Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: keeping them alive?

  1. #1
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default keeping them alive?

    Just wondering what most folks are doing when bank fishing for reds. Are you trying to keep your fish fresh and alive on a stringer or are you killing them? Are you bleeding them as soon as you catch them?

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    I don't have the regs handy, but if memory serves me correctly it is not legal to stringer live salmon. They are either released alive or killed and become part of your limit. I bleed my fish immediately, a small cut in the gills or tail and let them bleed out. Really improves taste.

    I'm sure others will clarify this for us. Reminds me that I need new regs for the boat.

    Steve

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tboehm View Post
    Just wondering what most folks are doing when bank fishing for reds. Are you trying to keep your fish fresh and alive on a stringer or are you killing them? Are you bleeding them as soon as you catch them?
    I bonk them on the head and then bleed the gills, you can either use a knife to do this or just reach up and rip out with your hands. Even if it was legal to keep them alive I wouldn't want a stringer of flopping salmon next to me.

  4. #4
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the 907
    Posts
    2,326

    Default

    I cut the gills and put them on the bank. Had fishing guide tell me that leaving them in the water is bad as it softens up the skin and meat and makes it not as good.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,593

    Default as stated

    either cut thru one side of gill rakers or a cross cut on the body right at the tail fin (like you're cutting the tail off - only just cut to the spine).
    Gary

  6. #6
    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    375

    Default

    The idea behind the rule is that F&G dosen't want ppl retaining fish and then catching more and the selectively releasing the small ones.

    I've also heard it will cause undue stess to the fish and the meat quality will suffer.

    My routine is land the fish and bonk. Rip the gills and bleed them out by waving them back and forth in the current, then immediatly gut and dress. I think it improves the meat quality to get the guts out quickly. More so with ocean-fish that may still have some food in their bellies that can go sour. I do try to keep them out of the water if possible. If it's warm out, a wet burlap sack works pretty well at keeping the fish cool by evaporative cooling.
    Nice Marmot.

  7. #7
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    step 1: put on stringer
    step 2: rip gills
    step 3: let it swim around till the bloods gone

    works great with Halibut too
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    All of my salmon are caught in a gill net and we peel the filets off as quickly as possible.

    I put halibut on a stringer off the side of the boat and cut their tails. They pump themselves dry.
    Now what ?

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    A, A
    Posts
    70

    Default

    Catch them and bleed them, at one time it was illegal to keep a live fish because of the splashing attacks bears.

  10. #10
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Spenard
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    step 1: put on stringer
    step 2: rip gills
    step 3: let it swim around till the bloods gone

    works great with Halibut too
    Yep. Ditto that.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  11. #11

    Default

    hmm, why keep them out of the water? You'd think as cold as the water typically is it would help, after bonked and bled to get them cold faster? Not much different then an ice bath though not quite as cold. In a perfect world a cooler with ice is a handy thing, but it isnt always a reality. Forgive my ignorance on this one, but I've never had mushy fish using this method?!?! maybe I've just been lucky?

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Chandler, Arizona
    Posts
    632

    Default

    I catch em, bleed em and let them float on the stinger (rope) until I catch my limit. Haven't had a bad tasting fish yet!

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Texas (I miss AK)
    Posts
    174

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    hmm, why keep them out of the water? You'd think as cold as the water typically is it would help, after bonked and bled to get them cold faster? Not much different then an ice bath though not quite as cold. In a perfect world a cooler with ice is a handy thing, but it isnt always a reality. Forgive my ignorance on this one, but I've never had mushy fish using this method?!?! maybe I've just been lucky?
    I think you take the biggest chance of having less tasty fish when you gut the fish and then put it back in the water. I've done it and can't tell much difference, but it does make sense that you don't want water running over the meat.

    I bonk mine on the head, cut the gills, and put on the stringer to bleed out. The first year I was here, no one mentioned the bleed out thing to me. Much better fish when I learned the right way.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I don't have the regs handy, but if memory serves me correctly it is not legal to stringer live salmon. They are either released alive or killed and become part of your limit. I bleed my fish immediately, a small cut in the gills or tail and let them bleed out. Really improves taste.

    I'm sure others will clarify this for us. Reminds me that I need new regs for the boat.

    Steve
    Steven,

    You are right about keeping them alive on the stringer....technically you are transporting live fish which is frowned upon and illegal. But, with that said, I have never heard of anyone ever getting a ticket for salmon on a stringer. I bleed them like you do, and then put them right into a large cooler that has milk jugs full of ice (overkill probably but I often overnight somewhere) in it. Like other have noted, they come out perfectly every time.

  15. #15
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    hmm, why keep them out of the water? You'd think as cold as the water typically is it would help, after bonked and bled to get them cold faster? Not much different then an ice bath though not quite as cold. In a perfect world a cooler with ice is a handy thing, but it isnt always a reality. Forgive my ignorance on this one, but I've never had mushy fish using this method?!?! maybe I've just been lucky?

    When a fish is alive in the water its heart is pumping blood and this keeps positive pressure in the fishes body. After death the pressure is lost, the flesh will start to absorb the surrounding fluids in the absence of positive pressure.

    Steve

  16. #16

    Default

    Steve,

    WHere in the world did you find that information? I'm not saying it's wrong just never heard it before. In a way it makes sense... though I've never had one that was mushy due to moisture. Other then a few blushed coho's I've never had a mushy king or sockeye..... So far the best I can tell the coho's were all females and blushed not red....I'll never keep anything less then a dime bright coho again....usually by the time they run I have more then my fair share of fish in the freezer it's all for fun anyways, though I have a killer recipe for a coho roll up...yummmmm!

  17. #17
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    When I lived in Hawaii, I caught and sold marlin and tuna. I learned how to handle fish preparing them for the sale.

    Here is a copy and paste talking about water absorption.

    "Fish held in any liquid system absorb water rapidly. This can lead to a 3% weight increase after four days. All of this increased weight may be lost when fish are later stored on ice."

    http://74.125.155.132/search?q=cache...ient=firefox-a

    Steve

  18. #18
    Member tboehm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Soldotna AK
    Posts
    2,407

    Default nice article

    stid2677 - that is a great article! Thanks for taking the time to post it. If possible, I think it should be copied and put in a sticky.

  19. #19

    Default Fish Handling

    Thx, STID2677, interesting article. Technique for handling catch similar to others I've seen on this site....reminder how important care and handling after catch is to quality of end product and flavor over time. I hadn't considered or known of the cause/effect of holding catch by tail to blood spots seen on cleaned fish. Thx, Steve.

  20. #20
    Member FishGod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fishing your hole before you get there
    Posts
    1,948

    Default

    You bleed them as soon as possible. When you are fighting the fish there is a build up of lactic acid. If you don't bleed the fish this can lower the desirable taste of your catch. The main reason you shouldn't leave the fish in the water are the bacteria in the water and the fish.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •