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Thread: which type of hunting/hiking boot

  1. #1
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    Default which type of hunting/hiking boot

    I'm need of good hike/ hunting boot. just wondering what you would buy. I was thinking about going all out and buy a pair of kenetrek. I looked at them at the sportman show and whated some of other than a sales man to give me there thoughts Thanks Mike

  2. #2

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    What type of hunting do you plan on doing?? What model of Kenetrek? More important than the name or logo on the side of the boot is the fit to YOUR foot. I don't care if its the latest and greatest uber keep your foot dry no blister maker walking on cloud all day long boot. If it doesn't fit your feet well it won't be comfortable after several miles of hauling a pack load. Best to try on several brands of boots and find whatcha like. If you are looking and splurging on Kenetrek mountain hunters (or something like that) that price range will get you into many high quailty boots. Like Lowa Sheephunters (hunter extreme GTXs), Scarpa Liskhamms, some nice La Sportivas, upper end Asolo just to name a few. Don't just try on one brand of boot if possible try on as many as possible.

    Good luck.

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    I'm going to afognet this fall for elk and i'm going to have to hike more than i normaly do and I need new boots my danners i wore for the last 3 season are done. So I'm looking i would say for a lot of hiking and packing i hope. The kenetrek fit good but loose around the toe. I going to splurg on a good pair.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    What type of hunting do you plan on doing?? What model of Kenetrek? More important than the name or logo on the side of the boot is the fit to YOUR foot. I don't care if its the latest and greatest uber keep your foot dry no blister maker walking on cloud all day long boot. If it doesn't fit your feet well it won't be comfortable after several miles of hauling a pack load. Best to try on several brands of boots and find whatcha like. If you are looking and splurging on Kenetrek mountain hunters (or something like that) that price range will get you into many high quailty boots. Like Lowa Sheephunters (hunter extreme GTXs), Scarpa Liskhamms, some nice La Sportivas, upper end Asolo just to name a few. Don't just try on one brand of boot if possible try on as many as possible.

    Good luck.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    If the kenetreks were loose in the store they will only get looser in the field. That is my chief complaint about them. After they get wet and handle the loads I put on them going up and down hills w/ a pack they stretch to the point that I can't get them tight. The eyelets are literally touching.

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    Default

    Hey ive never had any trouble with browning boots....hunted sheep, goat, moose, bear, deer and they are fully water proof up to the tops as long as you dont linger in the creek....if you do, they dry fast, and they have great tread and are very well made IMO....i paid $140 i think.....Ask Kotton as he can tell you more hes had at least 2 pairs of them.



    Release Lake Trout

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt&FishAK View Post
    Hey ive never had any trouble with browning boots....hunted sheep, goat, moose, bear, deer and they are fully water proof up to the tops as long as you dont linger in the creek....if you do, they dry fast, and they have great tread and are very well made IMO....i paid $140 i think.....Ask Kotton as he can tell you more hes had at least 2 pairs of them.
    Have you tried Lowa, Scarpa, Meindle or other high end boot? While I am not disputing your success with those browning boots, I must say that if you switched to a properly fitted premium mountaineering boot you would look back at any of the common "hunting boots" and wonder how you every thought they were "good".

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    Default Hobbit feet

    Unfortunately for me I have to buy what I can find that fits. I wear 7 1/2 eeee and most styles do not come in that size. Very hard to find well made boots for me.

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    Default limmers

    Mike after guiding for years and having had almost every brand out there I found Limmers. Do yourself a favor and check them out before you buy ANYTHING else. I hike a lot, and nothing I have ever worn even comes close! I have had mine for two years now, hunted sheep, goats moose you name it, in all kinds of weather. They are made to last, and even though they dont have goretex I have never had wet feet yet. The leather is twice as thick as other boots and does take some breaking in but man they are worth it. Mine cost $300 bucks.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default Babar!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Diashan View Post
    Unfortunately for me I have to buy what I can find that fits. I wear 7 1/2 eeee and most styles do not come in that size. Very hard to find well made boots for me.
    Wow, you have baby elephant feet! You may want to give Hanwags a call and see what they can do for you. They are supposed to be pretty darn impressive for fitting freakish feet.

    http://www.hanwag.de/schuh-kategorie.php?cat_id=1

  10. #10
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    Default And insoles for versatility...

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    What type of hunting do you plan on doing?? What model of Kenetrek? More important than the name or logo on the side of the boot is the fit to YOUR foot. I don't care if its the latest and greatest uber keep your foot dry no blister maker walking on cloud all day long boot. If it doesn't fit your feet well it won't be comfortable after several miles of hauling a pack load. Best to try on several brands of boots and find whatcha like. If you are looking and splurging on Kenetrek mountain hunters (or something like that) that price range will get you into many high quailty boots. Like Lowa Sheephunters (hunter extreme GTXs), Scarpa Liskhamms, some nice La Sportivas, upper end Asolo just to name a few. Don't just try on one brand of boot if possible try on as many as possible.

    Good luck.
    1. Fit: +1 on the importance of the right fit first. Manufacturers build their boots on a model foot or "last" and to me, finding the right shoe/boot is first finding the company who's using a last that's similar to my foot. I bought a good pair of Asolos years ago; great boot but discovered only later (hiking on slopes) how sore my Big Toe/metatarsal joint got. The boot seems to flex at a point that doesn't match my foot on steeper grades or something. In the past, once I found a company with a good fit, then other shoes by the same company worked out well. I hope this is true with hiking boots too. Not Asolo for me though. The other things I've started doing with footwear is trying them on with either extra socks or an insole - which gives some flexibility to adjust for minor fit issues, stretch or swelling.

    2. More support: Support usually means more weight, but seems to be important for the foot arch (and small muscles) with heavier loads. Better ankle support seems to become a factor on slopes and gets better with better, higher top hiking boots. The extra weight of more support has to be worth it, but the more demanding (longer distances, steeper slopes, uneven surfaces) the actual walking/hiking, then the more I would tend to spend on better-support in hiking boots. Lowa, Scarpa, Asolo, LaSportiva are mountaineering boots favored by sheep hunters because the foot and ankle demands of climbing and sidehilling.

    3. Longer-term goals: Seems you can make arguments for spending more bucks on anything, but one of my goals is to remain active and good footwear seems like an investment in just that. While it's true that no one piece is perfect for all conditions/situations and the more specialized gear is, the less well it does other tasks, but in one of the better explanations of foot biomechanics and hiking boots I read (See "A" below) suggested convincingly that most of us would be better off in a light mountaineering boot (more support) based on the loads we carry (over 35#) or rough terrain - the goal being fewer foot problems down the road:

    "Heavyweight Backpacking Boots (lightweight mountaineering boots)
    H e a v y w e i g h t backpacking boots are designed to be used when carrying loads greater than 35 pounds or when traveling over rock, snow or ice. This category of boots also shares many of the same features as mountaineering boots"


    I couldn't find any computer program that takes my measurements and spits out the right boot for the job, but maybe it doesn't always take the perfect boot either. The right fit/support/weight/expense mix is just something we ponder and maybe learn about. In the end, we just try one and make the best of it... til next season anyway.

    Good luck.

    A.aapsm.org/pdf/hikeclimb-1.pdf
    B. http://h1ker.com/how-to-pick-hiking-boots/
    C. http://www.podiatrym.com/news2.cfm?id=7084&start=1

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