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Thread: Nor Vise ?

  1. #1

    Default Nor Vise ?

    Last season I made a trip to Yakutat and brought my Renzetti Master vise with me. It was great to be able to tie up some flies around camp and chat with guys while making up some new patterns. Other guys got into the tying and we had a great time. Then, this season, I'm getting my stuff out, and for the life of me cannot find my vise. I know it's somewhere "safe", I just don't know where. Anyways, I ordered up a new Nor-Vise just a few minutes ago and was hoping anybody with some experience on one can give me any inside pointers or tips. It obviously looks like a different creature than the Renzetti, but looks like a serious, high production type vise, which is what I was after. Any ideas and tips are highly appreciated. I'll have the Nor-vise in Yakutat this year now, so if anybody is down there, stop in and chat and tie up some flies if you want.

  2. #2
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default

    Seems there are some videos on the Nor vise website or on Youtube. I saw the guy that invented it at The Flyfishing Show in Marlboro,Mass last year. It is an amazing vise and the bobbins are super cool. Perhaps a bit of a learning curve, but I would imagine that is one fly tying machine in the right hands.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  3. #3
    Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    Default

    It's a very well built vise, but it takes time getting use to the rotary feature, thread post and bobbin.

    I've had trouble using the dubbing table, but Norm now has a video on youtube for that option and I also got a few tips from him at the show. This one was total operator error!

    Though I would buy another, I do have a few gripes. The cutting board table was warped, so it never sat flat. I solved this by flipping the table over, removing the old feet and using hot melt glue on the four corners. I let the glue set for about a minute, but still soft. I then turned it back upright and let the glue adjust for level. The lights that he sells are a waste of money. I bought the small travel one, which he no longer sells. We talked about it Friday and he readily admitted it never was very bright and the new one he now offers isn't much better. I would suggest a $50 rechargable Ott-lite! My biggest issue however was the way the vise would twist on the post; drove me crazy wrapping zonker strips and having the head moving around. Just felt cheesy. Didn't make much sense to have a round set screw tighten on a round post. I machined a full length flat spot in the post and also the base. Now I can really crank on the screw and it stays much tighter. Also by machining flats on the base, I was able to put a wrench on the base while I tightened the screw on the bottom of the board. While I was at it, I also did the same for the thread post, though it didn't really need it. I also added a rubber gasket between the post base and table. I found this to be another area where the post would turn. If you look closely on the vise post, you can see the outline of the set screw about a 1/2 inch up from the base and also the orange gasket below the base! Hopefully the pics will show what I'm talking about.

    Eventhough I might seem down on the vise, I do like it and would buy another if I packed it away somewhere safe and couldn't find it George Riddle may have the most experience of anyone on the this forum using the vise. I think Norm and his son even went out to Blueberry Lodge a few years back.







  4. #4
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default thanks...

    Dear God, now I want one myself
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  5. #5
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    Default Like it

    I like mine a lot. It makes everything faster, hackle, chenile, wraps. palmering, and you can reinforce everything. It allows you to wrap thread around the core(stem) of your hackle and its bullet proof. It takes a lot of getting used to tho. Once you get it though it comes in handy. The dubbing process is much easier as well, you don't need wax or anything like that.

  6. #6

    Default Thanks

    Thanks for the information guys, I knew there was a handful on here using the Nor-vise. Wyatt, I like those modifications and if I have any issues like that with mine, I'll have to send it off to my father to machine it for me. I have the C-clamp for mine, for traveling, so hopefully it stays put. I'll be sure to watch all the YouTube videos when I get home today, they sound very handy. Odd how I can't find that Renzetti though...I know it's around there somewhere

  7. #7

    Default

    The vise is the best going, there is no comparison IMO. The dubbing brush table is awesome! On mine I have a box that holds the vice when taken down along with a few materials and tools. The vise screws into the top of the box when put back together. It makes about the best travel kit I have ever seen. I will post pictures of it if you want to build one for yourself or get one made. I have never had any problems with it spinning as Wyatt mentioned.

    If you tie a lot of large flies the large jaws are the way to go, the larger and heavier brass pieces give it enough inertia to spin much longer than the regular ones. Although I have only been tying on it for about a year, the learning curve was very steep and this year at the sportsman's show Norm asked me to do some tying for him to give him a break.

    When I first started tying on it I did have a couple of problems though. First, getting the hook shank to spin perfectly like Norm does is tough, but after a lot of practice it was easy to get. It does take a lot of hook repositioning, and a few times I just gave up and dealt with the hook wobble. Second, switching from the traditional tying style to the rotary style was tough and I didn't use the rotary feature to its full potential.

    Good luck on your new vise, after some practice I am sure you will love it!
    Riley

  8. #8

    Default Rotary Vises

    I've tied on a few rotaries in the past and eventually went with the Renzetti Master setup. It's been a very nice setup...just wish I could find it. I've always wanted a different setup for traveling and the Nor-Vise looks like it will be a handy travel vise. I think I might need to add another clamp to my order though, I didn't realize I'd need an extra for the thread holder. I'm almost wondering if my Renzetti thread holder arm will fit onto the Nor-Vise post? It would be much handier (maybe) for travels since it is light and simple. I should hopefully have it in 4 days or so and will get to work figuring out how to spin the materials. I've been watching all of the videos on YouTube and they're pretty handy. I don't tie any monster salt-water flies, but will probably get the larger jaws down the road if I get into larger hooks. Thanks again for all the input, now I'm even more excited to use the vise.

  9. #9
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    Default it's a machine

    I really like mine. I used a Regal for years, but things are SOOO much faster with a Nor-Vise. The auto-bobbin and the ability to spin to lay down your base layer accounts for most of my speed gain.

    I can tie better, more durable flies, faster, with it as well. I also really like being able to tie flies like the hairball leech and rabbit fur flesh flies withough having to use the water-absorbing hide of the rabbit strip. I just make up a bunch of dubbing brushes (using the dubbing table) and I get the effect without the waterlogged weight.

    For most of what we tie up here I use the standard jaws most of the time. If you're going to tie small dries and nymphs you might want to invest in the midge jaws.

  10. #10

    Default Good info

    I kind of figured the base layer and anything that typically requires lots of "rotary" action would be made quicker with the Nor-vise. Norm emailed me saying that he put 2 table clamps in my order, so I was happy about that, since now I'll be able to use the thread holder in camp at the end of the month.

    AKGrayling,
    If you get the time, I'd like to see a photo of your box you made. If you want, you can email me as well if you prefer: snowcamoman@gmail.com

    Thanks everybody for the tips and information, this is all handy stuff to know.

  11. #11
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Dumping that Renzetti anytime?

    If so, shoot me a PM.

    My one hesitation with NorVise is the bulky setup and for that reason, I travel with a much more compact vise. But for all the production reasons given, Norlander's vise is quite the machine. My favorite trick is reinforcing peacock herl into chenille for Prince Nymphs, which I fish a lot. But all of the tips in his website videos are worth viewing.

    Lessons learned? The bobbins are slick - but learning how then loading a bunch at the beginning would have made my early days easier.

    Have fun. And...keep me in mind on that Renzetti?

  12. #12

    Default Renzetti

    6XLeech,
    Sorry, but I don't think I could ever really part with the Renzetti. I love that vise and it can do anything for any sized hook I'll ever fish. I didn't realize the Nor-vise was so bulky. I'll have to evaluate my weight situation for flying to Yakutat and see if the Nor or the Renzetti will go now (Given that I can find the Renzetti) before I leave. The Renzetti does pack down pretty small once the arm is moved in. The reinforcing peacock herl and hackles is something that looks very interesting, I hate when a perfectly good fly pops a hackle and is shot too early.

  13. #13
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Shucks...

    No snowcamoman, it never sounded like you were quitting the Renzetti.

    The Norvise bulk is only due to the mounting board. I made my mount from an old piece of white shelf board, which works very well. If I could find a board with another application (cutting board?) that worked fine with a couple of countersunk holes underneath, then no biggie to pack the Norvise, but I leave the Norvise at home, using it mostly for winter "production" tying. I don't need "the machine" capability on trips and travel with a little Griffin.

    For guys (or ladies) who tie a lot, a Norvise is a great piece of additional equipment that makes tying a lot of flies easier. For many folks who tie all their flies, learning the Norvise is worth it. Not necessary, but worthwhile. Mine was a gift, but there's enough "fun factor" plus the efficiency of using it that I think I would replace it if it went missing.

  14. #14

    Default 6X

    I picked up the table clamps for the travel idea with the Nor-vise, so hopefully they will work decent at camp locked onto a table. For home use, I'll probably put together the board idea like you and Wyatt posted. I like haveing a pedestal type base at home. It did feel a bit funny to be sitting around camp last year spinning flies on the Renzetti Master though. Another guy saw it and right away wanted to jump in and tie with it...pretty funny stuff. He spun out a bunch of black leech patterns in no time as we drank strong coffee and discussed Situk patterns.

  15. #15
    hap
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    Bob Fairchild wrote the fly of the month for the AK Fly Fishers for years and has developed what he considers the perfect travel kit for weight and portability. He uses a wood block to replace the pedestal base and has experimented with just how big the block needs to be.

    It is a great exercise to fine tune your tying skills and thread control. Bob uses a piece of wood just a hair larger than a credit card. He found a base about the size of a hackle gauge was actually enough, but card size gives him more fudge factor. That is obviously going to extremes, and a Nor-Vise is about speed and getting away with all sorts of stuff... But the base screws are extremely adequate for holding the posts.

    Riley ties most flies with 8/0 Uni on the Nor-Vise and seldom breaks thread when things are going well. Tie with light thread for a while (and then stay with it! ) if you have any issues with tipping vises or turning posts.

    I have seen new tyers literally pull over quality pedestal vises!
    art

  16. #16

    Default







    The clips in the middle of the box hold the vise and the thread holder. They snap in and don't go anywhere. I then stack my materials on top of them which holds them in even better. I really like the box except for when I have a lot of materials on top of it and I need to get into the box. I would like to make it a drawer so I can get things out of inside it easily. The vise is secured to the top of the box with wing nuts, which makes it easy to take down and put back together.

  17. #17

    Default Nice Work

    AKGrayling,
    That's a really slick setup you have there. I might have to break out some wood working tools and make me one of those this fall after things slow down. Thanks for posting those photos.

  18. #18
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    Snocaveman,
    The best advise with your new Nor-Vis is get a bobbin threader cause you will need it for the first 2 dozen flies till you get in the habit of hooking your pinky finger on the spool of the bobbin. Once you get that the rest will fall into place. The beauty of pulling the bobbin away to the post is awesome.

    With the dubbin table, get an old bobbin and use it for the fine wire spool. This will give you the weight to hold the tension on the lower wire.

    There are a few Nor-visors out there and AFF fly tying monthly get together will usually have one of us.

    I am thinking on doing a presentation on why everyong should have a thread post attached to the fly tying station. If and when you get yours we could get together and tie someplace. I have a blue tote that you get at Fred Meyers with a lid that the tying station fits nicely down and can be transported to and around the house/tying get-together. Remember, keep the plinky wrapped around the thread spool....

    George

  19. #19

    Default

    George,
    Thanks, I really appreciate the tips. I figured that bobbin would take some getting used to, now you've helped confirmed it would. Where do you usually hold your monthly fly tying get together? I'm in Fairbanks, but wouldn't mind trying to schedule a Anchorage area trip to coincide with a tying meeting.

  20. #20
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default That...

    Quote Originally Posted by AKGrayling View Post
    ... The vise is secured to the top of the box with wing nuts, which makes it easy to take down and put back together.
    ...is cool, AK Grayling! One of the best, functional solutions ever. What is that white veneer on top? The shelf board I'm using has that stuff and it's great - easy to see items on it and easy to clean.

    You find those extra jaws very useful?

    Thanks for posting the photos. Great stuff.

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