Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: 100.pd propane cylinders and how long do they last

  1. #1

    Default 100.pd propane cylinders and how long do they last

    i have a question for some one who can answer this one..i know that the biggest you can get is the 100pd sized of a propane tank ..so how many times a year you think you will need to refill the tank per year,,

    i have a stove and tankless hot water heater on the lp. that it ..the rest of the heating is done by a small sailboat stove unit ..design for the small sailboat as a cooking and heating unit for the whole boat..

  2. #2
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    It's gonna depend on how much you use hot water. I had a 100 gallon that ran just my kitchen stove and it lasted a year give or take.

    In Alaska LP sucks for high demand things like a furnace or a tankless. When it gets below zero the liquid takes too long to evaporate to gas. The more liquid you have the better it will handle peak loads so you want as much as you can get even if you got to tie tanks together in series to get the volume up. I have heard in places that get -30 or -40 and stay that way for a week or more LP will not turn to gas at all leaving you freezing with a tank of LP you can’t use till it worms up some. This is a major reason very few people heat with LP in Alaska, oil is often more money but is more reliable in the cold.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tok
    Posts
    54

    Default

    Definetly the amount of usage is going to dictate. I heat my poorly insulated office cabin (16x26) with gas and fill a 300 tank about 1 1/2 times a year. My house 300 tank gets filled about every 3-4 years. It supplies the stove and dryer.

    Regarding the use in cold areas as far as propane or lp goes the stuff used in the interior is good to 57 below verus #1 oil of 63 below. If the tank is properly protected you shouldn't have problems at temps colder then 60 below. However the little 1 lb bottles that you use in stoves & heaters don't do well at 10 below or colder and must be "cared" for to work. So it depends on the source of gas in the area.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    952

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by John/Alaska View Post
    Regarding the use in cold areas as far as propane or lp goes the stuff used in the interior is good to 57 below verus #1 oil of 63 below.

    That must not be straight propane. Propane's boiling point (at normal pressure) is -44. However, when a liquid boils into gas it becomes colder. That's why you will often see frost on a LP tank even if it is over 32. It's also why you normally won't get enough gas out the tank long before you get to -44. The faster you draw propane from a tank the colder the remaining liquid in the tank gets.

  5. #5
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    I have a Coleman Mr. Hearer (or whatever they call it) and the hose kit tying it to a 5 gallon LP tank. When I first used it I was not at all impresses with it and still freezing my feet in my ice fishing tent at just zero outside. I complained about it to another guy out on the ice and he said "Take the tank in the tent cheechako!" So I did and in half an hour I had to turn the little heater down. Cold has a dramatic effect on LP's evaporation rate but like I said it can be somewhat overcome by just having more liquid to draw from. With oil you can insulate the tank, enclose it in a heated building, and/or run an inline anti gel heater like we do on diesel trucks. With LP insulation may just keep the cold in the tank and it's not wise it put a houses tank inside a heated space due to filling and over pressure purging issues, but at least the lines are almost a non issue with LP.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  6. #6

    Default

    What about a tank blanket?

  7. #7

    Default

    do they make a blanket with a liner to help keep the unit semi warm in Alaska weather ..here is my idea find a boat shop that has a sail loft and see about putting togerther two blankets inside a brown water proof unit that slips over the unit two cylinder set up and along a small platform to let the unit stand up right to keep from comeing into the contact with the ground.would that help with the cold ..

  8. #8

    Default

    or a box with a small platform for them to stand on with a 1."inch thick foam lineing between the units sides and top and door unit with a small venting system outlet on the bottom of the unit and the top to let out any propane build up etc etc etc that should help with the cold weather some right ..

  9. #9
    Member mit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    702

    Default

    11 months 13 days 22 hours 16.5 seconds.
    Tim

  10. #10
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    LP gets cold as it evaporates just like Freon, in fact down in Mexico they started using it to replace Freon in cars when R12 prices went through the roof. So using insulation on the tank will trap that cold inside the tank. You could wrap pex pipe around it under your blanket then pump a worm liquid through the pex, that’s the only ‘safe’ way I can think to make it cold proof.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    LP gets cold as it evaporates just like Freon, in fact down in Mexico they started using it to replace Freon in cars when R12 prices went through the roof. So using insulation on the tank will trap that cold inside the tank. You could wrap pex pipe around it under your blanket then pump a worm liquid through the pex, that’s the only ‘safe’ way I can think to make it cold proof.
    so how would you do a basic pumping cycle of hot water with the water from a small hot water heater set up to cycle the water through the pipes around the tanks .. .. they lays the question on the idea ..

    for the little cabin i went with a small tankless style hot water heater system ..

    there is got to be a way where you could force hot air through the pipes from a small heater fan set up to keep the tanks from freezeing up ..

  12. #12
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    The normal way is to plumb it would be like an ice melting loop in a driveway or sidewalk. A loop of heated water comes off the heat source with a pump through a liquid to liquid heat exchanger. Then the outside loop goes through the heat exchanger, is filled with glycol, and with a pump to move it. Both pumps come on from the same thermostat and your demand heater will come on when it senses cold water flowing.

    The cheap on the fly way that comes to mind is a car radiator inside your heated space up higher than the tank so the radiator cap is the high point. Plumb the pex through it with an in line circulator pump and a little fan to move room air over the coils. Fill it with 50/50 glycol and water so it won’t freeze when off. Put the fan and pump on a switch or thermostat so when the LP gets below “X” temp the system runs. It would not “heat” the tank but should take the edge off the cold enough to work.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  13. #13

    Default

    thanks for the info ..i give that a try here shorty ..

  14. #14
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    A little tip,

    If your propane does frezze up on you, take a pan of water out and pour it over the top of the tank. Instant reprieve.

    We used to have to do this at alot of our holliday meals when I was growing up.

  15. #15

    Default

    thank you for the tip.. trying to get everything in place and done dureing the summer time so when old man winter rolls around again i be ready for him..

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by henry2 View Post
    do they make a blanket with a liner to help keep the unit semi warm in Alaska weather ..here is my idea find a boat shop that has a sail loft and see about putting togerther two blankets inside a brown water proof unit that slips over the unit two cylinder set up and along a small platform to let the unit stand up right to keep from comeing into the contact with the ground.would that help with the cold ..
    Alaska Tent and Tarp can fabricate anything you can probably imagine, for a cost.

    I could imagine going to Bishops, scoring a sleeping bag, or some blankets, quits, buying a blue tarp / bungees or duct tape, and wrapping it up in the blankets, whatever, covering with a blue trap, and securing with bungees or duct tape and coming to the same conclusion as having something fab'd.

    That way, come spring when the squirrels molest the cover for nesting material, you're out an old blanket that can be replaced by another.

  17. #17

    Default

    thanks again guys .. after talking to a couple of people about the winter cold and the use of the lp on the cabin . they basic said to figure out how to keep it semi warm to a point to allow it to be used ..

  18. #18

    Default

    100# Bottle is 24 gallons 2,191,920 btu's you can google the useage lights,refrigerator, pilots etc.

  19. #19

    Default 100Lb Propane

    I have a small shed that is insulated ,it is just a little bigger than two 100lbs bottles and I have a rack out of heavy gage angle metal so that I can stack 10 to 12 fire brichs that have been heated on the wood stove. It sits next to the cabin but is contained in its self so there is no way for any kind of leak to get into the cabin. With doors that are also insulated you can make quite warm and by having two sets of bricks you can always have a set in the ready. Also by having two bottles with a switching valve you can change to the other bottle with out having to change out bottles at a inconvient time.

  20. #20
    Member wolfkiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    north pole ak
    Posts
    408

    Default answer

    I use 100lb tanks for my tankless and cook stove. a tank lasts us about 5 months. We are a family of 5.
    A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

    www.arcticconcealment.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •