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Thread: Savage Varminter won't shoot

  1. #1

    Default Savage Varminter won't shoot

    After reading all the nice things said about Savages I bought a new stainless varminter with laminated stock,mounted a Bushnell 2400 6x24 and the first two groups went into 1/4 ". Great! Then everything went downhill and by 150 shots it was a 5" grouper. Everything was checked ,tightened or changed. Factory ammo and 15 different reloads used but still a bummer.Then I found the front top part of the receiver was .020" lower than the rear part.The distributor checked a few of his stock and found several others the same and offered to shim the front mount .020 but I don't think I like that on a new rifle. He's testing it himself over the Easter break to make sure I'm not a dope so it will be interesting to see the outcome. I'm wondering if anyone else out there has had the same experience. It's a 22-250.

  2. #2
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    Obviously since the rifle grouped well in the beginning something has come loose. Fail to see why the difference in the receiver measurements would affect accuracy in any way after you shot those first 1/4 inch groups. I would bet it is a loose scope mount or loose action screws.
    Tennessee

  3. #3

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    If everything is tight, I would clean the barrel with Wipeout.

    I have a Kimber that was so full of copper after 50 rounds, you could barely see any steel on the rifling. The bore looked like smeered copper. The groups on that rifle have always been poor.

  4. #4
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    I would tend to believe that the bore is fouled as well. High velocity cartridges can foul up pretty quickly. A thourough cleaning with a good copper remover would probably be in order. Let us know how this all turns out......
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  5. #5

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    Never much been one for doing all of the barrel break in stuff. However I have paid for it on occasion.

    I have a almost new Ruger 77 in 243 that I zeroed in last fall and got 3/4" groups with it. I then hunted with the gun all winter and probably shot 100 rounds through it. I shot it on paper the other day for the first time since the original sight in and the barley got 2" groups. I know without a doubt that it just needs a good scrubbing. I've been this route before and a good cleaning is usually the cure!

    As for your Savage receiver tolerances? I'm betting they are within factory specs. If everything on every receiver was machined to zero tolerances in accordance with the rifles bore then there would be no point in having windage and elevation adjustments on scopes. It'd just be a matter of clamping them on and they'd be zeroed but since it ain't a perfect world we have adjustment knobs.

  6. #6
    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    I would also guess it is fouling in the new barrel. The more you shoot, the slower a barrel fouls up.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

  7. #7
    New member George's Avatar
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    Yep, first thought is copper fouling. Get all the copper out. Use a bore guide, good rod, good jag and clean often.

    The difference in receiver contact heights makes no difference as long as the stock is also inletted (molded?) to match.

    If the copper fouling and other obvious things are taken care of and still the same problem them look into bedding the action.

  8. #8

    Default I've been cleaning

    between every five shot group and if the new barrel got a build up of copper that could do it ,and that's removable. As to the two halves of the receiver being different heights,that can't help otherwise people wouldn't lap their scope rings for perfect alignment,especially benchresters,and surely it's not up to factory specs when it's made on a CNC machine capable of .0005 tolerances,not.02 .I can imagine my scope bent like a banana and thats not how they work best. Anyway it will be interesting to hear the distributors report after Easter,how it shot for him. Apart from the grouping it's a really nice rifle.

  9. #9
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    It sounds like a nicked crown to me. Stick a Q-tip down the bore and see if it catches any fibers.

  10. #10
    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    Unless your scope went jabberwokky, there is no reason I can think of that the mounting sufaces not being perfect would cause groups to open. If the scope and bases are tight the gun is still pointing to the same place, regardless of how screwed up the ring heights are on the receiver. I too vote for copper buildup, get some wipeout and give it a try, you'll be amazed at what comes flowing out of there, some guns look like melted Smurfs pouring out the end, to steal Ken's analogy.

    BTW, you would be amazed at the lack of uniformity in mass produced recievers these days, when you start to check with a good indicator you find all sorts of funny stuff, IE base holes crooked, drilled off center, reciever rings shaped like eggs on the outside, heck I even saw one last week that they forgot to tap a hole on. But with all that being said, we still have the most accurate out of the box rifles on average ever produced, just ask someone older than me how many factory rifles they owned in the old days that would routinely shoot half an inch out of the box.

  11. #11
    Member HCL's Avatar
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    Savages require a specific torque on the stock bolts in a specific sequence. Had the same problem with my BVSS, call Savage and they can give you the info per your rifle. If you tightened or loosened them you will change the zero and grouping. Kinda of a pain, but worth it.
    Hope this helps.
    Mike

  12. #12

    Default Savage Varminter shoots ok now.

    The Savage distributor test fired my Varminter in 22-250 over the Easter weekend and shot a 3" group same as I did. Because of the .02 difference in receiver height he shimmed the front mount .02 and tried again and fired a 9 shot group into .9 of an inch. what a huge improvement, but probably not as good as a Savage Varminter is capable of,I think.I still have the option of refund or replace.This weekend will tell.

  13. #13

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    I might not be tracking well here, but.....if there was a difference in height of the bases, why would groups expand? I can understand a different POI but not group size expansion.

    One other thing on barrel cleaning (which no longer sounds like the issue)....when they say "run wet patches through until there's no longer bluing," they mean it. I have always been one of those "close enough" guys when it comes to bore cleaning. (I have a fairly short attention span.) Recently, I had a brain fart and used a bronze brush with an ammonia-based bore cleaner. (I know, I know....long story.) Anyhow, I went after a fairly fouled bore with Sweet's and really did run patches until they ran clean. What was fascinating to me is that the bluing started to decrease, then it was almost like I hit a new vein of copper, with the blue coloring increasing and actually seeing shiny pieces of metal on the patches. Then, it stopped and the patches turned white. So, between a nylon bore brush and lots of wet patches, I'm confident I got down to clean metal. YMMV

  14. #14
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fremont View Post
    I might not be tracking well here, but.....if there was a difference in height of the bases, why would groups expand? I can understand a different POI but not group size expansion.
    Well because it could bind the scope in a way that it’s causing the reticle to settle in a different spot inside after recoil. Thus the rifle is aiming at a different place even though the reticle is held to the same point of aim for each shot. Loose or other scope mounting issues will do the same thing and can drive you nuts trying to find the problem.
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    I think the coolest thing about this forum is learning all the technical lingo from gunsmiths and such. Todays word being 'jabberwokky'. Pure awesomeness!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tenmm View Post
    I think the coolest thing about this forum is learning all the technical lingo from gunsmiths and such. Todays word being 'jabberwokky'. Pure awesomeness!
    Well that does about sum it up into one word as good as anything.
    Jabberwokky: not working properly, acting strange, abnormal, absurd, nonsense, non-sensical.
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  17. #17

    Default Leopold shim did the trick

    With a .02 shim under the front mount the group came down to .9" for 9 shots so that must have been the problem, the scope was bent down at the front and the finely made scope innards couldn't handle it.

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