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Thread: Camp Food

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    Default Camp Food

    I know nearly everyone on this forum has spent many a night cooking over a campfire. I think eating well whilst not the reason we head into the wilderness definitely makes the trip more enjoyable.
    I'm trying to prepare a trip for summer and need some ideas... So who's willing to share their favorite cooking recipes?

    Hesh

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I like a nice polish sausage wrapped in aluminum foil with saurkraut. Warm the buns too. Quick and easy. When hungry, pretend you are at Costco.

    If you have a small grill. Try bulgogi. Thin steak, seasoned Korean style with green onions, quick grilled. Works great with sticky rice or even in a sammich!

    My favorite is mexican food prepared in advance and warmed to perfection. We had a feast at Lake Louise a few years ago that was unbelievable. It did require an oven in a camper though. For this summer, I am thinking Carne Asada steak on a flour tortilla, with onion, cheese, lettuce and tomato. Add guacamole (go to Earnestos for theirs as a sample) and sour cream if you like.

    As usual - Anything on a stick. Pork, steak, chicke, shrimp, onions, bell peppers, on a k-bob stick. I have been thinking scallops, but have never tried it. I love scallops especially with bacon.

    Mike

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    BTW hesh - Welcome to the forum!
    Mike

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    when i can, i love to have on hand a can of stagg chili, whatever your favorite flavor, a couple of jalapeno cheddar brats or plain ol cheddar brats, and a slab of jalapeno cornbread, all heated to perfection in the pot over the stove or coals and chased with a fine oatmeal stout or india pale ale....You can hardly eat better! makes me happy jus thinkin about it......even better if you can catch yourself a burbot, skin and chop it up into good 1 inch chunks, boil it in half water/ hlaf seven up, then get yourself alittle butter and garlic sauce warmed to dip it in....you doin just fine....im also a big fan of sandbar cooked fish (grayling, dollies, rainbows, and definately salmon)...not to mention grouse and ptarmigan... i always make sure i have a yard of aluminum foil in my pack, with some little bit of seasonings, oh yea..... i can keep going here with fresh moose, goat, sheep, black bear, you name it....i bet i could write a book on this subject. haha



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    Below are some suggestions for lightweight food options on trips where you are not carrying a car cooler. For short jaunts out, or "car camping" ideas, just buy a dutch oven recipe book and get started. Pretty hard to beat a dutch oven


    On remote fly in float trips, weight/volume are always obstacles when planning meals. Also, if you are not carrying a cooler, you have more to factor in. While there are many ways to do things, some work better than others. Each float trip, we revise our food choices, holding on to what worked last time, and improving on food choices we were not so happy. Below is a brief run down of how I do things. Perhaps some of this information will generate some thought to help you better plan food on your next float trip.

    For breakfast, we like bagels with the precooked bacon packs. The Boars Head comes in two seperate pouches which is convenient. Oscar Meyer comes in one bigger pack. We like block cheese and Harvest Food eggs (see their website for all kinds of great products). I use their powdered oil/shortening in my dutch oven. Works just like regular oil but without the weight/mess. We also take hot oatmeal and recently discovered Richmoor cold cereal. Just add water type. It comes in granola with strawberries and granola with raspberries. Both are delicious. I am 6' 6" and weigh 300 lbs. So I will buy 4 packs of the cereal and vacuum seal. 2.5 for me and 1.5 for my wife. If you eat a 2,000 calorie a day diet normally, perhaps one pack would be enough for breakfast. They taste great. I buy mine from www.wildernessdining.com This site sells lots of other great food items. Check out their website for all kinds of food related items. Great selection of hard to find items. I get the peanut butter and jelly individual packs there too. Great for putting on flour tortilla wraps or bagels for snacks/lunches. Very convenient. Comes with strawberry or grape jelly. These are larger packs and have plenty to make a sandwich or bagel. They also sell cheese in packs like this. That with some pilot bread would make a great snack/lunch.

    For lunch we take Mountain House Pro Paks. Vacuum sealed and slightly smaller portions than the regular Mtn House meals, they pack small and light yet are plenty for lunch. They come in about 10 different types. Chilli-Mac, spaghetti, and Lasagna are my favorites. Go to the Mountain House website and order there. One nice thing about having these meals for lunch everyday is that it makes things simple. No meal planning. Save that for the dinners. Keep it simple. Just boil some water riverside and have lunch. This route also saves weight compared to many other food ideas.

    For dinner, we go through more trouble. For the purpose of good morale perhaps. We take Darn Good (brand) dried chilli bags and make Jiffy cornbread in the dutch oven. We also make grayling gumbo. We take Zatarains Gumbo (dry mix) and slivers of about 2 lbs of grayling. Cook slow while the Bisquick garlic biscuits cook in the aluminum GSI 10" dutch oven. It only weighs 4 lbs and can be found on the wilderness dining website above. Also at Campmor.com. If weight/space allows, a few small bags of charcoal will make your life alot easier. We cook fish for about 3/7 meals too. Usually dolly vardon (arctic char). We get Idaho instant potatoes (garlic is our favorite). We will make garlic bisuits in the dutch oven to go with. We also make mac and cheese to go with fish. Simple things like that. Some of the easy to make Suddenly Salad brands are nice too. They have a ranch and italian cold pasta salad. Great sides for a fish meal. We have also packed the 10" pita pizza deals. Take the pizza sauce in the bags and some block cheese to grate. Two per person may be enough. And of course the pepperoni. In a pinch, we will just have one of the extra Mtn House Pro Paks. Maybe too tired to cook or got into camp late. Bad weather and such. I always carry 2-3 extra Mtn House Pro Paks. One tip, tape a disposable plastic spoon to the lasagna packs. The cheese in them is nearly impossible to get off your standard Lexan spoon. We burn the disposable spoon with the bag the meal was in. Dishes done.

    Save the clean lexan spoon for stirring the 100 proof peppermint schnapps into the hot chocolate. Also, Captain Morgans rum and hot apple cider is a good camp fire drink. For other times of the day, we take Crystal Light sticks and perhaps one gatorade packet per person/per day.

    For deserts, we take the Backpackers Pantry (brand) cheese cake and cream pie (same things). I love lemon, but chocolate mousse, strawberry, banana, and dark chocolate are great. Just add and stir some cold water into the bag, then sprinkle the graham cracker crumbs on top (included in the pack) and then let it sit and think for about 10 minutes. This desert must be tried. Amazing stuff.

    For snacks, the normal fare. Dried fruit and beef jerky vacuum seals to very small packs. Leave out the mango and apricots as it makes everything sticky. We love Cliff bars as they can get squished and are not effected by heat. Comes in about 20 flavors. And of course some home made gorp with the larger size M&M's.

    For coffee, only Peet's arabian mocha java or major dickisons blend will do. Order online from Peet's and specify that you want press pot grind. You do this when finalizing the order. Get a french press to take on the trip. I have a stainless model that I got from Campmor. I think they quit carrying that model, but REI and others carry it. GSI also makes some lexan french presses. They work fine, I just preferred the stainless model. Point is, this makes great coffee and it is the perfect way to start a day on a float trip. We get small 16,8,4 ounce nalgene bottles (campmor) and put the coffee, powdered creamer, and sweetener in them. Good stuff man.




    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    that sounds pretty expensive dan but i bet its pretty good. them mountainhouse are like 4-5 bucks a pop



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    Ha ha... Yeah, but I can burn the bag in the fire. You have to carry your chilli can with you
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    Ha ha... Yeah, but I can burn the bag in the fire. You have to carry your chilli can with you
    eh, ill use it for a coffee cup when im done



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    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    Below are some suggestions for lightweight food options on trips where you are not carrying a car cooler.
    "car cooler"

    Typo and I wanted to point it out just to avoid anyone asking me what the hell a car cooler is.





    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt&FishAK View Post
    eh, ill use it for a coffee cup when im done

    Cool for a one day trip


    What about after that?
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    I dont bring heavy food items on back pack trips buddy, its a sin..... on backpacker trips, yea okay we buy the mountainhouse too but darn it hurts the wallet! i thought the guy was talkin about just campin, not backpackin it....if your in a canoe, no worries just bring a trash bag? or mark it and see if it ends up in Japan or California.... I could just use it for a coffee cup the whole trip yea how bout that!



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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt&FishAK View Post
    when i can, i love to have on hand a can of stagg chili, whatever your favorite flavor, a couple of jalapeno cheddar brats or plain ol cheddar brats, and a slab of jalapeno cornbread, all heated to perfection in the pot over the stove or coals and chased with a fine oatmeal stout or india pale ale....You can hardly eat better! makes me happy jus thinkin about it......even better if you can catch yourself a burbot, skin and chop it up into good 1 inch chunks, boil it in half water/ hlaf seven up, then get yourself alittle butter and garlic sauce warmed to dip it in....you doin just fine....im also a big fan of sandbar cooked fish (grayling, dollies, rainbows, and definately salmon)...not to mention grouse and ptarmigan... i always make sure i have a yard of aluminum foil in my pack, with some little bit of seasonings, oh yea..... i can keep going here with fresh moose, goat, sheep, black bear, you name it....i bet i could write a book on this subject. haha
    Goal for 2010 is to slay a burbot to do what you are saying. Cabins suck for fishing....

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt&FishAK View Post
    i thought the guy was talkin about just campin, not backpackin it




    Yeah, you are likely right. I think the OP is asking about "camping" trips. The food is dictated by the type of trip for me. The info I put up top was for remote float trips of 10-13 days with bush plane drop offs. Not the kind of restrictions most folks have to deal with when picking out camp food. Enjoy your can of Stagg chilli, I will stick with my dehyrdated Darn Good brand chilli. Admittingly, your preffered packaging has some inherent benefits over mine


    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    You eat black bear!!! I thought black bear eat you...

    and what is sandbar cooked fish? I'm an aussie and we have plenty of sandbars but have never heard of it. Sounds interesting if it involves eating...

    thanks for the tips

    Hesh

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Anyone that goes into the woods can make a great meal with a fresh caught fish, some spices and a little tinfoil. Usually sea salt, pepper, any butter seasoning and a few coals. I like dollies. Rainbows are nasty up here.

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    Default Sticky Lasagna

    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    One tip, tape a disposable plastic spoon to the lasagna packs. The cheese in them is nearly impossible to get off your standard Lexan spoon. We burn the disposable spoon with the bag the meal was in. Dishes done.
    -Dan

    Dan - I've noticed this too with the Lasagna Mtn Houses. What a darn mess! Have you noticed this with any other meals? I usually just use MRE's but want a little better variety on this years trips, and don't want to pack a pound a spoons. Ha....

    Thanks,
    Jake

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    One of the things I like about canoe camping is you don't have to go ultra light with your cooking, it's easy to fit a small cooler in a canoe, and 5 gallon buckets provide a waterproof container to carry food stuffs, the lid serves as a cutting board, and you pop the lid on the bucket to provide a seat around the cook stove or camp fire.

    We often start the day with pancakes. You can use a mix, or make it from scratch. For scratch, 2c flour, 2T sugar, 1 1/2T baking powder. Put the dry mix in a gallon ziplock bag. Add 2c milk, 2 eggs and 1/3c oil, mix in the bag. Pour the batter out of th edge of the bag on a hot cast iron skillet. Burn the bag when you are done.

    We usually just snack for lunch, hard salmi, cheese, trail mix.

    The best meal we ever had was a dirty rice dish with spruce hen. I cubed the spruce hen breast, breaded it, then browned it in butter. After browning it was removed, rice added to the skillet, various seasonings (basil, paprika, pepper, salt), a can of stewed tomatoes, and the browned meat. It was allowed to simmer until the rice was cooked.

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    black bear can be pretty tasty hesh, depending on the time of year and its diet...if the black bear tries to eat you, just feed him a big ol plate of core-lokt mushrooms

    Mike, rainbows are not nasty up here, you just gotta get em out of the right place....ive had a few that werent very good myself, but seems the parks highway bows are always great eating. dollies are great too but you dont too many of those on the parks.......you can never go wrong though with grayling IMO, when you fry them in the skillet, sometimes they even do a little dance for you. Burbot shoudnt be hard to get Mike, we catch alot of them on the big su, but takes awhile to get a good eater size.....and i always thought there were some in Lake Louise? you mite do well to set out late at nite with some roe or other bait and see if you can get one...ive seen em do it at long lake on the glenn before (open water)

    Dan its not that my food packaging is better than yours, its just that im a cheap SOB Ive never done a float trip yet, unless you count Campbell Creek in midtown Anchorage, and the only food item we bring for that is a case of beer



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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt&FishAK View Post
    Dan its not that my food packaging is better than yours, its just that im a cheap SOB Ive never done a float trip yet, unless you count Campbell Creek in midtown Anchorage, and the only food item we bring for that is a case of beer

    Ha ha...


    Some of my best "float trips" have been day trips involving beer
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Quote Originally Posted by snakeyjake View Post
    Dan - I've noticed this too with the Lasagna Mtn Houses. What a darn mess! Have you noticed this with any other meals?

    Nope. Just the cheese in the Lasagna. Chilli mac and all others are easy enough to clean (lick off). Something about that lasagna though man. Hmm.. makes you wonder. What exactly is in that powdered cheese
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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