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Thread: Fannin Sheep in Alaska

  1. #1
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    Default Fannin Sheep in Alaska

    I'm looking for some information on Fannin Sheep hunting in Alaska. Any ideas?
    JIM

  2. #2
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    If you're looking for information on where to hunt, I'd start with a local biologist. I'm sure they could atleast point you in the right direction.

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Question

    Jim, I don't think we have fannins in AK.
    Western Yukon and maybe down into extreme northern edge of BC might be the extent of their range.
    It almost seems that they (stone sheep/fannin) should be in the southern most area of the wrangels, but I doubt they are. That would put them in the park anyway.

    If you find something out let us know, great question.


    Frank

  4. #4

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    Only two small bands of them in Alaska that I was ever aware of. One on the White River and another on the Nation River. Rams get killed as soon as they become legal, by a select group. Never seen a trophy come from them though. BC is your best bet for a trophy one.

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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Don't let Frank fool you, Jim. If you find something out, keep it to yourself. Otherwise you'll be competing with all these alaskan sheep hunters :-)
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    BC does not recognize Fannins as a seperate sub-species. They are considered Stone's sheep that are very light in colour and the best area to look here would be Atlin anywhere east of Bennett Lake. The area to the west of the lake contains Dall's and it borders the Wrangels I believe. It's not a cheap hunt but that is where to find them.
    It's the journey, not the destination.

  7. #7

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    Similar deal in Alaska, only most consider them Dall Sheep. Just the opposite. They are carefully watched, highly prized by a few hunters. A number of Dall rams have been taken, because they were covered in Shale Oil. The way I understand it, the hunters did not ever learn the truth.

  8. #8

    Smile Fannins

    Here's a fannin I got in the TMA this year
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    wow i'd have shot that sheep too, markings are what makes a fannin like that one so unique! congrats!
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fullcurl View Post
    Here's a fannin I got in the TMA this year

    Not sure if BRWNBR is tracking, but I'm gonna call your bluff. Photoshop??

  11. #11
    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    Nope, that's one of those rare tma saddle sheep. lol!

  12. #12
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Talking ha!

    Stephen, You can't fool all of us around here.
    Photoshop my foot! We know a dalmation when we see one...

    Now why does it have those wierd curly things on its head?

  13. #13

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    Good Job, on the photo. Not sure though if you are covering up the gut shot or giving up the Fannin Honey Hole to the masses. So much for those desiring a permit to that very special, secret spot.

  14. #14
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    fullcurl has a book out "Fannin for Dummies" i think dave might have it in the library here....
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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  15. #15

    Default Red and brown streaking?

    Okay, I want to know if the red and light brown streaks qualify it as a “Fannin” ? Or does it need the black saddle also to qualify? If the red and light brown streaks qualify, then I have harvested a couple of Fannin rams and never even knew it....

    FullCurl: Please give me some clarification here, I am dying to know.......

    Bigmnt

  16. #16

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    Here's a dall I shot back in 2005. I think by Ovis' standards this could actually be considered a Fanin. I shot it in the AK range so its a Dall, but it did have a big patch of black hair on its back. I know in the picture it looks like dirt, but they are actually black hairs. I took this picture because I thought the black hairs were a bit odd on a Dall.


  17. #17

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    Here I found another picture that shows it and yes I did shoot him in the horn....


  18. #18

    Default Infamous TMA Fannon

    Sorry guys, wasn't even trying to fool anyone. Just scribled in some black. Not even as fancy as photoshop. Just being silly.

  19. #19
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Wink looks like a bighorn in the woodpile

    Learn about our Fannin's Sheep

    Fannin's sheep
    Faro’s sheep: fascinating animals in a mountainous splendour

    Every fall sheep gather in the mountains and cliff sides around Faro to spend the winter. The winds that blow over the PellyMountains help to keep the mountain sides clear of snow, and the south facing slopes gather warmth from the sun. The cliff sides are not only a good place to forage on the grasses that remain from the summer, they also provide a secure home for the sheep. Sheep must be wary of the wolves, coyotes, wolverines, lynx and bears that frequent the Faro area. If any of these predators come looking for a meal the sheep have only one weapon to fight back with: their hooves! Sheep hooves are well adapted for climbing and gripping on rocky slopes, and once in this terrain the predators look clumsy in comparison. But there is a catch, the best food is usually away from the cliffs, so sheep venture daily out from the steepest cliffs in search of food, but always keeping an eye open for anyone that might have them for a meal.
    In 426 and PolyG, two of the top ranked rams in Faro in 2004winter there are about 80-90 sheep right close to Faro. The distinctive colour of each individual means that it’s possible to get to know each and every one of them personally. And they certainly do have personalities, from the adventurous youngsters who spend time practising their climbing skills in some of the most unlikely places, to the wizened caution of an old ewe, the sheep are a real pleasure to watch. Some of the most exciting moments are during the November-December pre rut and rut, when massive horned rams can be seen battling it out over ewes, and later discerning ewes can be spotted as they either choose to mate or ’run for the hills’ from rams that they would rather avoid.
    Come spring tiny grey-white lambs dot the mountain sides. They dodge and dart and play with one another as their mothers, tired and exhausted from the winter, look on. The mothers must have good eyes for danger since a circling golden eagle can make a quick meal of a lamb. Often you’ll see a mother craning her neck skywards, with her little one nestled beside her as an eagle soars overhead. The moment when a diving eagle is fended off by the horns of a mother is one you will never forget! Once the lambs are large enough they head off into the higher mountains to spend their summers in the rich grassy meadows. A hike into the Mt. Mye area in summer can be rewarded by a glimpse into the lives of sheep in their breathtakingly beautiful summer home.
    Fannin’s sheep and the mystery of sheep coat colour
    Fannin’s sheep were named after John Fannin, the first curator of the Royal British Columbia Museum. The name was given to these sheep after a ram specimen was taken in which the neck and face were white but the trunk or ’saddle’ was dark. However, it was later noticed that individuals within any population vary greatly in their colour. Some have darker Fannin's sheep with Tintina Trench in backgroundnecks and very dark trunk areas, while others are very light. It was thought that for this reason colour is not a good way to distinguish differences in the sheep.
    Recently, we’ve found out that hybridization with bighorn sheep is the likely reason for the dark colour found in Stone’s and Fannin’s sheep. When an all white Dall’s sheep and a bighorn sheep bred at the Yukon game farm, the lamb turned out to look a lot like a Fannin’s sheep! We’ve also found genetic evidence to back this up that shows that Stone’s sheep in British Columbia interbred with bighorn sheep before the last ice age.
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  20. #20
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    WHAT??!! fullcurl, you scribbled in that black on your sheep! no. i won't belive it. i can't belive it. no uhh uhh no. next year i'm putting in for TMA fannin tags your not talking me outa it this time....scribbled it in...geessshh who's gonna buy that load....
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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