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Thread: Inflatable Kayak

  1. #1

    Default Inflatable Kayak

    Looking for a inflatable Kayak primarily for lake use, Would like to capacity for 2 to try and keep up with wifes Perception Sea Kayak hard shell. Looking at Aire Tandem Tomcat &
    Sawtooth need help in choosing one. The Sawtooth has a fixed rudder, and is a lot more
    money. REI has the Tomcat on sale now.

  2. #2
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    It's going to be really difficult keeping up with a hard shell in any IK. None of them are fast enough.

  3. #3

    Default Inflatable K

    I realize that but would like to take it moose hunting too. And need somthing portable, looking for one that tracks well and fast for a IK. And by moose hunting having somthing to get across a lake or mild river and ferry a quarter at a time.

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    Self-Bailing 2-person tandem inflatable kayaks are an versatile/packable way to go for most of what it appears the utility you want it for.

    While having no chance (in any of them) matching hull and wind condition efficiencies of the hard shell mentioned... it would not be a deal-breaker on the short duration lake outings that are often not all that far to go or too windy.

    I'll relate that the Tomcat will give better shallow drafting and greater utility over the Sawtooth's skegging of different geometry. This will also lead to less damage in shallower conditions plus be more forgiving to hop into. The Sawtooth should provide better into the wind and v-hull tracking over the Tomcat in flatwater.

    Another factor to take note of is that both the Tributary inflatables you mentioned are no where near the quality of Parent Company AIRE. These particular Tribs have a known shelf life even while still new in the box or when rarely used and well taken care of. Tho' easy to repair... 'Vinyl' bladders, sewn seams, lesser zippers construction all lead to some issues (minor to major) in 3-5 years. Resale value is low. These are use 'em and toss 'em out over much shorter life spans of less investment at get-go. All the parent company AIRE boats will easily go 15+ years and under warranty for ten. Retained value is good.

  5. #5

    Default

    Thanks, that is the info. I was looking for. REI has a great price on the Tomcat right now.
    Around $500. I had the Aire Super Puma for 10 and realize that the Tributary is not a Aire
    in durability but. I baby my stuf and it should not see much us or wear. Are there any others I should consider?

  6. #6

    Default Tomcats

    I have Aire boats as well as Tribs. The Tomcat is great for the price, but here's the good part, they are easy to repair and you don't do it often. When stitching starts unraveling or an abrasion appears, grab your aqua-seal and go at it. The damaged area will be tougher than ever. I have used these boats on alot of streams and they can take punishment.
    But as Brian said earlier, the Aire is even better.
    Mark

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    I'm on same page with ya at $500 and what Markoathout said is right on... repair is easy & a few pointers on repair stuff w/ better kit is all ya need here.

    $500 is a trigger pull no question get it... w/ possibly letting you open the factory box to see year of manufacture (recall what I said "shelf life" of vinyl) --- then ask if it is a factory second.

    Also make absolutely certain to fill out warranty registration card, make a copy for yourself, and send it to AIRE in Idaho. Any fix it help, kit, precautions, or repair needs I can talk here, by phone, or demonstrate right in front of ya. Run out - get 'er done - and have some fun!

    Cheers

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    If you're not doing any serious whitewater in it, the Aire Super Lynx is a faster boat that tracks better. Certainly not cheap, but it is a better multipurpose boat, as long as one of those purposes doesn't include more than a rarely occasional class III.

  9. #9

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    Well I ordered a Aire Tomcat from REI. One concern is the lack of a rudder in the wind, could you adapt a Sawtooth style rudder or is there a aftermarket rudder available?

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    I have no experience with inflatable kayaks/canoes but am wondering.............how in the world do you get out of these? It looks like it is a serious pita to get out.
    I am guessing even when crusing around slow when hunting you would have to wear chest waders?
    Tennessee

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    Quote Originally Posted by kk alaska View Post
    Well I ordered a Aire Tomcat from REI. One concern is the lack of a rudder in the wind, could you adapt a Sawtooth style rudder or is there a aftermarket rudder available?
    Yes... we make a very nice easily removable 'skeg' for your inflatable Kayak. Best thing here to bring your new boat in... we can see where you plan to sit and place gear.

  12. #12
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    Default getting out of small inflatable kayaks and canoes

    I like to use the paddles as a brace. when using a kayak paddle, I pull as close along side the shoreline I want to exit the boat.
    Then I place the kayak paddle behind me. One blade on shore, I find a place on my boat rigght behind my sitting position that I can hold onto and the paddle at the same time. I put my weight on the paddle shaft that is on shore and then lift my body up using my arms. this holds the boat secure and it won't slip of move. keeping constant pressure is key so everything stays stable. then put one foot out and then the other. then you can stand up.. you can get back in your craft using the same techinque except of course backwards than the exit.. \
    I was watching old Nanook of the north do it, and he just jabs his paddle in front of his kayak into good solid media in the water and braces his weight on that to support him as he exits the Kayaky. How many people can you put in your Kayak??? what this...
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZfEm9gGtjfw
    If we all started paddling our Kayaks today, and paddled every chance we got the rest of our lives... we still would not have kayaked as much as those old Eskimos... they had it figured out.. the kayad were just and extension of their bodies..
    they paddled hundreds of miles over open seas to hunting grounds and islands and destinations unknown...
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  13. #13

    Default Kayak Paddles?

    What length and recommendations for Kayak paddles for my Tomcat inflatable? Was at REI
    looking today.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kk alaska View Post
    What length and recommendations for Kayak paddles for my Tomcat inflatable? Was at REI
    looking today.
    220, 225 UP TO 230 cm is about where ya wanna be. Shorter lengths will cause your body to twist plus raise your arms/hands... this effects efficiency, power, center of balance, and recovery response.

    2 pc. and 4 pc. I'd recommend... this puts a price-tagging from inexpensive to gettin' up there.

    Could go into symmetrical vs. A-sym. and flat face, to curves to dihedral... depends on what you are mostly making mileage on in terms of performance, power face primary strokes, subtle secondary strokes, or forgiveness characteristics.

    Several great brands and models, yet also a lot of junk that may even appear good looking.

    Wood, metal, plastic, composite glass, or combination of these materials can all fit your needs... I like composites due to ferule fit (hot or cold days)+(sand or ice), warmer hands, less up-keep, lighter, more snappy, plus the greater efficiency with power gains.

  15. #15

    Default IK Paddle

    For lake paddling the longer paddle may be better, but for moving water I'm not sure if I see it that way, yes it is recommended, but here it goes.

    I used to use a 220cm, have switched, and have used a 200cm bent shaft for two seasons, and to be honest, I prefere the shorter paddle. If anything, the shorter paddle forces a boater to lean forward to place the paddle in the water, you should be doing this anyway. The problem is in the brace, a longer paddle allows the boater to reach out further from their boat, which allows more leverge and power when bracing off of the water, to right up. An IK being wider, has a tendency when on edge, to keep right on going over unless you have either, a powerful brace, or a fast brace, or the two in combination. The shorter paddle allows faster movement which in turn can head off problems before they get started. I do have fairly long arms and this helps, but others I boat with are going the same route. The longer paddle now seems awkward and slow, and in all honesty, I feel no loss in power, but instead have a much quicker, cleaner, response time.

    For a 220cm try the Werner Desperado, a two piece carbon fiber,which is light, and strong, I do like mine, but I now use a Werner Powerhouse. Another great paddle in 200cm is the Adventure technology bent shaft. They have an affordable nylon bladed paddle that has the best grip "feel when holding" on any paddle iv'e used. The handle is slightly offset or oblonged and you can really feel it in your hand, and know if it has turned in your hand. This is, really nice for hardshells when you flip and your paddle spins in your hand, you can correct your grip positioning, by feel, before you try and roll up.
    Buying a paddle leaves the consumer with alot of choices, which is good, so try some different types, and use what works for you.

    It's spring,
    Mark

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    Count me as another paddler that prefers a shorter than usually recommended paddle for IK's. I have somewhat short arms and still like the paddle a little on the short side for all the reasons Mark mentioned.

    I'm sure a large part of this is personal preference based on the type of your paddling priorities and what you get used to.

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    If your looking for a good Kayak Paddle at a reasonable price... here is one I think you'll really like to go along with your new Tomcat.

    We offer the Carlisle Magic Plus Kayak Paddle

    Alaska Raft Connection spring specials running 'Through the end of May' would put this paddle in your hands at $100.

    Couple specs worth consideration about this paddle:
    1.) Fiberglass-filled, polypropylene blades in visible colors
    2.) Paddle is simple, lightweight & durable
    3.) Asym, spooned blade shape to reduce some flutter combined with a lightweight, sturdy, forgiving, warm in hand 'glass shaft'
    4.) Push-button breakdown & adjusts blade feathering 0° or 60° for right- or left-handed control
    5.) Ergonomic grip area for better paddle control and less fatigue + rubber drip rings help keep hands and lap dry.

    All this is a relatively inexpensive yet well constructed 2 pc. paddle so you can afford a spare for your longer trips.

    I have them in two colors --- blue 'cloud' & orange 'sunrise'
    220cm-230cm-240cm
    Nice and light-weight at 36 oz.

    *For what boaters tend to define as high-angle paddlers or people going to be seated forward position in an IK... yes, Mark and Jim are right, this favors the short as you want to go to a degree.

    On the other hand --- your boat width is a factor, so is your height. Additionally, the paddling you more or less described favors the 220cm for low-angle paddling while touring in a more relaxed position center of boat w/ good overall efficiency.

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    If you need an inflatable and still need some speed to keep up with a sea kayak, you should check this out- http://www.hobiecat.com/kayaking/models_i14t.html
    Contact me if you want to try mine out. It is amazing! Nothing like it. I live in Anchorage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flipperman View Post
    If you need an inflatable and still need some speed to keep up with a sea kayak, you should check this out- http://www.hobiecat.com/kayaking/models_i14t.html
    Contact me if you want to try mine out. It is amazing! Nothing like it. I live in Anchorage.
    Mirage drive is remarkably efficient...

  20. #20

    Default

    Recvd. Boat today was on back order very nice. Date of manufacture was 8-08 in China.
    But with REI,s Bulletproof warranty not to worried. Kurt

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