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Thread: Kasilof protection update, Meeting set!!!

  1. #1
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Default Kasilof protection update, Meeting set!!!

    There will be a public meeting on April 8th, at 6:30 PM, scheduled to be held at the Tustumena School. The Kasilof historical society will be presenting three different scenario's for protection of the grasses, at the mouth of the Kasilof.

    There was some monies granted to the borough, roughly $60,000, for permanent fencing. The Kasilof historical society has helped to take the lead on this. Mr. Brent Johnson has taken the bull by the horns and I thank him for that.
    We need public input on what we want to do this year, in way of protecting habitat.

    This is not nearly enough funds to protect both the Northern and southern beaches but it is a start. Please come and take a look and give us your opinions.
    JOET and to the rest of you guys that live down that way and also wanted to help, we need you to come and take a look and voice your opinions.
    I will be hung up at the Great Alaskan Sportsmen show so I cannot be there to meet and greet. Hopefully we will have a large turn-out!!
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

  2. #2
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Default

    Unfortunately, I'll be at "spring training" at the Birchwood range for the entire week and won't be able to attend.

    I heard news reports a couple weeks ago about the grant money to build permanent fencing and they were talking about impact studies and land use permits. That kind of government BS will chew up the $60,000 before they can even buy a fence post. And it could take a couple years to work through the red tape. What is needed is an environmental lawyer to jump on board and work pro bono to get all that crap taken care of. As much as I dislike the group for their senseless attacks on the oil industry, perhaps a call to Cook Inletkeeper might get them on board to assist with the legal side. After all, they would be the one to oppose any kind of "construction" on the beaches of the Cook Inlet. Invite them in at the get-go so they don't have a reason to oppose any permanent construction.

    As I doubt that permanent fencing will go up this year, I still think that a truckload of orange plastic snow fence, "U" posts, bailing wire and a dozen volunteers with some hand held fence post drivers are a worthy consideration. Set up this temp fencing at the beginning of June and take it down at the end of August. Focus only on the areas adjacent to the river mouth. Perhaps a quarter mile worth on each side. I bet it could be setup in just a few hours of labor.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  3. #3
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Default Sure wish we could

    DNR wants bonding and insurance prior to any work being done. Access and public input must also be taken into account. That is a 90 day period, I believe. If we are going to do it, I guess we should do it right, right off the get-go.
    We are looking at volunteers and paid contractor's to get this off the ground. It will make the $60,000 go a little further. Even with temporary fencing, there are requirements for bonding and insurance also.Government red tape but we are bullying our way through.
    We do have Cookinletkeepers on board.They helped draft our original letter to the Governor. We also have people in Juneau trying to get more funding out of the legislature.
    I'm sorry to say this might not be completed this year but we will get as much as possible done.
    With a 90 day period for public input, that puts us into July for starting the fencing, permanent or temporary. So we are looking at August to start constructing whatever is decided. Too much traffic and activity to attempt in July.
    It sucks but that is the best we can do, unless we get some night riders to throw something up in the middle of the night. Any other suggestions? I'm all ears.
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    Member hooternanny's Avatar
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    Default wise words

    joats suggestion about getting them involved from the get is wise. very wise

    posting on april 3rd for an april 8th meeting likely won't produce much turn out-

    the problem is really because when your dipping on that side and you have to pee,

    orange temp fence is good idea, but i say bring in some crappers (like on the other side. then post a sign for stay out of the bushes, then law enforcement and a few tickets for people who refuse to fallow the rules will spread by word of mouth real quick.

    send me the 50,000 left over. no wait keep it and don't ask for any next time-

  5. #5
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Default For those crapper's....

    We are waiting to see what the state does in relation to that.
    We asked the Governor to get his agencies on board and in a row, and... we are still waiting on a reply and action. We brought up the fact that we need them on both sides, and that includes dumpster service. Past funding has been skeletal at best.We are not done yet!!!
    If anyone wants to read the letter, go to www.alaskadipnetting.com. and scroll down. It should be posted on the front page with other stuff too. We are pushing this through fast due to time constraints and to get something going this year. Can't say we are not trying.
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    Thumbs up The Governor's Office responded this morning

    Quote Originally Posted by thewhop2000 View Post
    We are waiting to see what the state does in relation to that.
    Cora Campbell from the Governor's office did respond this morning; here it is:

    http://42.com/SCADA/4.2010_2RuffnerFromCoraCampbell.pdf

  7. #7
    Member hooternanny's Avatar
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    Thumbs up meeting tonight!

    from today's local paper.

    http://www.peninsulaclarion.com/stor...03567795.shtml

    and from the article f.m. posted, it seems the crappers and trash can's will happen.

    great self managment work going on here.

    it's nice for me to learn of who and how these things get done

  8. #8

    Default

    Have any of you people ever been out there when dip-netting is at its peak? Ever been to Jim Creek? I think its the same crowd.

    Any fence might last an hour before some Half-drunk turd runs it over with a lifted F-250.

  9. #9

    Default Kasilof Meeting

    I was at the meeting on Thursday evening. There was a general consensus that something needed to be done to better manage the intensive use that occurs at the mouth of the Kasilof. There were 50-60 people present, 5 or 6 said do nothing or had vastly different ideas that involved unlikely BOF action. Informal straw polls were taken a couple times. The majority of those attending favored a fence that keeps access and wheeled traffic on the beach where grass doesn’t grow. This would be very similar to the approach the City of Kenai has used.

    It was pretty clear that the Historical Society had no desire to prevent access to the fishery, and most people agreed that there were no access advantages to having multiple trails that weave across the dunes and wetlands leading to the same place. Traveling the beach just like at Kenai, Clam Gulch, Whiskey Gulch, Ninilchik, etc would provide reliable access without damaging habitat.

    Most of the user groups had a representative or two present. There are still some permit hurdles to overcome and like AKCCC points out, a fence in and of itself won’t solve the problems – I think the analogy to Jim Creek is pretty spot on. Permits to build a fence on DNR lands requires a full public process, including a call for public comments. How to keep yahoos from tearing up nearly a mile of fence is another challenge to be tackled.

  10. #10
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default That's easy...

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos View Post
    ... How to keep yahoos from tearing up nearly a mile of fence is another challenge to be tackled.
    ... make it electric!

    Seriously, however, I would like to see them keep one dedicated access route above tideline for access on the south beach. It can be squirrelly navigating the gravel in places- moreso than at Ninilchik or Anchor Point

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    Default me too

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaos View Post
    I was at the meeting on Thursday evening. There was a general consensus that something needed to be done to better manage the intensive use that occurs at the mouth of the Kasilof. There were 50-60 people present, 5 or 6 said do nothing or had vastly different ideas that involved unlikely BOF action. Informal straw polls were taken a couple times. The majority of those attending favored a fence that keeps access and wheeled traffic on the beach where grass doesn’t grow. This would be very similar to the approach the City of Kenai has used.

    It was pretty clear that the Historical Society had no desire to prevent access to the fishery, and most people agreed that there were no access advantages to having multiple trails that weave across the dunes and wetlands leading to the same place. Traveling the beach just like at Kenai, Clam Gulch, Whiskey Gulch, Ninilchik, etc would provide reliable access without damaging habitat.

    Most of the user groups had a representative or two present. There are still some permit hurdles to overcome and like AKCCC points out, a fence in and of itself won’t solve the problems – I think the analogy to Jim Creek is pretty spot on. Permits to build a fence on DNR lands requires a full public process, including a call for public comments. How to keep yahoos from tearing up nearly a mile of fence is another challenge to be tackled.
    At great personal risk of quoting your entire post and yet just offering a "me too" message, that's exactly what I'm saying.

    Very well put, and also it sounds like some good reasoning is working in a very public political issue - great to see. Thanks.

  12. #12
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Default Meeting report for the Kasilof

    This is a report on the 4-8-10 meeting. The bottom line is: the Nikiski students, Dylan Holloway and Melinda Hampton will try to put up temporary fencing for this season. It will go similar to option 2. The folks attending this meeting picked option 3 for permanent fencing. They also recommended seeking a Special Use Area designation from DNR. Much of the meeting was video recorded and cassette recorded, but I haven't taken time to watch or hear those yet.


    Brent


    Kasilof Regional Historical Association Dunes meeting 4-8-10 Meeting Report




    Meeting was called to order at 6:35 p.m. In attendance were Robert Ruffner (Kenai Watershed Forum), Cathrine Cassidy (Kasilof Regional Historical Assn [KRHA]), Dave Letzring (KRHA), Brent Johnson (KRHA) Tom Daulton (KRHA), Mike Wiley (KRHA), Joan Lahndt (KRHA), Al Hershberger (KRHA), Robert Begich (F&G Sport Fish), Ginny Litchfield (F&G Habitat), Ellen Simpson (State of Ak F&G, Anchorage), Pat Shields (F&G Com Fish who participates in pu gillnet fishery), Adam Smith (DNR, Anchorage), Rick Thompson (DNR, Anchorage), Phil Morin (Nikiski High science teacher), Dylan Holloway (Nikiski student / Caring for the Kenai), Melinda Hampton (Nikiski student / Caring for the Kenai), Dr. Alan Boraas (KP College Anthropology Department), Dr. Roland Maw (United Cook Inlet Drift Association executive director who lives in Cohoe), Robert Williams (Kenai Peninsula Fisherman’s Association president who lives in Cohoe), Paul Shadura (KPFA executive director), Sammy Crawford (KPB School Board member). Total attendance was a little over 60 people.


    Catherine Cassidy operated the computer/projector and displayed maps and pictures on the wall.


    Brent Johnson served as moderator and opened the meeting by asking F&G Habitat to explain what was important about the Kasilof Dune grasslands that they should be protected? Robert Begich gave a very brief explanation.
    Robert Ruffner offered to expand a little. He went to the front of the room and detailed how the flats behind the dunes provided nutrient exchanges with the nearby estuary and this process was important for fish habitat. Robert said the dunes were protected from erosion by a grass covering. Should the grass become denuded, wind and water could erode the dunes, allowing the beach line to retreat. He also said the grasslands and marsh behind were important to migratory birds.
    Brent noted that the grass looked different in this area. Robert said it was. And somewhat unique. The area is perhaps 640 acres. Only the Kenai River and Chickaloon Flats offered as much of this particular type of grass. Ninilchik and Deep Creek had some, but in much smaller areas.
    Alan Boraas spoke about the geology involved in forming the features we are referring to as “dunes,” speculating that the area may have been formed by geological processes related to relative changes in sea-level. The area should be studied by a geologist, but if it is destroyed beforehand, we will never know how it was formed. Alan said one of the unauthorized trails goes right through a depression that has archeological significance. There are indications of several early history remnants in this area.
    George Pierce, a personal use gillnetter, said he didn’t want any fence put up. He wanted the pu gillnetting area expanded so that it spread out and didn’t impact this area. He said the season only lasted 9 days, so no long-term fence is justified.
    Steve Webb, who lives in Cohoe, said he has had bad luck with fencing. He suggested putting a proposal before the Board of Fish, asking them to move the dipnet fishery away from this area and unto the beach south of Cohoe Road.
    Paul Shadura supported option 2. He believed this gave users a viable method of ingress.
    Other people spoke and said any fence could be vandalized. It would be best to build option 2 and thus satisfy the desire for access across the dunes, then to have disgruntled individuals tear down the fence and drive wherever they want.
    Phil Morin supported Option 2. He is a member of the Harbor Commission for Kenai, which has given him a lot of insight and he has been involved in the Kenai dune protection project. He thought that providing access across the back of the dunes would satisfy those who want to drive to the river, but don’t want to drive on the beach. Phil also said that he has walked on the dunes. In the area away from the beach people have left excrement in heaped abundance.
    A gentleman spoke and said a lot of disabled people use the area to dipnet. They shouldn’t have to go all the way back to Cohoe Road to use toilets.
    Many people agreed with statements made that the beach provides adequate access to all pu fishing areas. Erik Huebsch, a fifty-year resident of Kasilof, pointed out that driving on the beach is possible almost all the time regardless of the stage of the tide. Only the most extreme high tides might block vehicles and then only for a couple hours at the top of the tide.
    Leif Jacobsen of Cohoe had pictures on CD. One was taken in 2003 and others were current. One of these pictures was projected on the wall during the hearing. On that picture the “dunes” and the lower marshy area behind them were clearly visible. Also clearly visible were fresh tracks which had destroyed some grass on the south side of Cohoe Road.
    Ginny Litchfield asked if Option 3 would displace fishers and put them on the north side of the river, creating even more problems over there?
    Brent replied that the plan was to build a fence next year for protecting the north side of the River.
    Someone asked if Dylan & Melinda are trying to put up temporary fencing this year?
    They came to the front and explained their project. The have access to 2000 feet of temporary fencing material left over from the Kenai project. They have metal posts. They have volunteers lined up to erect the fence. They intend to install it in accordance with the Option 2 design. [Option 2 will require about 10,000 feet of fencing.]
    The crowd gave the students an applause as well as encouragement.
    The students have come upon a difficulty in getting their permits from DNR. The process is designed to be thorough and will take at least 30 days.
    Richard Thompson suggested that the student’s temporary fencing project and the KRHA permanent fencing project be joined in application. This would streamline the application process. Those in attendance readily agreed that this was a good idea.
    Phil Morin said the City of Kenai had received certain Baptist Missionaries. They work in the Kenai dune area at no charge and offer trash clean up, remind people to stay off the grass, and even do free child care. Phil believes this same organization would like to work at the Kasilof dunes.
    Brent was enthused by the idea and asked if anyone opposed it?
    A lady spoke against it. She said that this was our responsibility and the people who live here need to police the area.
    After allowing others a chance to speak against the issue, Brent asked how many supported it. Most hands went up so counting was difficult. Brent asked instead how many opposed. 5 votes were cast against asking the missionaries to come.
    Cheryle Karnikis spoke against building a fence. She believed good signs would solve the problem. She spoke about interpretive signs that would explain the function of the grasslands and outline impacts of denuding the dunes. After Cheryle presented her sign ideas Brent asked the crowd if any others thought that the problem could be solved with signs alone. No one indicated such belief.
    Pat Shields told how he was involved in erecting the previous signs. “Before the cement was dry 4-wheelers whizzed past the signs and across the dunes,” he said. He also questioned the logic of option 2. “If protecting the dunes was the primary objective of fencing, why erect fences that direct vehicular traffic on to the dunes? This is the very place where we currently have signs saying ‘Keep Off the Dunes.’ It seems this option would support and authorize vehicular traffic on the dunes.”
    Many people complained about the way ATV users drive around the dunes and flats like it is a motor-cross course and raised the question of why the state allows that to happen on fragile habitat.
    Richard Thompson and Adam Smith came to the front of the room and Richard said there were other options. He explained why no enforcement existed to keep people off the grass. He said that was because no law existed to keep people off the grass. However, a Special Use Area could be created there. Such a declaration would require an extensive permitting process and public hearings. Once declared, a Special Use Area would give the State authority to write tickets to violators who drive on the grass.
    Discussion on a Special Use Area followed. Nate Corr uses the Kenai flats for duck hunting. He said DNR Parks Division people were always tearing down duck blinds there and he felt like the same activity would happen at Kasilof if it got a government designation. Several people agreed. They didn’t want any more intrusion by the government.
    Richard Thompson got a chance to respond. He said the Special Use Area can be set up however the public wants it. There will be public hearings on it and then it will be formed according to what people want.
    Brent asked for a show of hands for those who favored forming a Special Use area. Some 25 people raise their hand. When asked how many opposed the Special Use Area, only about 5 people voted.
    Adam Smith has been in charge of awarding contracts for porta potties. They are set up just on the south [west] side of Cohoe Road because no 4-wd vehicles are available to service these toilets.
    Richard Thompson said DNR has received funding for porta potties and trash collection for 2010.
    Ginny Litchfield has had the opportunity to watch a lot of people engaged in salmon fishing. This activity seems to make normally sane people eccentric. These people will do whatever they need to do to get to the salmon.
    A question arose about whether this Special Use Area would be a fee area?
    Brent said that he believed in user fees. The people using the area should pay for the services required to administer it.
    George Pierce took strong objection to that. He said, “Why should we have to pay for all the problems caused by people from other places?”
    Someone asked if the soft sand along the beach was a realistic place to drive? Would people get stuck a lot?
    Brent answered that 4wd vehicles should have no problem on the beach here. Further south there is blue clay which can stick 4wd & 6wd rigs. Here, loose sand can give problems for 2wd, but 4wd should be fine. Leif Jacobsen said the upper 50 feet of beach gets dried out pretty bad sometimes, but it wasn’t a significant problem.
    Mark Ducker pointed out that getting stuck on the beach was not likely if people drove single-file on the upper beach. A track of twin ruts soon form that is very solid and easy to drive in. Mark often drives there and doesn’t even bother putting his truck in 4wd.
    [While it wasn’t noted at the meeting, vehicles using the trails across the dunes are also susceptible to getting stuck. In heavy rain the trails can get slimy. 2wd vehicles frequently get stuck there.]
    Nate Corr said Option 3 made the best sense. He felt like it would be the most likely to succeed and to accomplish the objective. He offered to help build the fence.
    A disagreement arose about whether or not PU gillnets operated off the beach. Brent said they were not in the area, but fished to the west / south.
    [Brent was mistaken, the pu gillnets operate all the way to a marker at the end of the river. It is the dipnet fishery that doesn’t use the beach. Following is a brief description of the pu gillnet area and pu dipnet area:
    From June 15 through June 24 the PU gillnet fishery is open from 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. daily. The area open to fishing is approximately one mile south and one mile north of the mouth of the Kasilof River. Markers are placed near the terminus of the river, prohibiting the gillnet fishery from operating in the river mouth. The gillnet fishery is also allowed out to one mile from mean high water.
    The Kasilof River PU dip net fishery operates 24 hours a day from June 25 through August 7. The boundary of this fishery is the same as the gillnet fishery, albeit the dip net fishery is allowed in the mouth of the river up to a marker approximately 1 mile up the Kasilof. F&G often liberalizes this area to allow dip netting all the way up to the highway bridge. This is done when the escapement goal is in jeopardy of being exceeded. In an attempt to prevent gear conflict, however, F&G has been limiting the seaward boundary of the dipnet fishery to the same near-river markers of the gillnet fishery. In other words, the two areas don’t overlap. This is done to prevent conflicts if the commercial fishery “Terminal Harvest area” gets opened.]
    In the end, Option Zero (Don’t build any fence) attracted 7 votes.
    Option 1 (a single fence some 50 feet back from the beach edge of the grass) didn’t get any votes.
    Option 2 (fencing both sides of the trail nearest the marshy area, and looping the ocean side fence back along the beach edge of the grass; turning upriver with the landward side fence and following upriver to the first significant slough). This option will be the location of the temporary fence and it got 4 votes.
    Option 3 (a single fence that follows the beach edge of the grass from the guard rail to the River, and then turns upriver to the first significant slough. It also will extend along the north [east] side of Cohoe Rd. from the guard rail to the hill.) This option won 35 votes.
    Brent thanked Richard Thompson, Adam Smith and Ellen Simpson for coming from Anchorage. Brent said it was KRHA’s intent to turn in joint applications with Dylon and Melinda. They will try to get temporary fencing up this summer. KRHA will pursue the permits for option 3. They will also work toward getting this area declared a Special Use Area. And they will extend a welcome to the missionaries.

    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

  13. #13
    Member hooternanny's Avatar
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    Thumbs up OMG!

    you had me at....

    Quote Originally Posted by thewhop2000;Phil also said that he has walked on the dunes. In the area away from the beach people have left excrement in heaped abundance.
    A gentleman spoke and said a lot of disabled people use the area to dipnet. [B
    They shouldn’t have to go all the way back to Cohoe Road to use toilets.[/B]
    Many people agreed with statements made that the beach provides adequate access to all pu fishing areas. Erik Huebsch, a fifty-year resident of Kasilof, pointed out that driving on the beach is possible almost all the time regardless of the stage of the tide. Only the most extreme high tides might block vehicles and then only for a couple hours at the top of the tide.
    looks like they're gonna do it, and do it right.

    looks like i'll no longer have an excuse (to do my little trick).... to warm my waders.

    .......thanks WHOP

  14. #14
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    For those who claim that a fence won't last because of the few bad apples, I have to ask if you've ever been to Kasilof? There are a couple fences already there. They've been there for many years. No one messes with them. Stop being so pessimistic and let's move forward with this thing.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    For those who claim that a fence won't last because of the few bad apples, I have to ask if you've ever been to Kasilof? There are a couple fences already there. They've been there for many years. No one messes with them. Stop being so pessimistic and let's move forward with this thing.
    Put em across the trails, and then wait and see what happens in July when half of Los Anchorage comes to visit. Not pessimistic, REALISTIC.

  16. #16

    Default other ideas

    Quote Originally Posted by AKKCChief View Post
    Put em across the trails, and then wait and see what happens in July when half of Los Anchorage comes to visit. Not pessimistic, REALISTIC.
    All ears. If you've got any other ideas, many of us would be interested in hearing them.

  17. #17

    Default

    You have to control access well before the beach. A State Park or a SRA, with a manned fee station at the entrance. Willow Creek or the Little Su would be good models. Anything short will just cause you frustration, and wasted $$$$.

  18. #18

    Default parks or MLW planning?

    Quote Originally Posted by AKKCChief View Post
    You have to control access well before the beach. A State Park or a SRA, with a manned fee station at the entrance. Willow Creek or the Little Su would be good models. Anything short will just cause you frustration, and wasted $$$$.
    My impression is that those living closest to the scene are less than enamored by State Parks Management. Given what I've seen, I'd probably be for it - although I wouldn't like it. I'm probably 10 miles from the beach. I certainly didn't like it when Kenai started charging me to "park" on the beach. Have had to come to accept it.

    There did seem to be local support for DNR to develop a management plan for the land. Anyone have experience with Mine Land and Water developing management plans? I thought I heard them say that had been done for Jim Creek?

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    Member HKYDDY's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKKCChief View Post
    You have to control access well before the beach. A State Park or a SRA, with a manned fee station at the entrance. Willow Creek or the Little Su would be good models. Anything short will just cause you frustration, and wasted $$$$.
    Great, so we would have to pay a fee for no services then.

  20. #20
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    Default Update, New Meeting set Monday, May 17

    Please see the enclosed e-mail from Brent Johnson, concerning the next scheduled meeting, which is tonight. I will not be able to attend but others will. Anyone going, I would ask them to post their opinion on here. Please scroll below and you will see some minor changes in the works.
    On another note, Brenda Crim and her Baptist missionaries will be helping out this summer, concerning the Fence and trash. She is expecting 84 volunteers the first weekend and 170 people to help out on the second week of dipnetting. They have been doing this on the North side of the Kenai with a hospitality tent, giving away hotdogs, picking up trash, etc. Now they have promised to patrol the temporary fencing, at the Kasilof. ALL I CAN SAY IS, WOW!!!.
    This thing is starting to GROW!!!!

    Concerned people,


    I've received a request from DNR personnel to amend our application. I have done so and copies of maps and this amended description will be given to DNR officials at the Tustumena School meeting scheduled for Monday, May 17. I wanted to get this Amended description to as many people as possible before that meeting. Since neither Phil Morin nor I can attend that meeting, this e-mail will help me describe our plans.


    Changes of note include the estimation of 5,500 feet of fencing, compared to the earlier estimation of 4,500 feet. The earlier estimate was obtained from my odometer and a drive along the beach. The new distance comes from scaling on a map. My experience leans accuracy toward scaling. If anything, I expect the undulating contours of the MHW and vegetation line to add distance greater than 5,500 feet to the permanent fence project.


    A wider presentation of material is given, as well as a more complete description of post options.


    This description accepts responsibility for maintenance of the permanent fence, presents the efforts of the temporary fence, and mentions volunteers working in conjunction with Brenda Crim of Alaska Missions. The Nikiski High School students are also working on the application and will soon turn in a detailed application for the temporary fence.


    Thank you for your interest,


    Brent Johnson
    Kasilof Regional Historical association
    president




    Amended (5-14-2010) Project Description:

    Construct a fence to direct wheeled vehicles away from fragile grasslands on the Cohoe side (west side) of the Kasilof River mouth. The fence will consist of posts buried to a depth of about 41/2 feet. The posts will support two runs of 3/8 inch galvanized chain. The lower chain will be about 24 inches high and the upper chain about 40 inches high.
    Rocks with average diameters of between 3 and 6 feet will be used as available, and probably mostly at the Cohoe Road end of the fence. Concrete posts, and schedule 80 or greater steel pipe posts are also being considered. Concrete posts are environmentally friendly and can be cast with a “foot” to make them difficult to steal. They are also too heavy for most people to carry. Steel pipe may be driven in and thus is fast to install and installation don’t disturb vegetation.

    The fence will begin on the east side of the Cohoe Road right of way. An existing guard rail will be the point of beginning. A gate for emergency use is planned for this point. The fence will run about 25 feet back from the Mean High Water of Cook Inlet, on the edge of the grass covered uplands. This is the line above the most extreme high tides and thus marked by vegetation. The fence will be on Department of Natural Resources property (known as Kenai Peninsula Borough parcel 13302226) other wise described as Government Lots 1 through 3 and 5 through 7 of Section 2, Township 3 North, Range 12 West of the Seward Meridian (containing 225.35 acres plus or minus); and on Department of Natural Resources property known as Kenai Peninsula Borough parcel 13110003 and further described as Government Lot 1 of Section 35, Township 4 North, Range 12 West, Seward Meridian (containing 18.07 acres plus or minus).

    As the fence follows about 25 feet back from mean high water and runs easterly (toward the Kasilof River) it will reach a point 25 feet back from the Kasilof River mean high water. From there the fence will continue bending to the north as it follows this setback from mean high water, upriver. Upon reaching a prominent slough the fence will end. At the end of the fence will be 2 posts set about 4 feet apart and cross braced together to give stability to the chain and prevent the end post from leaning toward the other posts. Estimated length of the fence is about 5,500 feet.

    The logic of putting the fence about 25 feet back from the mean high water and on the edge of the grass is to avoid storm waves, logs and ice, which could damage the fence. This location will also maximize the area usable to the public.

    Construction equipment includes a Case 580 four wheel drive backhoe loader, a Case 480 four wheel drive backhoe loader, a Bobcat with an auger, a Kobelco LK 600 3 yard bucket loader with quick connect boom and forks, a Drott 40 Cruz-air 4 wheel drive excavator, and Drott 50 track excavator. The larger equipment would only be used for moving rocks or lifting things. It is unlikely that either Drott will be used. Numerous 3/4 ton and 1 ton 4 wheel drive pick ups will also be used. A 6 wheel drive dump truck is available. A White Wester Star semi tractor with a tilt top lowboy will be used to deliver and pick up equipment. A Lister 8 KW generator and a Lincoln wirefeed welder and a stick welder will be used.

    No equipment or fuel will be stored on site. Fence posts, chain, and equipment will only be staged on-site during daytime hours.

    The object of the fence is to direct wheeled traffic onto the beach and away from grass. Cohoe and Kasilof area residents, as well as several biologists, and the following organizations: Cook Inletkeeper, Kenai Area Fisherman’s Coalition, Kenai Peninsula Fisherman’s Association, Kenai River Professional Guides Association, Kenai/ Soldotna Fish and Game Advisory Committee, Kenai Watershed Forum are concerned denuding of the grassland will cause erosion, which will result in significant loss of Department of Natural Resources property, loss of habitat for certain migratory birds, and loss of important wetlands behind the grassland. These wetlands are connected to the Kasilof River and are important for salmon as well as waterfowl.

    Maintenance, bonding and fees will be provided by Kasilof Regional Historical Association until such a time that another Cohoe-Kasilof Community group forms to oversee the fence and grasslands.

    Construction of a temporary fence lane is planned across the grassland for the summer of 2010. The object of this fence is to hold vehicles to a single trail across the grasslands. It will be installed by Dillon Holloway and Melissa Hampton, Nikiski High School students and volunteers working with them. They will remove the fence after the 2010 dipnet season.

    Brenda Crim and a large group of Baptist missionaries provided general help keeping the temporary fence in repair at Kenai in 2009. They plan to offer the same service at the Kasilof River dunes in 2010.




    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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