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Thread: Question about the Nallo 3GT

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    Member Ripper's Avatar
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    Default Question about the Nallo 3GT

    I've been looking at the Nallo 3 GT tent for sheep/goat hunting, but have one question...how can such a large and strong tent be so light? Does it have a floor? Are there any drawbacks other than price? OK, that was a few questions

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ripper View Post
    I've been looking at the Nallo 3 GT tent for sheep/goat hunting, but have one question...how can such a large and strong tent be so light? Does it have a floor? Are there any drawbacks other than price? OK, that was a few questions
    I have had the Nallo Gt3 for about a year now. Used it on 4 different hunts last fall. It does have a floor actually its a full double walled tent. The Nallo saves some weight over other mountain tents a couple ways for sure.


    1) The Fly material isn't as strong (but much lighter Kerlon 1200) than the same tent but strong fabric (Kerlon 1800 fabric) Hilleberg Nammajt GT3 (8.4 pounds for the same size tent) which has a much stronger fly material, but both are 100% waterproof the Nammajt just has I higher tear resistance.

    2) It isn't free standing. Meaning the tent needs to be staked out in order to stand which is fine as most free standing tents have vestibules that require stakes in order to work properly.

    Thats the main way the tent can be double walled 4 seasons have 37 sq ft of tent space with a inner tent that has a floor as well as have a giant 29 sq ft (size of many 2 person backpacking tents) vestibule for putting an extra person or TONS of gear out of the elements all for just 6.2 pounds.

    Hope that helps.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    definitely the best bomber tent I have found! The only thing I would rather be stuck in on the side of a mountain is my nallo 4 GT! I got the 4 because I use it on family hikes with the wife and 3 boys along. I still carry it up the mountain on 2 person hunts and for the 1 extra pound over the nallo 3 it is a castle! Despite the worries I had over going to a tunnel design I have to say that the nallo design just "wants" to stand up. You will probably have to actually use it to understand what I mean. But it isn't like other tunnel designs I have played with.

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    I love my nallo 3 gt, the only draw back that I have found is that it dosent breath that well.

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    one cool thing is that you can pack the fly only and have a single-walled floorless tent for significant weight savings.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

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    Member oakman's Avatar
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    the main factor in the weight of a tent is the poles. Tunnel tents have a lot of floor space in relation to the amount of poles.

    I have the Nallo 3GT, and I can't say enough about it. It's lightweight, especially for the size, and I just love having all that extra room inside for gear and stretching out.

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default Nallo Question

    While we are talking about nallos, Do you guys recommend the Footprint?.....Haven't got one for mine yet...

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by kahahawai View Post
    While we are talking about nallos, Do you guys recommend the Footprint?.....Haven't got one for mine yet...
    I asked this question when I got mine last year. Seems some do and some don't. You can always run some of the tent fix tape when you get back from the hunt to seal up your floor if you happen to punch a hole in it. So far with about 30 nights in my tent haven't even come close to punching a hole, a little fore thought in site selection pretty much eliminates the need for the extra bulk and weight of a footprint IMO. If I remember right the foot print causes your vestibule to have a floor which I didn't want. That and it bumps the total tent weight up nearly 1.5 pounds. And lastly it would add to the setup time of the tent, which isn't long, but still just another thing to do when setting up the tent.

    All that added up to I'll take my chances and perhaps scope out my tent site a little better. I mean this is a non-freestanding tent so its not like I'll be setting it up in the middle of a boulder field anyways.

  9. #9

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    I have a footprint but it only gets used while using the outer fly alone in winter to keep the snow from getting in everything. Otherwise I just use a lightweight bivy while floorless(5oz), and thats just to protect my down sacks. I have yet to use it at all when using the inner and outer together. Another side benefit of being comfortable using the fly alone is less wear and tear on the inner.

    *edit*
    When winter hits I just leave the footprint connected to the fly and the inner at home in a sack, doesnt add to the setup time.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Interesting, it sounds like it may be worth it for winter camping! I spend my winters in the middle east (post 911 snowbird!) so I won't be purchasing one any time soon but I can definitely see the benefit there.

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    Member oakman's Avatar
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    I bought a footprint and really like having a floor in the vestibule. I haven't been bringing it on my sheep hunts in the interest of saving weight.

  12. #12

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    The footprint really makes the tent. It hooks on to the bottom and is much more than just a tarp. It makes the vestibule a whole separate tent area. Nice for getting dressed and keeping things dry. I leave my footprint hooked up and just roll the tent up in the footprint. Makes for ultra quick sets, and the vestibule and tent stay dry!

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    Member Ripper's Avatar
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    Default Really a 3-man?

    What about the size? Can you really sleep 3? I plan on sleeping 2 in it most of the time, but would like to sleep 3 occasionally. Looking at the dimensions on the Hilleberg webpage, the width of the inner tent is 64 in. Since most sleeping bags are about 30"-32" wide at the shoulder, it seems like 3 would be an awfully tight squeeze. Granted, the 3rd person could sleep in the vestibule, but that's not really the point of a 3-man tent. And sleeping head-to-toe isn't practical when most tent sites are on a slope...

    Is the inner tent Kerlon 1200 as well, or is it mesh? Is the floor Kerlon 1200, or something heavier? The website is a bit lacking in some details...and I really need to make a trip up to ANC to look at one for myself, if they are in stock at Barney's.

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ripper View Post
    What about the size? Can you really sleep 3? I plan on sleeping 2 in it most of the time, but would like to sleep 3 occasionally. Looking at the dimensions on the Hilleberg webpage, the width of the inner tent is 64 in. Since most sleeping bags are about 30"-32" wide at the shoulder, it seems like 3 would be an awfully tight squeeze. Granted, the 3rd person could sleep in the vestibule, but that's not really the point of a 3-man tent. And sleeping head-to-toe isn't practical when most tent sites are on a slope...

    Is the inner tent Kerlon 1200 as well, or is it mesh? Is the floor Kerlon 1200, or something heavier? The website is a bit lacking in some details...and I really need to make a trip up to ANC to look at one for myself, if they are in stock at Barney's.
    If you are related to me you can. I come from a small breed and easily fit my dad, wife, and myself in it on a goat hunt. Granted t was two in the tent and one in the vestibule when eating breakfast and dinner in the tent as the weather was nasty. But I was the largest person at 5'9 155. My wife is 5'3 (no I'm not dumb enough to list her weight ) and my pops is a wee little man at 5' even.

    30-32" non-mummy sleeping bags might be that wide with no one in the bag but once you get in it that width is taken up with the height needed to wrap around your body. Plus most sleeping pads are only 20" wide anyways so if you have them touching you'll have 3" or so to spare. Its doable for three small people or even normal people for a limited amount of time but I wouldn't wanna weather a storm with 2 other normal size guys for several days in it. Ideally its meant for 2 guys with LOTS of space. If you are looking at putting 3 normal size guys in a Nallo GT grab the GT4.

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    Default 3 "men" in Nallo 3 GT

    'Lanche beat me to most of what I was going to add about most sleeping pads being 20", not leaving much space in between, to give you an idea of actual space.

    I've done a pretty intense week long sheep hunt in a Nallo 3GT with 3 "men", 2 dudes at 6' and 200 lbs, and one at 5'-11" and 165.

    After putting in as many miles and vertical as we did, nudging, snoring, accidental kicking and elbowing at night really didn't phase us. The two people on the outside will get the outside of their sleeping bags damp from condensation from pressing against the side walls of the tent at night. This will be unavoidable with 3 "men".

    I wouldn't recommend it for 3 "larger" men, if you are not comfortable with the "dogpile" method of crashing for the night.

    It would be downright comfortable for 2 men and their gear, though.

    Good luck, have fun, and get out and enjoy the spring weather! ;-)

  16. #16
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I don't have much to add but concur with all the above. I will say that the Nallo 4 at about a pound more is great for 3 men but 4 would be pretty tight. I use mine to stuff the whole family in. Me wife and 3 kids (8,6,3) have enough room but that is mostly because my kids are dog pile sleepers. They tend to all pile in one twin bed most of the time at home.

  17. #17
    Member Ken R's Avatar
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    Default little late?

    I may be a little late in getting in here, but I was pretty much set on buying the Nallo 3 GT until my taxidermist told me today that he just got rid of his due to the condensation issues. Do you guys that have them have these same issues? This is alot of coin to drop on a tent and I was ready to pull the trigger until today. **** taxidermist!

  18. #18

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    Ken R,

    I don't know about others but the only time I have had an issue with condensation was when I was winter camping. It was -15 and my wife and I had a good amount of frost on the inner tent in the morning, but i think that is normal for winter camping from what I have done, except for in an Arctic Oven then all the frost is on the rainfly.

    The time when were was 3 of us camping in the Nallo 3 it was so foggy that visibility was down to less than 100 yards so it was VERY humid and pouring rain. In next morning it was the same conditions. After 3 of us sleeping in there all night the only condensation we had was underneath the fly not on the inner tent at all, which is what I would hope to expect would happen given the conditions. The rest of the time when there is just 2 of us in the tent I haven't had problems at all. However, YMMV.

  19. #19
    Member oakman's Avatar
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    Default condensation

    I'm not sure I'd call them problems, but I have had condensation in my tent a few times. It seems to be most noticible when there is no wind. Last year I took it on two hunts. One in the Alaska Range and once to Kodiak. In Kodiak (obviously more humidity, but no rain while we were there) there was a lot more condensation, but we had placed the tent completely out of the wind. I don't think I'll do that again.

    I just used a small pack towel to wipe the tent down every morning and that was it. If your sleeping bag is up against the wall of the tent there will be a bit of moisture on it in the morning.

    I would also say that while cooking (jet boil) in the vestibule is nice when the weather sucks that all that steam has to go somewhere. I have moved my "kitchen" to just outside the door so the steam goes to the great outdoors and not in the tent.

    I heard the same issues before I got mine. After 2 1/2 seasons of use, I'd still do it again.

    Richard

  20. #20
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default Condensation

    When I bought my tent, I was told that the nallo's had a bad condensation problem but to avoid it was to crack the zippered door open a little more than usual and keep the vestibule closed to allow more ventilation, wondered if you guys tried that and if it helped...

    My 4 season MH Bunker 1 solo tent had a bad condensation problem too, it gets too hot in there, but having a wiggys glacier hunter bag helped keep me dry.

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