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Thread: Tent-Living in Juneau - Need tent, sleeping bag, & advice

  1. #1

    Default Tent-Living in Juneau - Need tent, sleeping bag, & advice

    Hey all -

    I'm going to be coming up to Alaska as a member of AmeriCorps doing some work in Juneau.

    I'm supposed to bring a tent that I'm going to live out of for 5 months. I am hoping you can recommend me a tent for that purpose.

    I'm looking for a tent that is:

    • No bigger than a 2 person tent
    • Somewhat lightweight - don't need an ultra-light but don't want an 80 pound wall tent either.
    • Extremely water resilient
    • Priced well. I would really prefer to keep it around $200, but will sacrifice a little bit if the next level up is worth it.

    I'm also looking for a sleeping bag recommendation. Obviously I don't want to go with down, so synthetic is my best bet here. Unless there's something better? Also looking to keep this one at about $200.

    If there are any tips on tent living or anything of that nature, I'm all ears.

  2. #2
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    Big Agnes makes some nice bags for around your price range. Check REI-outlet for deals.

    A 2 man will got pretty tight after a few weeks. The few extra pounds may serve you better by providing a bit more room.
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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default tarp it

    I would also put a tarp over it to keep the UV off it if pitched for that long.....not sure how much sun Juneau gets - prolly not much, but if you are in the trees a tarp pitched above the tent will keep the rain and the sun off - if no trees just bungy cord a small tarp to the tent and maybe stake out the backside corners.

  4. #4

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    Than Phish, I will be checking it out.

    Bullelkklr, that was one of the things that the letter said to do. Here is a direct quote from the "equipment list"

    Tent
    A 2-person, 3-Season tent should be sufficient. Remember this is your refuge from rain, place of solitude, your nylon home for months. Choose something that will be able to handle high winds, long periods of rain, and has sufficient mesh to keep out insects. You may wish to seal the seams on older tents or tents that do not have factory seam-sealing. Your local outdoor store will likely have seam sealer.

    A tent with a footprint is recommended. The footprint prevents damage to the bottom of your tent from ground abrasion. If your tent does not have a footprint, you can use a tarp, Visqueen, or Tyvek cut to the size and shape of your tent’s footprint.

    A tent with a full-coverage rain fly is HIGHLY recommended. In addition, a tarp to go over your tent will add rain resistance and add protection from UV damage – UV exposure is high and near constant in the summer and can destroy a rain fly quickly. There is also spray-on UV protectant for tents. Apply prior to arrival.

  5. #5

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    What's your opinion on this tent?

    http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/3...By-Walrus.html

    User-friendly tent utilizes the Rapid Hub system and continuous pole sleeves for quick set-up. Flysheet resists UV degradation and is seam taped for full waterproof protection. Large, pole-supported vestibule with eyelid vents. Ventilation windows on door and two walls. Features gear loft, storage pockets, lantern loops and repairable poles. Packed size 9x22”. Floor area 46 sq.ft. Vestibule area 12 sq.ft. Peak height 3'10”. Packed weight 8 lb. 6 oz. 83x92”. 14 oz. Closeouts. Korea.






  6. #6
    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    I tend to agree with the one that said a 2 man is gonna get tight pretty quick.

    If I had to live in a tent, I'd want one that I could stand up in, without exception. I've done the hunting camp for a week in a backpacking tent, sleeping on a pad on the ground and NEVER AGAIN. If you constantly have to pack it and carry it, then yeah, go with a backpacking tent. If you're going to be able to drive up to where you pitch your tent then you should strongly consider a larger tent with at least a 6 high interior. Also, tarp out over the top and out in the front so you've got a sheltered area for fire, cooking, and sitting out of the weather. It rains a lot in Juneau. You might also consider either one of those mosquito net shelters or just some mosquito netting that you can string up. Not sure how bad the skeeters are in Juneau, but they are bad up here. Inside the tent I'd go with a cot, an air mattress and a good sleeping bag. Have a good camp chair and get a decent camp stove. Backpacking stoves will work, but frankly I have the same attitude about them I do about tents. If I'm in one spot that I can drive to, and I'm not going to be carrying it around, then get a decent sized two burner stove. IMO, ultralight is only good if you're backpacking it.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

  7. #7

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    ERD,

    I will be constantly carrying around the tent in a pack, so yes I will be needing a backpacking tent. As much as I'd like to have a wall tent with a stove, I'm told I will be flying into remote locations (or ferrying) around SE Alaska, and hiking up to 5 miles or so to the work site.

    What kind of pad did you sleep on? I've got both a Thermarest and a foam pad, and I'm thinking I want to grab the foam pad because there's less to go wrong (punctures will not render the pad useless like the Thermarest).

    I will look into getting a skeeter net for the interior. I was in Gustavus for a while and the skeeters weren't too bad, but it was also kind of cold, so maybe they weren't too active.

  8. #8
    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    REI Half-dome 2 tent. I used it on a sheep hunt and a deer hunt last fall, super nice tent and not to spendy.

  9. #9
    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason762 View Post
    ERD,

    I will be constantly carrying around the tent in a pack, so yes I will be needing a backpacking tent. As much as I'd like to have a wall tent with a stove, I'm told I will be flying into remote locations (or ferrying) around SE Alaska, and hiking up to 5 miles or so to the work site.

    What kind of pad did you sleep on? I've got both a Thermarest and a foam pad, and I'm thinking I want to grab the foam pad because there's less to go wrong (punctures will not render the pad useless like the Thermarest).

    I will look into getting a skeeter net for the interior. I was in Gustavus for a while and the skeeters weren't too bad, but it was also kind of cold, so maybe they weren't too active.
    Ah. Well that makes sense then. In that case I would go with some type of free-standing tent in the 4-6 lbs range. I've got an REI halfdome and also a MSR 4-season (I forget which model) and both are freestanding. Since weight is a factor you might look into a sil-tarp to tarp off your camp area, and just a big, lightweight mosquito net to toss over it so you have a mosquito free zone.

    For a pad I use two z-rests but the Ridge-rest would work just as well. Nowadays I'm too old to sleep right on the ground so I'd be more inclined, personally, to get an air mattress like a Therma-rest just for the extra comfort.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

  10. #10
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    Luv the tag line E.R.Dee. Hard to argue with the logic.

    I like the half dome too. I have a semi-cheap knock off that works well, and I like having two doors, each with vestibules. Also getting in and out of a side door is easier than exiting through an end door, but that is probably more of an old man issue.

    Pads are a personal choice that is usually heavily influenced by the number years you have lived. Young folk can make good use of those thin hard foam things, but I stopped using them years ago in favor of a thick self inflating pad. But now I am sufficiently aged to appreciate a real, pump it up, insulated air mattress of at least 3" thickness. I also like it at least 24" wide, and prefer more. In a few more years I plan on progressing to the point of adding a cot underneath the mattress. Not sure what will happen after that, but I'm hoping modern science will by then be able to accommodate my well ripened form.

    I think they've been mentioned, but you should look into a Big Agnes bag. They save weight by having no insulation on the bottom, but add a sleeve to slide your pad into, and that provides the insulation. Bottom bag insulation is pretty worthless since it gets compressed anyway. The weight savings allows you to pack a thicker (think warmer) pad.

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