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Thread: AMSOIL - Fact or Fiction

  1. #1

    Question AMSOIL - Fact or Fiction

    Who knows the reality of this product. I've tried to find an unbiased test result site, but have been skunked so far. From the outside looking in it looks like good stuff, however, I don't care for the way it's sold. It's like an Amway pyramid structure. Anybody here know anything about this stuff?
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  2. #2
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    Always viewed Amsoil as snake oil but grew tired of purchasing Mercury DI oil for my Optimax at over $40 a gallon. Since we used about 13 gallons on our Koyukuk hunt decided to try Amsoil DI oil last year (a lot cheaper!)
    I couldnt detect any difference from changing brands of oil other than more money in my pocket. Good test for the oil since we put 60 hours on the motor for the trip.

    Check with Dupont Spinner here as he sells it.
    Tennessee

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    I have been running HP injector oil in my boat since 2004, also run the interceptor in my sleds during the winter. Cant say i could tell a whole lot of difference personally in either, plugs stay clean, motors run top notch, and thru the am(way)soil system you can get a good product for a good price.
    buy a 16 gal drum and you can get it for 25-26 bucks a gallon.

    check with Dupont, he can set you up.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default how much per gallon

    I just bought a gallon of Ski-doo rotax synthetic blend for 35$ at AKMD...they will bulk fill it for 30$.....seems like a lot for a gallon of oil......

    the XD30 that I am using in my outboard is pretty costly too.....

    how much if you just buy a couple gallons? I don't really need or want to spend the dough for 16 gallons of each....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    I just bought a gallon of Ski-doo rotax synthetic blend for 35$ at AKMD...they will bulk fill it for 30$.....seems like a lot for a gallon of oil......

    the XD30 that I am using in my outboard is pretty costly too.....

    how much if you just buy a couple gallons? I don't really need or want to spend the dough for 16 gallons of each....
    just checked and buying a 4 gallon case is $118. so almost 30 gallon.
    if you r interested let me know and i will get you a dealers number.

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    They sell it a Napa around here, seems like a fairly standard and resonable way to me.
    You can, if you so desire be a dealer and save some money, try doing that with Chevron, Shell or Mobil products?

    I always thought the dealer set up was kinda weird, but unlike the above mentioned companies, Amsoil is not a Oil Company.

    You can contact Amsoil for reccomendations, try that with a oil company.

    I like their products and do use them, but your right it is diffcult for a end user to really know.

    I have little experience with modern 2 strokes and lube, my experience is mostly 4 strokes, one of the advantages with any synthetic oil is its enginerred, so every molecue is the same size.

    This article can explain it way better than I can

    http://www.machinerylubrication.com/...ventional-oils

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    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    i run amsoil in everything i own, definatley cheaper then other two stroke oils for being full synthetic oil. the DFI oil is fairly cheap. i have never had a problem with it.

  8. #8

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    for those running synthetic 2 stroke oil; Pull your muffler and look at your piston. If you have any coaking at all on the piston top or around the rings, get rid of it as fast as you can.

    I hate synthetic oil in a 2 stroke engine. This is as a high performance builder.

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    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    i have 300 hours on my sport jet running at average 5200 rpm and have been running HP injector since it was broke in on mineral oil.

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    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    I can do HP Injector on bulk for about $22 a gallon(need to confirm drum price), your containers(if you got em). I buy the drum, to get myself the best price and then share.

    I have personally been using Amsoil products since the late '70's/early 80's. Is it better the anything else out there, maybe....I know that Amsoil does not win in every category but wins in overall perfomance. Here is a link to a comparision of motorcycle oils but should give you a good idea of what Amsoil does with their oils.

    https://www.amsoil.com/lit/g2156.pdf

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    Default Another +1 for Amsoil

    Our family has had MANY vehicles with 200-300k miles on them running Amsoil. My parents have been using the stuff since the 70's. I use it in everything, boats, wheelers, trucks, lawn equipment, sleds, etc.. and have not had any engine related problems in my 20 years of using it.
    Look at the frequency of oil changes on a vehicle (every 25k for commuters w/an oil filter change in between) and you might decide it's a real time/money saver for the do-it yourself guy.
    I'm not a dealer or anything, just a confident user. I get all my stuff from the dealer in Palmer.
    BK

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    synthetics let you go longer between oil changes and give slightly better gas mileage because of less friction. only a few make their own so those boat brands of oil are just likely mobil or some other with a different sticker on it and higher price.

    people get so excited over oil brands as oil is one of the few things a consumer can do to influence his engine with maintenance. hardly ever will someones engine go bad because of the brand of oil they use.

  13. #13
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default coaking

    what is coaking?

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    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    what is coaking?
    This is actually the burning of the oil to a sticky ash. Turbo charged engines see this often when they are not allowed to cool prior to shutdown. The oil is no longer circulating and starts to burn inside the turbo shaft bearings.

    Another thing to think about is if the oil is clear or near the same color as when you put the oil in it is not doing it's job. Oil should be picking up carbon deposits, the reason oil turns black, which is a by product of combustion.

    The biggest problem, especially in Alaska, is we allow our vehicles to idle extended periods to warm up. Many times we also take short trips not allowing the engine to come up to proper temperature to evaporate moisture that is naturally occuring in the crankcase. Because of these reasons I do not recommend running Amsoil 25,000 mile or 1 year oil unless the vehicle is driven at least 50 plus miles round trip commute miles to allow to help the evaporation of this moisture.

    I just had my 2000 7.3 Ford valve covers off to do glow plugs and injector o rings and the top end looked brand new after 10 years and 180,000 miles. I have folks that have tried other synthetic oils and found that their vehicles used quarts between changes. Since switching to Amsoil their engines go longer are using oil between changes.

    Bottomline is Amsoil is the only pure synthetic oil, was the 1st synthetic oil. Is it better then the rest like I said above, maybe. I will continue to use it as it has treated me very well. I will always keep an open mind to any new products on the market. The link that I posted above shows that Amsoil was not the best in all categories but overall was the best choice.

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    I believe its "coking", other wise known as carbon-build up, generally less of a problem w/ synthetic based oils compared to mineral based oils.
    Usally w/ synthetics the ratio of oil to gas is a lot less than a mineral based oil But I am not currently involved w/ 2 strokes.
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
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  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    I believe its "coking", other wise known as carbon-build up, generally less of a problem w/ synthetic based oils compared to mineral based oils.
    Usally w/ synthetics the ratio of oil to gas is a lot less than a mineral based oil But I am not currently involved w/ 2 strokes.
    This is not an attack against you at all. I am merely sharing knowledge that I have with those that might want to use it.

    What makes synthetic oil good in a four stroke is what makes it bad for a two stroke. Synthetic oil coats and sticks to metal like nothing else and gives great protection.

    The problem is that in a 2 stroke this layer of oil that sticks becomes a problem for a two stroke. Again you will not find an oil that protects the lower end any better, but where the oil falls out of suspension and coats the piston and rings where the heat is, you will find that the oil turns to carbon and sticks. This leaves carbon on the top of the piston which creates points for pre-ignition problems.

    The other issue pertaining to rings is that the oil that is burning down and the carbon mix together and form a paste that eventually will stick rings in the groove.

    If you pull your muffler on a two stroke engine and you find coking then you need to switch oils, if all else is correct, like carburetor adjustments, jetting and run conditions.

    I AM NOT SAYING THAT ALL SYNTHETIC OILS ARE A PROBLEM IN EVERY CONDITION.

    Here is an easy test to find out if your oil is a problem or not. Using a tachometer, fire up your engine and after it warms up to operating temps. Read the tach and note the RPM. Next switch gas with a mix using a mineral based oil at the same mix ratio. Run the engine using the same procedure. If the engine runs at a higher RPM with no adjustment or you need to lean out the fuel with a carb adjustment then this will tell you that your synthetic oil is not combusting as well in the chamber. This means that the synthetic oil is going to stick to your piston and exhaust port and eventually cause problems.

    You want an oil to lubricate the low end, but you also want it to combust and leave the chamber as exhaust.

    The only synthetic that I like is castor and no more than a 10% mix and that is ONLY when there is alcohol in the fuel. This is because standard mineral based oil does not mix with alcohol and will fall out of suspension. Castor helps keep it mixed.

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    Klickitat,
    I did not take it that way, and I also did not mean to offend anyone, as I mentioned before my knowledge w/ 2 strokes goes back some 35 years, when I was semi-serious about dirt bikes.

    We use to run bean oil, (Castrol R) love the smell, and about that time, to the best of my memeory is when synthetics were coming on the scene. Everyone was skeptical about mixing 50-1 when the norm was 32 or 16 to 1.

    Back in the day, I would jet my elsinore so it burned almost white, there was no carbon buildup and that thing went like stink.

    Nowdays, everythings changed, fuel delivery, motor tolerances, exhaust valves, metalurgy, yada yada, things I have very little experience with.

    But it is hard for me believe a properly jetted 2S with the right mix, would coke up today, but maybe thats the way it is with current equipment?? You have more experience with this than I.
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

  18. #18

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    I used to build high end performance motors and when the new synthetics came on the scene on mass, the problems started showing.

    About 4 years ago I was brought in to consult for a company that builds Unmanned Ariel Vehicles and was having an engine failure rate close to 40%.

    After tearing down about 30 engines and going over everything, I figured out real quick that the synthetic oil was about 70% of their problem. I helped them set up testing procedures and when it was all said and done, the synthetic oils preformed the worst of all the oils tested when it came to coking.

    Now there were some extenuating circumstances that do not apply to every engine and condition. However my experience before this consulting job led me to looking into their oil in the first place. Like I said earlier, this does not apply to every engine, oil or condition. The trick is to inspect your engine after some use and every 100 hours to check for any signs of problems. Also doing a test on your choice of oils to see if it is right for you. I would not rely on what salesmen tell me, that's for sure.

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    Member M. R. Byrd's Avatar
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    I don't have a boat here on the prairie of Kansas, but I have ran Amsoil since 1972 and run it in my farm tractors, irrigation engines, trucks and cars, and my two cycle chain saws and weed trimmers.

    When I became a dealer the company was Amzoil, named after founder Al Amatuzio. There was a potential trademark infringement on the "zoil" in Pennzoil and someone came up with the idea of making the "z" into a "s", but used the sharp corners like in the "z". The logo looked very much the same, but with a new name.

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    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by klickitat View Post
    I used to build high end performance motors and when the new synthetics came on the scene on mass, the problems started showing.

    About 4 years ago I was brought in to consult for a company that builds Unmanned Ariel Vehicles and was having an engine failure rate close to 40%.

    After tearing down about 30 engines and going over everything, I figured out real quick that the synthetic oil was about 70% of their problem. I helped them set up testing procedures and when it was all said and done, the synthetic oils preformed the worst of all the oils tested when it came to coking.

    Now there were some extenuating circumstances that do not apply to every engine and condition. However my experience before this consulting job led me to looking into their oil in the first place. Like I said earlier, this does not apply to every engine, oil or condition. The trick is to inspect your engine after some use and every 100 hours to check for any signs of problems. Also doing a test on your choice of oils to see if it is right for you. I would not rely on what salesmen tell me, that's for sure.
    Synthetic oil has been a known issue with aircraft engines. Amsoil does not produce nor do they even recommend using their oil in any aircraft engine to include the 2 stroke rotax ultralights.

    Also realize that if you do not verify your mix ratio when switching to a synthetic you will find the coking or carbon buildup others are speaking of. This is due in part to the better flow properties of synthetics. When I have new customers switching from other oils I have them run their tanks as close to empty as possible and then refill with synthetic. After a tank full of use I then recommend reading plugs and pistons for possible adjustments. Most engines need little to no adjustment. Snowmachines almost always will need to be adjusted, especially with these the valves and fuel injection systems out there.

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