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Thread: sheep tent

  1. #1

    Default sheep tent

    Wanted to get an idea of some specific tents you guys have used or are still using on sheep hunts. Any experiences, reviews, etc. would be great. Have already done some research in backpacker, outside magazines gear reviews, but would like to hear from some sheep hunters. Thanks in advance...

  2. #2

    Default Sheep Tent

    I am very fond of my Stephenson's Warmlite. Lite, roomy and holds up to the worst Wx.

  3. #3

    Default NF Vector

    I used the North Face Vector 22 this year. Very lightweight, holds up to wind very well, and is well vented. Used it for a gear tent for a spring brown bear hunt and it withstood some wicked winds. It's a little small for two big people, and there is not much room under the vestibule, but I don't mind sacrificing that for light weight.

  4. #4

    Default tents

    We had good luck with a go lite tp tent/tarp this year. Very roomy and a little bit of draft, but if you stake down the edges well, it will keep you dry. It weighs like 2.5 lbs. Then take your bivy sacs (1-1.5 lbs) and if it gets nasty, you'll be fine. Plus you can take your bivy's with you for the day and survive a night near your dead sheep if you have to instead of returning to camp.

  5. #5
    New member mtcop71's Avatar
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    Default Mountain Hardwear

    I used the Mountain Hardwear Hammerhead II , this tent was great for 2 guys, 6'5" and 6'2", each had are own vestibule and absolutely no condensation. A little heavy on the sheep tent side of things at 7lb 6 oz, but well worth it for a little more space. tons of storage and a gear loft that was used alot for are socks to dry.

  6. #6
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default

    i've been impressed with the mt hardward pct 1, works great for one guy and held up for three years of guiding, i went out and bought another one, right at 3lbs i belive.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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  7. #7
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default

    Stephensen's - very light but too much condensation for Aug hunt
    Bibler I tent - light, tough, a bit crowded
    Bibler Eldorado - fairly light, great ventilation, sat room, weather proof
    Black Diamond 1st light - very light, a bit crowded
    Black Diamond Lighthouse - very light, sat room
    Marmot Taku - light, bit crowded
    Bibler megamid - light, lots of room, no floor, single pole
    Titanium goat - very light, no floor, single pole, side caves in with wind

    I have used a number of others most of which are no longer made.

    This year will most likely try Marmot 2-P without tent - just fly and foot print.

    Nothing is perfect - what ever works for you.....and is weather proof since sometimes you may spend literaly days waiting on the weather to cooperate.

  8. #8
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    Default

    I used a Marmot Twilight 2p,it worked great in the wind,2 vestibules,vents well and fairly cheap just over 200.00

  9. #9

    Default Stephenson's Revisited

    The double wall option reduces condensation and adds very little weight.

  10. #10
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Sheep Tents

    I prefer Wild Country / Terra Nova tents for sheep hunts. I think you have to balance the weight factor with durability. Also it depends on how early in the season you're hunting. Sheep season brackets summer and fall, so any weather is possible. But the first couple of weeks are usually pretty warm, so you might get by with just a tarp. But then there's a chance of more severe weather, and you're stuck out there...

    My strategy is to look at what the climbers use. Granted, they face harsher conditions, but our mountains are no less rugged. You've got to have something that can really take the wind in exposed conditions.

    I believe Terra Nova is no longer available directly in the United States, so you will have to order directly from the UK.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
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    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
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  11. #11
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    Default each to his own

    Some guys like the totally ultralite minimalist approach. Some guys go with a 3 season midweight tent, 5-7 lbs. Some guys are willing to carry a couple extra pounds to have a 4 season bombproof tent with a little more room for when you get weathered in and need to hole up for a day or two. I have friend who was literally blown off a mtn. in a 2 man, 3 season, 2 pole north face tent. Highwinds and snow in a blizzard flattened his tent and broke the 2 easton aluminum poles. He ended up tumbling down the mtn in a blizzard at night. Stormed for a day or so after that. He was on a solo trip. He ended up turning on his epirb, rolled up in his bag and tent like a mummy and was picked off the mtn when the weather broke. He describes it as a near death experience. I myself am willing to carry the extra weight and go with a 4 season 5-pole expedition tent. Depending on what you go with they weigh around 8-12 lbs. The Marmot and TNF 4 season 2 man tents with flys are about 10lbs. 3 mans like the TNF VE-25 (2guys and gear) are about 12. Bibler single wall 2 man are about 4-7. The Bombshelter is probably has the best room/weight ratio. Good sized tent at 9lbs. Personally I would probably buy a Bibler Fitzroy with vestible if I was going to buy a tent. I think they run about 7 with vestibule. 5-pole single wall bombproof tent.

    I personally like the high tech single wall tents. I have a 1996 model NorthFace single wall 4 season expedition tent that is 6x8 feet with a vestibule with 5 internal poles that weighs 10lbs total. It has vents and works great. It is awesome with two guys and packs and gear inside. We used in on a 50 mile 12 day walking sheep hunt last august. We had some high wind and rain but no snow. It was nice to know that we had a shelter that we could depend on if we got caught in a raging mtn blizzard 25 miles from the truck.

    You do have to manage condesation more with a single wall in certain situation. but I think the advantages outweigh any condensation issue. With a breeze condesation is not an issue at all. Plus, a single wall tent is very quiet in high wind. No flapping rain fly.

    Check out the Gear fourm if you haven't already.

  12. #12
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    Default TNF

    Good story about TNF tents snyd. I see it as the guy falling down the mountain and he still couldnt break one. Although he did break a couple of poles. I know a family member who had a brown bear try to cave in his North Face tent but it gave up. (likely due to the blood curdling screams of the occupant which damaged his eardrums but I like to think it was the tent.) The tent was left with only claw marks in the rainfly. I think they are the toughest tents. I would take any tent on a walk in hunt but take my toughest tent when I fly in cause if it gets bad your ride cant come get you.

  13. #13
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    Talking

    I like my Cabelas big horn II. A bit heavye at 70# for most people but I have four hunting partners that are close to 1700# apiece.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sollybug View Post
    Good story about TNF tents snyd. I see it as the guy falling down the mountain and he still couldnt break one. Although he did break a couple of poles.....
    Well, what I meant to point out here is that his 3 season tent almost cost him his life in this situation. The tent failed even though it is a quality tent. It was just out of it's element in high wind and snow, which can happen even in July in Alaska. Not to say that TNF tents are bad. I just wonder though, if he would have had a Mountain 25 (4 season expedition tent) it may have been a different story.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    I have friend who was literally blown off a mtn. in a 2 man, 3 season, 2 pole north face tent. Highwinds and snow in a blizzard flattened his tent and broke the 2 easton aluminum poles. He ended up tumbling down the mtn in a blizzard at night.
    I see your point about the value of a four season tent over a three season, however wanted to point out that this seems like more of a failure in setting the tent properly and knowing its limitations. I have a 2 man, 3 season, 3 pole North Face (the TadPole 23) that I really like. Although the mesh walls would be a little chilly in the cold winds you mentioned I feel condfident it would hold up quite well. Of course it would have to be set properly and if the snow was that heavy, it may require I get up and brush the snow off on occasion. Someone will probably say that is not possible to brush the snow if you're out hunting, but if the weather is that bad, I doubt I'd bee too far from my tent anyway.

    -Carnivore
    Everything that lives and moves will be food for you.
    Genesis 9:3

  16. #16
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Another thought on tents and sheep hunting

    I should mention that I use my tent in a variety of ways too. That's an important distinction; your style of hunting. For me I have used my tent as a primary base camp shelter, or on other hunts I'll take it with me hunting, so I can camp where the mood takes me.

    If I'm doing the base camp thing, I will camp out in the rocks with no tent for a night or two if necessary. Sleep during the day (because you're sure not gonna get much sleep at night without a tent or sleeping bag).

    Of course the problem with this is that you're not going to carry it all out in one trip. Even back in my younger days I could carry a whole sheep plus cape and horns in one load, but not the camp. My longest pack with that load was 6.5 miles up in the Hallet River area. Spent the night on the strip with no sleeping bag, then pulled my camp the next day. With the long days we get in August, I suppose you could keep working at it until you drop. Who needs sleep when it's still light outside?

    Anyway, I thought I should mention that. Sometimes I get locked into thinking that I HAVE to have a tent every night. It just ain't so.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  17. #17

    Default GoLite TeePee

    I second the motion on the GoLite Hex (whatever) TeePee tent. Two of us used it up in the Brooks this fall (late Aug/ early Sep) and were very pleased with it's performance. It's very light and quick to set up, plus it withstood some nasty weather. Make sure to bring your bivy though just in case you get caught up on the hill.

    My view of a tents functionality during sheep season is to keep rain and snow off you while sleeping, and to cover what little gear you may leave behind at camp. Anything else is a waste of onces.

  18. #18
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    Red face TNF

    If you cant tell I am really impressed with North Face tents (VE 25). Mine is 10 years old but so far has withstood jet engine winds on Mt wrangell and 2+ feet of snow on a glacier. A family members withstood a brown bear and TNF replaced the fly for free and sewed up the side. So far not a drop of water inside. Its racking up quite a record. The jet engine winds were partly my stupidity for tenting on an exposed ridgeline rather than down out of the wind. If we hadnt placed boulders inside of our tent and wrapped climbing rope around it we might have flown off the ridge also. Lesson for myself: Look for protection from wind and rain and not a good view when setting up your tent.

  19. #19
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default

    Very good point. Good equipment is important...but common sense, and critical evaluation of the total situation is paramont. For example don't pitch your tent in the middle of a bear trail. My example is a bit far fetched
    (esp. since Treadwell is no more) but the point is to carefully evaluate where you pitch your tent for all possible adverse aspects that may impact you. This is especially important in the mountains...and always secure ALL of your tie downs (in my opinon the more you have the better) regardless of what the CURRENT weather is like - it's gonna change, or you're not sheep huntin'.

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