Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: What bush plane can carry a 55 gallon drum, canoe?

  1. #1
    Member billy jack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Wasilla AK
    Posts
    182

    Default What bush plane can carry a 55 gallon drum, canoe?

    I'm needing a 55 gallon drum (empty) for my remote property to store some gear for this fall's moose hunt. I think it is a little late to attempt to haul it out to the property via snowmobile, so my question what size plane can fit an empty 55 gallon frum into, onto?

    Also I need a canoe to be flown out to the property (plane on floats), I'm pretty sure beaver can haul it out there, strapped to the floats, but I don't remember if the pilot has to haul it out alone, no passenders. Any info whould help. Thanks Billy

  2. #2
    Member algonquin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seldovia, alaska
    Posts
    840

    Default try a 206

    The 206 will haul a drum and I don't know about the canoe never flew floats.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    south of the AC
    Posts
    194

    Default

    The 55 gal drum will fit in a champ if the back seat folds down, done it plenty with my champ, plus carrying a bunch of fuel.

    A cub or a champ (7GCBC) on floats will carry the canoe if it isn't to big. Don't forget the external load permit.

    Bigger airplanes will do more of course too.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Eagle River<AK
    Posts
    285

    Default drum

    A pa12 or even a PA18 can carry it

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak, AK
    Posts
    694

    Default

    I would get 2-30 gallon plastic containers instead, much easier to do about everything with. They still weight 180 pounds, but are alot more manageable. Then just take one of the shake up siphon hose and a 5 gallon can can and your good to go. If your taking a boat, I love the 15 gallon plastic jugs.

    Terry

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Semi-retired in Florida
    Posts
    483

    Default

    Passengers are allowed only if they are required for the loading/unloading of the boat or canoe (or anoything else, which makes them "crew members." A C-206 on floats will easily carry three full 55-gal drums inside. The large cargo door accomodates these quite well. Anchoir the drums well, since any quick stop (emergency landing, for instance) will want to scoot those drums into the pilot and or front seat passenger. Caution when unloading, too, since once they start rolling down the planks they are hard to stop! The drums are steel, the floats are aluminum. That give you a clue as to which will win out in an argument? Just be careful with the heavy drums. Empty? Four easily . . . . .

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Semi-retired in Florida
    Posts
    483

    Default

    Oh yeah - - - - - your pilot will know enough to tie the canoe upside down on the right float . . . . . Almost any airplane will fly with the canoe out there.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    A properly equipped Beaver can carry external loads with passengers. It'll also carry drums easily. A cub will carry the drum but it isn't easy to load a heavy drum. 206 is a better choice. Any floatplane can carry the canoe as an external load. Paperwork makes it legal but the airplane won't know the difference.

  9. #9
    New member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2

    Default Tying canoes on planes

    I have read the comments and I have a few questions. My canoe is fairly big but is under 70 lbs. Having little to do with planes but lots to do with pack horses, I am quite amazed that the canoes aren't centred under the fuselage or balanced for both weight and aerodynamic reasons. I guess it is easy enough to shift a few things inside to balance the weight tho, although there is a leverage factor too. I wonder if some sort of cover over the open part of the canoe would not improve the airodynamics of the load. I also wonder that some research institute has not done tests on the best way to load a canoe and attach it.

    From what I have read, am I correct in assuming that if you own your own float plane and flying for yourself, you have different restrictions than if you are flying commercially? I am actually thinking of buying my own float plane. If I do, I will have to learn how to fly of course but I have driven a lot of different things in my life and that does not concern me.

    What does concern me is what the cost of insurance for a private plane might be. I am considering an older Cessna. I suppose it varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, but some ball park figures would be nice.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Semi-retired in Florida
    Posts
    483

    Default

    It used to be that, unless you're flying Wipline floats, cables and pulleys will prohibit loading anything "centered between the floats." External loads, if tied to the float fittings, are usually carried on the RIGHT float.

    No, you'll notice no eccentric loading with the canoe on the right float. Tie it on "upside down," which will no doubt mean tying it agains the float fittings, which will put it at an angle with the keel (bottom) in the more upright position. Tie SECURELY to the float fittings. DO NOT try to enclose it to get better aerodynamics! You will probably just build a container for holding spray. Just do it like all the other guys. For a good look, visit Lake Hood and pay attention to the big guys.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Semi-retired in Florida
    Posts
    483

    Default

    The biggest difference between commercial and private flying restrictions has to do with flying for hire. As a private pilot, you may not fly for hire, though you MAY "share the costs" of your flying activities with your passenger(s). If you do that, remember that insurance, tiedown, maintenance, and purchase or replacement costs should be added to the gas and oil as legitimate portions of the cost of operation.

    Neither license will have much to do with exterior loads, which are another matter for "approvals."

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Floats that I've owned all had flying wires, wires/straps crossed diagonally between floats that square the floats. No loading a canoe there. 70 pounds isn't a balance concern. And the drag of a canoe is no problem. In fact Jon boats are frequently carried on float struts and the preferred loading is stern to the front. Whether commercial or private there's a restriction on passengers. The only occupants allowed in the plane are the pilot and necessary crew. Necessary crew is loosely defined and lots of private guys push the definition in order to take a friend.

    For a new pilot in a $100K Cessna 180 on floats in Alaska I'd guess full insurance would cost near $10K per year. Of course you can't fly floats all year round so the rate would drop some for winter and reduce your actual annual cost a little.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •