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Thread: New to AK and starting a garden

  1. #1
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    Default New to AK and starting a garden

    I'm new to AK and I'm starting a garden this year. I live in Anchorage and I was wondering if people could give me a good idea when it is a good time to plant the various plants/seeds here. I am going to try to do-
    Tomatoes, Carrots, Peas, Peppers, Cucumbers, zucchini, crookneck, green beans, potatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, spinach, pumpkins, garlic, onions, and whatever else I am forgetting. I would appreciate any advice. Thanks!

  2. #2

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    I've only been gardening a few years in Anchorage, so I'm by no means an expert. My advice would be to focus on cool season veges (lettuce, carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, spinach, peas, beans, etc). Swiss chard and kahle does very well up here, basically any leafy greens. Folks do grow tomatos in Anchorage but it's is hard to do without a greenhouse. If we get a summer like 2009, it's easier than during a summer like 2008 (pretty cold). Same with peppers, I doubt you'll have much success without a greenhouse. For zucchini, I'd suggest getting them started indoors now. I usually figure Memorial Day (give or take a week) before things are safe to go in the ground, so veges that take longer to develop need a head start. We can have snow / freezing temps by mid-September (not always, but it's possible), so you're basically looking at a 90 days of decent weather before all bets are off.

    What is crookneck, if I may ask?

  3. #3
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    Default Crookneck

    Crookneck is a summer squash like zucchini. It's called crookneck as the neck of it is crooked. It is yellow with a slightly harder skin than zucchini. You may be familiar with it being called summer squash.

  4. #4

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    If you don't have a greenhouse, I would recommend building a small hoop house. I used to have a couple of hoop houses and they really worked great for growing tomatos, peppers and basil. The best part is that you can build a 10' by 4' hoop house for under 20 bucks. I would use 10' pieces of plastic pipe or conduit, anchor one end in the ground and then just bend the other end over and anchor it 4' from the first end, forming an arc. Repeat this with additional pieces of pipe every couple of feet and then lay a sheet of visqueen over the top. I anchored the visqueen on the back side permanently and then just weight the front down to keep the wind from blowing it around. This will let you pull the visqueen back out of the way to work in the garden. Make the ends so you can open them up on warm days and close them on dark days or at night.

    Shearej is spot on about the cold crops doing well outside. Potatos grow well, too. The other stuff likes some heat, which is where the hoop house comes in!

    Good Luck!

  5. #5
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Are you looking to start your plants indoors?
    If so I would start your tomatoes, peppers, broccoli, and cauliflower as soon as possible. Then start your squash and pumpkinsaround the first of may or so.
    Actually you may want to consider buying starts for your tomatoes and peppers.

  6. #6
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    Default Thanks!

    I have bought my tomato plants and probably will buy my peppers and celery. I am starting everything else right now. Still working on that. This has given me good ideas. Thanks!

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