CZ and their quality and price are right. Like I said, I shoot a Rem. 700 BDL with sights on the barrel and it has a walnut stock and blued steel. I don't like the stainless/synthetic rifles either. That's just another ploy to save cost while convincing the hunter they are getting a more weather resistant rifle. I guess some hunters and shooters are easily fooled. I'm now looking for a .338 Win. Mag. or .375 H&H rifle and I'm having a hard time finding what I want. I've been looking at CZ real hard lately.

    I think it is sad commentary that a major rifle manufacturer has to be told to offer rifles with sights on the barrel. They will either learn to satisfy the customer or close up shop.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Former Palmer Resident, currently back in Northern NH
    Posts
    51

    Default

    I just ordered another CZ American Safari. $819 out the door with the field grade stock. Now there's a rifle that you can use the daylights out of and not have a heart attack when you ding the Circassian stock. Now the serial numbered #2007 one can go back in the safe for my kid to have someday.

    Mike

  11. #11
    Member Matt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    3,410

    Default

    Find a nice used model 70 classic stainless 375 H&H rifle, drop it in a McMillan stock, and own the hunting world . . .

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Former Palmer Resident, currently back in Northern NH
    Posts
    51

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    Find a nice used model 70 classic stainless 375 H&H rifle, drop it in a McMillan stock, and own the hunting world . . .
    First you have to be able to find one that wasn't put together by a Special Ed. student (no offense to Special Ed. students intended..) and then there's the whole "Life is too short to hunt with an ugly rifle..." thing. I have a half decent M70 Classic Stainless in .338, I don't like SS/Synthetic rifles.... Matt, you did read the thread didn't you?

    Mike

  13. #13
    Member Matt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    3,410

    Default

    [QUOTE=Norseman;55873]First you have to be able to find one that wasn't put together by a Special Ed. student (no offense to Special Ed. students intended..) and then there's the whole "Life is too short to hunt with an ugly rifle..." thing. I have a half decent M70 Classic Stainless in .338, I don't like SS/Synthetic rifles.... Matt, you did read the thread didn't you?

    It sucks about your lemon, and I can honestly say that I never had a problem like that before or any problem, but then again I'm more picky than most and thoroughly look over a rifle before walking out of the store with it. And just because it's stainless and synthetic doesn't mean you have to keep it that way. Get an all-weather finish of your color choosing and grab a nice take-off supergrade model 70 stock off ebay. There you go. IMHO, a much better route than grabbing a heavy CZ with a rough action . . .

    P.S. You must not be looking around hard enough on the internet or locally, because I've seen quite a few model 70 big bores under the $1k price just recently. 3 or 4 come to mind at a gun show just this past weekend.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Former Palmer Resident, currently back in Northern NH
    Posts
    51

    Default

    The one that was all wrong was an M70 that an FFL friend ordered for me from Davidsons. When I got it it looked great, when I tried to mount the scope.....well.....

    I have thought about that route (coated gun and take off stock) but honestly like the CZ better than the post '64 Classic M70's. At least the CZ folks still have some pride in what goes out the door. Like I said in another thread, it makes me sick that the US manufacturers don't (typically) give a sh*t. That being said, my truck, ATV, boat, and Harleys (x2) are all mostly made here....

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WinMag_300 View Post
    The other widely held misconception is that a scope should be mounted low. As long as there is enough adjustment in the scope so it is possible to zero the scope for the intended range, you can mount it high or low and I prefer high with see-through mounts.
    Misconception??? You're entitled to your preference, but I know very few experienced shooters/hunters who share it. Mounting a scope up high enough to use the open sights makes the scope nearly useless on a standard stocked rifle. Yes, it can be used, but placing the comb on your jaw is hardly natural and definitely not conducive to quick shooting. Also, most of the stocks these days are designed for scoped rifles, have high combs, and the open sights seem to be added as an afterthought. I've picked up rifles where you couldn't even line up the sights! With most of the rest, you have to mash your cheekbone against the comb. Who wants to shoot a .375 (or anything other than a .22) in that position??? Not me! Anyway, with the standard off-the-shelf rifle these days people are better off with a scope mounted as low as the objective diameter will allow. If the rifle has open sights add quick release mounts so if you have the need to go into the thick stuff after a bear, or your scope fails, taking it off is a simple matter. I will never recommend see-through mounts to anyone. I guess that's a little more than my two cents worth, eh?

  16. #16
    Member WinMag_300's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akav8r View Post
    Misconception??? You're entitled to your preference, but I know very few experienced shooters/hunters who share it ...
    I know that I'm in the minority on this one and I'm not trying to convince anyone. What matters is I hit what I aim at and I don't have to fiddle with my scope mounts to remove the scope. I can just look through. I used to have the scope mounted low with Leupold STD mounts, but switched to see-through to make more accurate shots at close range. This set up works better than most folks realize.

    What you say about stock design and comb is true. Almost every production rifle is designed for scope use. I say almost. That's why I shoot a Rem. 700 BDL. It seems like the folks at Remington realize that some people still like to use open sights. The stock is designed to align the eye perfectly to the iron sights while still being reasonably comfortable with a scope.

    With big game, the extra 1-1/2" of height does not cause me a problem because the .300 Win Mag shoots flat enough and my Bushnell elite scope has more than enough adjustment. I have never missed a big game animal with this set up and dead is dead regardless of my scope mount.

    Like everything else in life, there is the "standard" way and then there's the way that works for the individual.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •