Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Duct Tape and Super Glue...

  1. #1

    Default Duct Tape and Super Glue...

    Duct tape and Super Glue, Better than band-aids?

    I've started carrying a few feet of duct tape and a small tube of super glue instead of a full-sized first aid kit. Its not deluxe, but from what I'm told, it'll temporarily patch a blister, a good sized cut, assist with splinting a broken bone... I'm not talking about medicines here, but is there a hole in the theory that Duct Tape and Super Glue are sufficient to get you "out of dodge" in terms of first aid needs in the field?

  2. #2
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Valley trash
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    I carry a emergency heat blanket, a small roll of duct tape ( about 15foot) gauze pads, a sterile needle and monofilament ( you never know you mite hafta use it) antiseptic, neosporin,a small candle and a fire-starter. if you cut yourself dressing fish or game, or are bitten by an animal in the field, blood poisoning is the foremost thing to worry about, especially if you are days away from help, that and blood loss.....antiseptic will help, and the duct tape can be used to for a hundred different things. super glue works only on real small cuts, and can lock in bacteria, though there is that new stuff : Nu-Skin that is a antiseptic and liquid bandage and works pretty good. one even has a pain reliever in it now.



    Release Lake Trout

  3. #3
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Thumbs down Myths

    Search this board. The super-glue myth has been beat to death many times over. Super glue is pretty much worthless for any field wound care.

    If you have room to pack a roll of duct tape, you have room to take a real first aid kit instead and cut over half the weight in the process.

    I know that entertainment TV is a great pastime, but I'm sorry to say that "blood poisoning" is not a concern with the injuries you'd likely get in the woods. Bleeding to death is the highest concern. That is followed by infection and abscess. Over a considerable length of time (days) of having a severe infection without treatment, you could potentially develop sepsis. Sepsis is the proper name for what was referred to in the 1800's as "blood poisoning".
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  4. #4
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Valley trash
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Search this board. The super-glue myth has been beat to death many times over. Super glue is pretty much worthless for any field wound care.

    If you have room to pack a roll of duct tape, you have room to take a real first aid kit instead and cut over half the weight in the process.

    I know that entertainment TV is a great pastime, but I'm sorry to say that "blood poisoning" is not a concern with the injuries you'd likely get in the woods. Bleeding to death is the highest concern. That is followed by infection and absess. Over a considerable length of time (days) of having a severe infection without treatment, you could potentially develop sepsis. Sepsis is the proper name for what was referred to in the 1800's as "blood poisoning".

    i dont watch tv....maybe once in a long while when i stop by to drink a beer at a friends house.....and usually its only UFC pay per views fights or football games.......thanks for correcting me on the "sepsis" term. bottom line is bring something containing antiseptic as a precaution.... .....if you slip and cut yourself while skinning something ( most of us have done this one time or another), it may help to prevent said infection



    Release Lake Trout

  5. #5
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    Nothing personal intended. It's been a long time since I've heard anyone use the term "blood poisoning" and I thought it was kind of amusing.

    Stop the bleeding. Keep the wound clean. If the wound got dirty, flush it out. You don't have to use "sterile" stuff. Regular bottled water is plenty good enough to flush out a wound. Then cover it up with a clean dressing. It is usually best to leave the wound open and covered with gauze than to try and seal it off with glue, non-porous tape, or needle/thread. Allowing drainage prevents an abscess from forming.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  6. #6
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Valley trash
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    very true indeed.....yea the blood poisoing is amusing but it can happen, wait, correction- "sepsis" can happen......better save as much of your bottled drinkin water as you can though, as you cant always find good water, or any water even



    Release Lake Trout

  7. #7

    Default

    I am a second for having Nu-skin in a 1st aid kit. Used it many times.

  8. #8

    Default

    Hey, I'm all for carrying a full-blown first aid kit. I just don't think you can fit one into a "back pocket" survival kit. What I'm asking is weather or not a few feet of Duct Tape can keep you alive if used as a bandage. Or weather or not "super glue stitches" can help get you home after you accidentally plunged your knife into your hand.

  9. #9
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    Duct tape will not stick to wet, bloody flesh any better than anything else. I do not see any advantage to carrying duct tape over made-for-purpose medical tape and some gauze pads/rolls.

    Super glue will not close a wound any better than some butterfly or steri-strips. In fact, closing a wound PROPERLY with super glue is a very complicated task and rarely works very well.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  10. #10
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Valley trash
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    Joats got a great point on the duct tape vs medical tape.....medical tape is much smaller roll and it works for what it is designed to do....I actually carry both in my truck (along with a first aid kit), and i carry a small roll of 1/2 medical tape in my pocket when im working, this is due to an accident i had this last december while walkin a 20 ft high scaffold along a concrete block wall with 3 inch high steel stickin out the top every other cell, while carryin a corner lead block (50lbs) in one hand and a bucket of water in the other, a 4 foot section of scaffold board dropped under me, i dropped the block, grabbed the top of the wall and sliced my wrist with the edge of the steel, 3 inches vertically down my wrist, i dont how it happened: it just did....i managed not to fall and got myself back on the scaffold after droppin the water, very close call..... the was a lot of blood, and there wasnt a single first aid kit of roll of anything useful on the whole job site! took me about 15 minutes to control and stop the bleeding, it came very close to the vein....Left a gnarly scar for sure that ill always carry, and I had to go get a tetanus shot becuz of the steel rebar. Always be prepared!



    Release Lake Trout

  11. #11

    Default

    in my hunting daypack i carrie a full blown gunshot blowout kit with all the items need in own case ..for me to use or on another person who been shot ..i learned a few lesson the hardway when hunting and i now i carry some type of kit in that area..

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    335

    Default may be for you super glue doesn't work well

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Duct tape will not stick to wet, bloody flesh any better than anything else. I do not see any advantage to carrying duct tape over made-for-purpose medical tape and some gauze pads/rolls.

    Super glue will not close a wound any better than some butterfly or steri-strips. In fact, closing a wound PROPERLY with super glue is a very complicated task and rarely works very well.

    I have been using super glue for years .
    I wash out the wound with collidial silver, dry it off and glue it all together and dont have to bandaid it at all which means it can breathe naturally and not leave a scar or minimal scaring . I have had deep cuts that have severed nerves and all has healed well (except the nerves of corse). Duct tape is useful in so many other things during emergencies . Before I started working for one boss I had , they used duct tape to repair holes on wave runners on the hull under the water line, just to get another rental out of them. When I took over repairs I did regular glass work doing the job right . If the serface is dried well the duct tape does well in adverse conditions for while . Anything is better than nothing in an emergency and none of it is perminant.My son introduced me to gourilla tape , which is tougher and stronger and a little more expensive, but worth it . handles and tools in the back pack are wraped with it so that it is handy in the field.

  13. #13
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    Ugg!

    Colloidal Silver is toxic and should never be put inside a wound. Don't even get me started on such witch doctor medicine. Spend a couple bucks and get anti-biotic ointment at the grocery store instead.

    Super glue is waterproof & non-breathable. A band-aid will always "breath" better than super glue. Super glue is also toxic and will kill the tissue it comes in contact with. Thus it is very important that you don't get any super glue on the inside of a wound. It is used to glue the outer edges of a near-surgical laceration back together. The use window for super glue is very narrow. Improper use will lead to an abcess sealed inside the wound, which can result in a course of antibiotic (and perhaps even IV antibiotics) treatment and a incision and drain procedure at the emergency room... plus a thousand dollar bill to go with. Just use a band-aid or gauze and medical tape.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Ugg!

    Super glue is also toxic and will kill the tissue it comes in contact with.
    Super glue kills any tissue it comes in contact with?

  15. #15
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    If left in place, yes. You can put a drop of superglue on your skin and let it dry. The top layers of skin under the glue will die and shed away. If you put the glue inside the wound, it will kill the subcutaneous and even muscle tissue it is contacting. Having dead tissue sealed up under the skin is what leads to infection and then abscess. We can use it on the outer skin layer because that is going to die and shed anyway.

    When you use superglue on callous tissue (e.g. dog's foot pads) you are dealing with essentially "dead" tissue, so it doesn't cause any problems. When we use it to close up a surgical wound, we are putting the glue on the outer layer of skin along the edge of the wound on each side. The wound is pushed closed and the outer edges of the top skin layer is the only part actually glued together. That skin will evenually shed off anyway, but it will hold long enough for the incision under it to heal.

    The misconception is that you put the glue inside the wound and push it closed. That is the worst thing you can do to any cut.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  16. #16

    Default

    Ok. Basically, do it right and you've got a good temporary "stitching". Do it wrong (and leave it that way) and you're going to be much worse off than you would've been...

  17. #17
    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    725

    Default

    Duct tape has it's uses. I carry it and a SAM splint for breaks. We've used it, it works great. Put the SAM splint in the appropriate position to support the break, then use the duct tape to stiffen the SAM, wrapping around in strips, not too tight but tight enough to support. It's basically a field cast.

    If I have the room I carry a full blown back country med kit. But when I have to go ultralight, I carry these four items:
    -Duct tape
    -SAM Splint
    -Maxipad (will absorb more blood than gauze and is sterile if kept in package). Wrap around wound and apply pressure and will stop most bleeding.
    -QuikClot (to stop major bleed)

    Between those four items I'm covered for a lot of different injuries. I'm more comfortable carrying my full kit but you can't always have the luxury so that's what I've paired it down to for when I have to go light.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •