Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Scope slipping in rings

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default Scope slipping in rings

    This is one of those subjects that never seems to go away as the problem never seems to get solved for everyone.

    Anyway - that is the latest solution(s) for scope slippage in a heavy recoiling gun? I'm looking to mount a new scope on my Win 70 .375 H&H with Talley QD rings and want the scope to stay in place. The old 1.5- 4x scope shifted so the heavier scope could be an issue. Perhaps I didn't have the Talley rings tightened down sufficently?

    If I get around to scoping it the .378 Weatherby could be an even bigger problem.

    Lots of good experience on this forum so any help will be appeciated.

    THANKS!
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Any good quality rubber cement or some rosin. I perfer the rubber cement as it will peel off when you want it to and never had any issues with it holding scopes, even on a Lott.
    Tennessee

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Bethel, Cantwell, Fort Yukon, Skagway, Chevak and Point Hope
    Posts
    967

    Default

    They make the little strips that you can use for inserting in your rings to help hold the scope from slipping. I believe that Ruger supplies them with each rifle purchased.

    You could always try a couple strips of velcro type strips also.

  4. #4
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,382

    Default

    Primarily the issue with scopes slipping in the rings tends to be alignment, if the ring is not "square" with the tube of the scope, then just the edges of the ring are bearing against the tube. Make sure that the rings bear fully against the tube of the scope. Usually I'll mount the bottoms of the rings and lay the scope into them and see if it will freely rotate along the axis of the scope in the ring bottoms. If it "grabs" in the rings, that is usually an indication that one of the rings is canted or misaligned with the tube and needs adjustment. Avoid placing anything inside the ring that will reduce its diameter unless it is supplied with the ring. If you put shims inside a ring that is not intended for use with them, the reduced diameter may dent the tube of the scope when tightened. I've mounted probably over a thousand scopes and can't remember any problems if the rings were square and torqued properly. That includes 416's, 50bmg's and others I don't remember. If you're around Fairbanks, I'd be happy to give you some pointers in person.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  5. #5
    Member jkb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,466

    Default

    Had a scope slip on a trophy bou put the paper strips in no problem with that scope in 15 years.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

  6. #6
    Member OKElkHunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    449

    Default Loctite

    I liked the rubber cement answer, but, I put a drop of red locktite in the bottom of each ring and have never had a scope slip. Ensure your rings are squared so you aren't pinching the scope. One drop in each is plenty, don't over do it.
    “Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong." ~Calvin Coolidge~

  7. #7
    Member shphtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    1,376

    Default

    Quality scope rings that are square will solve any slippage problem - if there is any doubt then one can lap the rings. Most lap just the bottom 1/2 but can do both. I usually use S&K rings which will obviate the "square issue" as well as any misalignment problems. Also they exert superior,even constricting force 360 degrees around the scope ring - not cheap but quality usually isn't.

  8. #8
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Scope ring lapping kit?

    I tried my hand at lapping that shphtr mentioned using this kit from MidwayUSA recently. Simple process that with patience removed some of the high spots. With practice, it looks like it would give maximum contact surface between rings and scope. It's important to mark the bases and matching rings so that you reassemble in the same way as lapping.

    Here's one kit, but they also have a kit with 1" and 30mm tools:
    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct...tnumber=227261

    Good luck.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    564

    Default

    lap them and then use rubber cement or liquid electrical tape. the burris signature rings with plastic inserts can help too

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    220

    Default True and blued

    My .480 was stripping metal from the scope and the scope was slipping every single time out. I bought a scope lapping tool and was amazed at how much material I had to take off. Once I did that, I found that many of my rings, regardless of cost, needed work. I highly recommend it, it's worth the effort. Think about it, when your rings are lapped in and fit correctly, what they're doing to your high dollar scope! When the rings are lapped in, they apply even clamping power that doesn't distort the tube.

    I'd bet anything that your rings aren't right.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default Ring alignment

    Ring alignment isn't my problem with the Warn rings and the .375 H&H. The rings slide off and on the bases easily even when barely loosenend and there is not springing or shifting as I loosened the locking levers. I always check for alignment problems and make sure everything is square and aligned properly. So far I haven't messed up a scope in over 40 years.

    The Locktite was my first thought. A very very thin coating of the liquid tape sounds good also for the heavy calibers I plan to shoot a lot.

    I've been tempted to run by Granger or Alaska Bearing and pick up a piece of 1.000" drill rod or shaft just to check esp. on two piece bases. A 1.000 inch straight reamer would be great but they are rather pricey. Since I'm mounting a new scope some extra precaution won't hurt.

    If I get a piece of the 3 ft. drill rod I can cut into 3 or 4 pieces if anyone is interesting in sharing the cost and getting a piece to make your own lappig and alignment too.


    Quote Originally Posted by Sir View Post
    My .480 was stripping metal from the scope and the scope was slipping every single time out. I bought a scope lapping tool and was amazed at how much material I had to take off. Once I did that, I found that many of my rings, regardless of cost, needed work. I highly recommend it, it's worth the effort. Think about it, when your rings are lapped in and fit correctly, what they're doing to your high dollar scope! When the rings are lapped in, they apply even clamping power that doesn't distort the tube.

    I'd bet anything that your rings aren't right.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    408

    Default suggestion...

    loctite 638 retaining compound... This stuff is awesome... I've never used it for this specific purpose but can't imagine that it wouldn't work...

    read the msds/TDS on it... ultra strong hold, heat removal (500f)...

    http://tds.loctite.com/tds5/docs/638-EN.PDF

    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct...m_campaign=649

    http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=2...INING_COMPOUND

  13. #13
    Member AKdutch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    103

    Default loctite 638 retaining compound

    "loctite 638 retaining compound... This stuff is awesome... I've never used it for this specific purpose but can't imagine that it wouldn't work...

    read the msds/TDS on it... ultra strong hold, heat removal (500f)..."

    I'm not sure I would use this product on a scope, although I'm sure it would work, once. I have used this product to help get a little more time on bearings that had spun on a shaft at the plant I worked at, in an emergency. I think this would be a very permanent solution to a slipping scope. John

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default Too much tite?

    The Loctite 638 would seem to be overkill for mounting a scope esp. since you couldn't heat it to loosen the stuff up. For scopes I think I'll stick to the blue or red stuff that is removeable without heat.

    I used to have some stuff like liquid nylon - Nylock or similar? - that acted like the plastic insert they used to put in screws that had to be adjusted but still stay in place without loosening. It should be idea for scopes as it only stuck to side it dried in place on. I'll do another search for it.


    Quote Originally Posted by AKdutch View Post
    "loctite 638 retaining compound... This stuff is awesome... I've never used it for this specific purpose but can't imagine that it wouldn't work...

    read the msds/TDS on it... ultra strong hold, heat removal (500f)..."

    I'm not sure I would use this product on a scope, although I'm sure it would work, once. I have used this product to help get a little more time on bearings that had spun on a shaft at the plant I worked at, in an emergency. I think this would be a very permanent solution to a slipping scope. John
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Lapping rings my prove to be beneficial to some, especially benchrest shooters. But my readings over the years indicates lapping will make the rings more prone to slipping. I would suggest more research before lapping rings hoping to solve slippage issues.
    Tennessee

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    220

    Default It depends....

    On the rings that I did have slipping, the problem was that the scope barrel to ring contact patch was very little. Even tightened down as much as I could stand, the rings "skinned" metal off of the scope with each shooting session. I dabbed a slim coat of dark grease on my rings and found out that I had a terrible contact patch (clamping surface) on my rings to scope. I lapped the rings down till I had about 80% contact patch (a LOT of material!!!) and the slippage/skinnage, never happened again. There was a lot more material gripping the scope, evenly. I also feel better that my tube wasn't getting distorted because I had a nice even clamping surface all the way around the tube and the width of the ring instead of small pressure points on the high points of the rings.

    I checked ALL of my rings, no matter the make, none were perfect.

    Scope tubes are kinda soft and delicate. It makes sense to spread the clamping load as evenly and firmly as possible. It's like a pop can... you can dent it with your finger but it's a lot stronger if pressure's evenly applied.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,810

    Default

    I think that Elmer Keith used shellac.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    712

    Default

    I don't have any real boomers. Biggest kickers are a lightweight 30-06 and a lightweight 350RM. I've never had a scope slip on any rifle - not one. This using standard Leupold, Ruger, Weaver, and Talley Lightweight rings. I even skim the ring bearing surface with RIG grease prior to tightening.

  19. #19
    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,943

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    ... If I get around to scoping it the .378 Weatherby could be an even bigger problem....
    If it's a Mark V, you might consider Near Mfg.:


  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    welfare state of Alaska
    Posts
    5,153

    Default Stout ring setup

    The Near rings look pretty substantial and right at home on a big rifle. I'll look up the info on them.

    If I were hunting with the .378 I'd much rather have a two piece base - I like the extra room to get to the action if something goes wrong. As a range gun it doesn't really matter.


    Quote Originally Posted by MarineHawk View Post
    If it's a Mark V, you might consider Near Mfg.:
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •