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Thread: Can't get my wall tent flaps closed...

  1. #1
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    Default Can't get my wall tent flaps closed...

    Hello everyone. I've recently purchased a 12x14x5 canvas internal frame wall tent from a buddy of mine. The frame he had was an adjustable angle one and sucked bad. I bought an angle kit and am trying to build the frame myself. Problem is I can't quite seem to get the door flaps to close all the way. I was hoping to to post some pictures and have some more experienced wall tenters see what the heck I'm doing wrong (pointing and laughing is totally understood). I've got it set up in my back yard now and can take some pictures in the morning.

    Thanks in advance for any and all advice!

  2. #2
    Member slimm's Avatar
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    Sounds like you set it up with the doorway unzipped,, you need to leave it zipped during set up..
    Also don't stake down the front especially the corners..
    Once you get it set up and everything working right, its a good idea to soak the tent and let it dry completely around your frame. That will eliminate a bunch of hassle in the future..

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    Slimm, thank you for taking the time to respond. Setting it up with the flaps closed makes good sense, as does not staking down the front. I'll keep working with it and hopefully get it "mountain worthy." Got any more hot tips?

  4. #4

    Default then angle of the dangle....

    If you're still having trouble setting up with the doors closed, look to two other possible solutions:

    1. the angle of the joint between the roof and wall is opened up a bit too much. When set up the wall pipes should be 90 degrees verticle to the ground. Make sure they do not angle outward. They should be straight up from the ground. If not straight up and down, look to bend the angle joints slightly.

    2. the length of the roof pipes might need to be cut just a bit. Canvas wall tents shrink each time they get wet. In time you'll need to make shorter the lengths of pipe to accomodate the shrinkage.

    Davis Tent of Denver Colorado has a nice instruction manual and a video for Internal frame Wall tents.
    Yea though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for the shadow is mine and so is the valley. Thy Glock and thy M14 comfort me in days of civil unrest and terror

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    Thanks again for the advice. I will check the angle of the corners to make sure they correct. I'm headed over to Colorado Wall Tent now to check it out.

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    What I found out with my 8' x 10' tent's frame is that if I cut the frame pieces too wide, I could not close the door. I used a set of nine adjustable angles, three for the ridge, and three for each eave.

    The next thing I did before cutting the pipes (electrical tubing from Home Depot) to length was to carefully spread the tent on the floor with the front facing UP and the door flaps closed properly. Then placed the ridge angle on the tent's ridge, another on the left eave, and another on the other eave.

    The next step was to measure the distance from the floor edge of the tent to the inside of the eave angle, and next from the inside of the eave's angle to the inside of the ridge's angle.

    The next step was to turn the tent around on the floor, side facing UP, so that I could measure the length. I placed one end or corner angle at one end of the tent, and another at the other end, and then measured the distance from the inside of the angle to the inside of the other angle.

    Then I cut all the pipe using the measurements I had taken, then put the frame together and threw the tent over the top, but the doors would not close. What I did was to carefully shorten the roof pipe pieces to make the frame narrower, but not too much. Just enough so there is an extra 1/2" of space between the tent and the frame.
    ----------
    That said, the easiest thing to do is to print the frame building instructions provided by the tent maker. You should be able to see a drawing at their website. Just download the whole page with the instructions for you to use. Otherwise just look at the measurements they ask you to take if you are going to buy their frames, and figure it from there.

    Here is one (look for your tent size, and then measure it as they ask). When you cut the pipe, just remember to first measure the distance from inside of one ridge to the next, because the pipe will have to fit right inside of the angles:
    http://forevermontana.com/tent_frames.htm

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    Ray, excellent information! Thanks for taking the time to reply to my post.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by weebeedie View Post
    Ray, excellent information! Thanks for taking the time to reply to my post.
    You are welcomed.

    Keep in mind that I made a mistake in the last paragraph by the link. I should have said "to measure from the inside area of one of the angles to the inside area of the other angle." That will give you to length of the pipe you are to cut. For mine I used 1-1/4" electrical conduit because it was cheaper than aluminum. But it's real heavy, and that' could be a problem. Since I load everything on a meat trailer and ride to the campsite, it's not too bad. But aluminum would be a lot easier to transport.

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