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Thread: Bear killed by Inuit hunter may be "Prizzly" Bear

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    Member baitem907's Avatar
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    Default Bear killed by Inuit hunter may be "Prizzly" Bear

    Bear killed by Inuit hunter may be polar-grizzly hybrid.

    http://www.canada.com/technology/story.html?id=2910680

    Audio of the hunter http://media.aprn.org/2010/ann-20100416-06.mp3
    "Holy smokes this bear looks different"
    Jess
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    Member Zinker's Avatar
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    Default

    Hmmm. It will be interesting to know for sure when they're done with the DNA.

    Would be cool to have another case tho.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default If...

    ...the PB's environment is truly disappearing, perhaps they are devolving?

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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Default I'm pretty sure...

    this isn't the first time this has come up. I heard a guy shot a polar bear that was part grizzly a couple of years back. I don't believe this is the same case though.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  5. #5

    Default National Geographic

    I was watching a National Geographic program just today that told the story of a hunter from the lower 48 with an Inuit guide hunting in far Northern Canada. They traveled many days by dog team to one of the large islands north of the mainland. The wound up stalking and killing a polar bear. When they approached the dead bear they noted that it looked different and was off-white in color. It had dark fur around the eyes and several other dark features. The color of the meat was also "different".

    They traveled back to the remote town to show it to Fish & Game and he (the hunter) received a citation for possesing illegal game.

    The program went on to show biological studies of the bears' DNA, as well as the taxidermists effort to fit this bears unusually shaped body and head to forms. The DNA testing showed it was neither a polar or a grizzly bear.

    I stopped watching the program with about 15 minutes left and I didn't see the legal outcome for the hunter. They did sort of conclude that a male grizzly had more than likely ventured way north of his usual feeding and mating grounds and had mated with a female polar bear.

    Interesting!
    Last edited by Judd; 04-17-2010 at 20:13. Reason: punctuation

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    Default Panda???

    perhaps Judd? & Sayak, yer just itchin' 2 argue eh? :P

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default No argument.

    Quote Originally Posted by gogoalie View Post
    perhaps Judd? & Sayak, yer just itchin' 2 argue eh? :P
    I'm thinking animals can actually change rather rapidly if they have the genetic make up to do so. Like the Russian foxes that took on dog-like characteristics after only a few generations in captivity.

    Perhaps polar bears, which are supposedly descended from some form of brown bear, or simply moving back in that direction as their environment changes... Don't know. Just a thought.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pike_palace View Post
    this isn't the first time this has come up. I heard a guy shot a polar bear that was part grizzly a couple of years back. I don't believe this is the same case though.
    Did you read the attached artical? it pretty much clear that all up... that this could be the SECOND one
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Default Gee...

    small wonder a fox would "act" like a dog, or have "dog-like characteristics" when theyr'e exactly the same...

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    Member hooternanny's Avatar
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    Talking intresting indeed

    very interesting..........and it makes me wonder....

    does anyone have the one that is half-bear/half-man

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Welll, I ain't gonna argue wichya Goalie...

    Quote Originally Posted by gogoalie View Post
    small wonder a fox would "act" like a dog, or have "dog-like characteristics" when theyr'e exactly the same...
    ... but polar bears are probably closer to brown/grizzlies than foxes are to most domestic dogs.
    http://www.abc.net.au/animals/program1/factsheet5.htm

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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default foxes

    foxes are actually quite seperated from domestic dogs the two cannot interbreed however coyotes, wolves and dogs can all interbreed and foxes cannot with any of them.....so polar bears and grizzlies are of a much closer relation....i think its more of a large boar grizzly having his way with a smaller receptive sow polar bear.....this is my guess since bears will go places as adults where their mothers have taken them as cubs and these animals have been taken out on the ice pack rather than inland
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

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    Default I stand...

    Corrected...all this time I was certain that Fox were canines...they're of the same family, but different speicies than Dogs, wolves. & yotes...Thanks Sharks...+1

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default They are all canines Goalie.

    Quote Originally Posted by gogoalie View Post
    Corrected...all this time I was certain that Fox were canines...they're of the same family, but different speicies than Dogs, wolves. & yotes...Thanks Sharks...+1

    They are all of the same family-canidae, but wolf and coyote are of the genus Canis, while the fox is of the genus- Vulpes

    So you weren't so wrong after all.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by baitem907 View Post
    Bear killed by Inuit hunter may be polar-grizzly hybrid.

    http://www.canada.com/technology/story.html?id=2910680

    Audio of the hunter http://media.aprn.org/2010/ann-20100416-06.mp3
    "Holy smokes this bear looks different"
    A buddy of mine has seen Jims Martell polar-griz mount in his home in Idaho. He said Jim owns a Elk farm in Idaho and they went to visit his ranch during an FFA convention. Jim rarely lets vistors into his trophy room my buddy said. He said he has a lot of mounts from his hunts all over the world......must be nice!!!

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    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default close but no cigar

    i wish you could cross dogs with fox....the reason i did the research and found out you couldn't was cuz i thought it would be cool to artificially inseminate my beagle with some sperm from the male silver fox i caught this year....a few minutes of google and found out that was a no go...darn....wouldn't that have been a neat looking critter.....probably would have been some kind of illegal too...never checked into that...
    nature does some funny stuff some times....i have worked on a few mule/whitetailed deer crosses and one mule/columbian blacktail cross....i'm surprised that i have never hear of black/grizzly crosses since there numbers are so much greater and territories overlap much more than that of polar/grizzly bears....both those are all ursus....i just watched a show on discovery or natgeo about the chupacabra in texas and they did dna testing on one of those hairless coyote looking things they are calling chupacabra.....it was determined that it was mostly coyote but at some point was crossed with either grey or mexican wolves....why it has no hair they didn't give an answer.....also if you look at ducks there are all types of hybrid ducks in the wild...some of them are pretty cool looking...
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

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    Default Canidae...

    sayak, denotes the family & Canine denotes the species/genus...big difference...

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Angry Dang! Yer argumentive!

    Quote Originally Posted by gogoalie View Post
    sayak, denotes the family & Canine denotes the species/genus...big difference...
    Yes, you are technically correct. I was just being nice. Even still, I was using the term "canine" broadly in regard to the family, not the genus nor species. Thus the red fox is: caniforma/canidae/caninae.

    That is also why I said:
    "... polar bears are probably closer to brown/grizzlies than foxes are to most domestic dogs...".

    Dogs (even poodles-yikes!) can possibly breed with wolves or coyotes, but foxes cannot.

    So, in the broadest sense, they are all "canines", though their species may be divergent (c. famliaris, v. vulpes, c. lupus, c. latrans, etc.).

    Makes one wonder how a poodle, looking as different as it does from a coyote, could breed with one, while a fox, looking more like small coyote cannot.

  19. #19

    Question I wonder how that worked out?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shoedawg View Post
    A buddy of mine has seen Jims Martell polar-griz mount in his home in Idaho. He said Jim owns a Elk farm in Idaho and they went to visit his ranch during an FFA convention. Jim rarely lets vistors into his trophy room my buddy said. He said he has a lot of mounts from his hunts all over the world......must be nice!!!
    It is my understanding that polar bears are not importable into the USA from Canada. This was not a "true" polar bear, but it was taken on a polar bear tag. It would be fun to read the CITES paperwork. In any event it would be a fun trophy to see! I'd love to have a polar bear! Wish they were easier to possess!

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    Member AlpineEarl's Avatar
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    Default ??????

    I thought this was supposed to be a nice wholesome board. It went from Polar-Grizz mixes to:

    Quote Originally Posted by sharksinthesalsa View Post
    cuz i thought it would be cool to artificially inseminate my beagle with some sperm from the male silver fox i caught this year....a few minutes of google and found out that was a no go...darn....
    Darn..is an understatement! What is going on in the Valley? How, EXACTLY, were you planning on getting the sperm??? Poor Beagle.

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