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Thread: Lil shootin'

  1. #1
    Member EricL's Avatar
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    Default Lil shootin'

    Something a little different for me. Cory, Jim, which makes more sense...to have the sight in focus or something closer??
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    EricL

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    Why not everything in focus? Just close the lens to around f/11 (use a flash if you have to), and see how it goes.

    All depends on what you want to main subject to be. For example, what is in front of the gun, the front sight, the rear sight, and so forth.

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    Member EricL's Avatar
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    Hey thanks Ray!! I only had my P&S. Next time I'll have to take the gear. Maybe have a lil more flexibility!!
    EricL

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    Member Floyd_Davidson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EricL View Post
    Something a little different for me. Cory, Jim, which makes more sense...to have the sight in focus or something closer??
    There's no info in the Exif data. Can you tell us what the focal length, sensor size, and aperture were for that shot?

    I use selective focus as an artistic tool very often, and like the effect that your image presents. The one problem I see with it is that the shoulder is what is sharply in focus, rather than the rear sight blade. I'd like it better if the point of focus were moved forward just enough to make the rear sight a bit sharper. (But how well that would work depends on the aperture and focal length of the lens, and could end up losing some of the effects from having everything forward of that out of focus, particularly the front sight.)

    Another variation would be to try isolating only the front sight. I'm not sure that would be as dramatic. the last variation (which I probably would not care for) would be to move the hyperfocal distance such that the background and the front sight, but not the rear sight, are in focus.

    For selective focus the longer the focal length (actually it is the higher the magnification), the larger the sensor size, and the larger the aperture the narrower the depth of field. Hence ideally a camera with a full frame sensor using an 85mm f/1.4 or a 100mm f/2, or the closest you can muster up, will give the most easily manipulated functionality.

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    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    Hey Eric,
    Sorry I did not see that sooner. Whenever I am shooting experimental shots that I have not tried before I try and maximize my time and make sure I get at least one shot I am happy with. I would try to shoot it at multiple different aperatures and focal lengths and focus on various parts of the scene in a shot like this. That way I can review the shots after the fact and look at the exif info to see what worked and what did not. After doing that for a while you will quickly start seeing what works for you and you will get more proficient at getting the shots that work. Hope that helps!

    Cory
    US Air Force - retired and Wildlife photographer

    To follow my photography adventures check out my facebook page

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