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Thread: mono vs braid

  1. #1
    Member Floridascuba's Avatar
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    Default mono vs braid

    I am curious to know if there is any issues with braid line. I love braid line. I use it on most of my reels except for my trolling outfits. Is there any issues to braid in Alaska? Is mono better all around?

  2. #2

    Default mono for me

    I've got both rigged on my spinning reels and baitcasting reels and I prefer mono to braid when it comes to freshwater fishing. I find I like a little bit of stretch in my line on the strike or the fight of a salmon. Kind of a bungee effect. Others will swear by braid but I've watched my fair share of rod holders break on the strike and fishing rods break during the middle of a run. I've never seen this happen with mono (except on the cheapest of gear).

    In the ocean I'm 100% braid.

  3. #3

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    This is a question that gets beat to death on all the fishing forums I visit. I am a Braid person, but it depends on what you are use to fishing with. I have no problem with braid on Kings but I've had problems with mono. But like tcman says he likes mono and has had problems with braid, so I believe it depends on what you feel comfortable using. If you like braid and like fishing with it then that's what you should use.

  4. #4
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Default

    I use both. Halibut I use Braided. Mono for everything else.
    There are some people when combat fishing hate people using braided. Line is very thin, make it hard sometimes to untangle. Other then that besides getting cuts from braided line I like it.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
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  5. #5
    Member Larsenvega's Avatar
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    Default

    To each his own. I have braided line on all of my baitcasters and spinning reels (fresh and salt). I enjoy knowing that I have a strong hookset from the instant the fish hits. I also like being able to fit more line on the spool due to the smaller diameter of braided line. Braided line also doesn't have the "memory" that retains the coiled shape of a spool, and tends to last longer than comparable mono.

    As for the previous post... Your gear will not explode or break apart unless you have a complete disregard for the weight and strength capacities of your gear, or your one of those guys that think the drag should be set so tight that you'd swear He-Man broke into your garage the night before and cranked that crap down. People like to complain that you get bad bird nests in baitcasters when using braid, but simply learning how to use the magnetic brake and proper thumb pressure will make them things of the past. I liken it to learning how to drive a stick for the first time. Once you've got it down, it's second nature and you don't think much about it, it just works.

    Using a good quality braid and some common sense, you will do great and not have to fuss with the knicks, abrasion, or stretch that comes along with mono. Just remeber, set your drag right and make sure you aren't exceeding the limits of your gear!

  6. #6
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Default

    Power pro is great stuff. Fireline, not so much. Not all braids are created equal but I do love them.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  7. #7
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Default

    We should make this a sticky, as it has been discussed before.

    The upside of braid is, it is very sensitive due to low stretch, you can cast it further (for same weight as mono), you can either put alot on a reel due to small dia, or run heavier line than you would with mono, this is an advantage for streems with heavy current or lots of competition where you want to get a fish in quickly.

    There are many downsides of braid. You have to load it onto the reel under tension or it will dig into the reel and you'll break it off, or break your rod, it is more expensive, it puts alot more stress on your rod and the fish, some knots reduce it's strength by 50%, so many people go with heavier braid than mono due to the knot issue, it'll cut through your hand like a buzz saw if a fish runs while grabbing it, it is easily cut off on rocks, though you can use a mono topshot to give some of the mono advantages at the terminal end.

    I love braid for bottom fishing in the ocean, I have yet to see an advantage to braid in other applications, for the way I fish. I've used mostly power pro and tuffline, but plan to get a large spool of Daiwa PE-5 boat braid for my bottom fishing rods. On two of my salmon rods I use 20# maxima, on the other two 30# braid, my jigging rods use 50 and 65# braid, I have 80# on my meat stick but let other folks use the pool cue as I'd rather run a lighter jig stick.

  8. #8
    Member Crab_n_fish's Avatar
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    Default

    When using braided line(s), please be aware of your "Bill Dance power hook-set," meaning with little line stretch you'll soon learn that yanking a rod tip upward with such powerful force results in ripping a single or treble hook from a fish's mouth much easier than with monofilament.

    Other disadvantages with it, is that such line will cause abrasions in lesser quality rod guides. With such cuts already in place, every crank of the reel and one is further destroying the high priced line.

    On the other hand, to speak fondly of the line, if using braided on a spinning reel you'll experience little to no "memory" ...(Memory is that twisty-twirly appearance one notices with monofilament as it comes off the spool!)

    Also, if you are prone to snagging and breaking off, use a lower lb test monofilament or fluorocarbon leader to prevent the loss of the higher test main line.

  9. #9
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Float/eggs or float/jig.... BRAID

    Backbouncing.... BRAID

    Backtrolling magnum plugs.... BRAID

    Deep jigging..... BRAID

    Halibut/bottomfish.... BRAID

    Pitching crankbaits/plugs.... BRAID

    Driftfishing.... mono

    Casting hardware.... mono.


    ****

    Braid is MUCH more versatile.... and here's why.

    Braid CAN suffice for the last two applications.

    Mono SUCKS for everything else.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenaiIce View Post
    This is a question that gets beat to death on all the fishing forums I visit. I am a Braid person, but it depends on what you are use to fishing with. I have no problem with braid on Kings but I've had problems with mono. But like tcman says he likes mono and has had problems with braid, so I believe it depends on what you feel comfortable using. If you like braid and like fishing with it then that's what you should use.

    This all just comes down to the best tool for the job; mono is good in some applications, braid, fluro and copolomer in others
    Fish when you can, work when you have to.

  11. #11
    Member Crab_n_fish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jarredbehrendt View Post
    This all just comes down to the best tool for the job; mono is good in some applications, braid, fluro and copolomer in others
    I agree, Jarredbehrendt. One advantage with monofilament is when one is combat-fishing. Ever get tangled with another's line? I have with braid and it was a living nightmare to untangle! Conversely, when combat fishing with stout high-test braid, one can lock a reel's drag down and wench those fish in much faster with little interference with your neighbor's line.

  12. #12
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    I agree that mono should be used for combat fishing - it is WAY easier to untangle. Braid is GREAT for saltwater fishing. But one thing that drives me NUTS is people who complain about a salmon rod breaking (with a 20-30 lb rating as stated on the rod) when they are using 50-60 lb braided line because it is so much smaller in diameter and they think that there is a less chance that they will loose a fish because the're using a much stronger line on that rod. Your rod is only rated by the strength of the line - not the diameter of the line.

  13. #13
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    Ditto what Doc posted except that braid also excells when casting hardware. No memory, cast a little farther, and you can feel the pulse of the lure.

    Drifting with braid sucks though. You get hung up one time drifting with a few other boats around you and you will see what I mean.

  14. #14
    Member arcticfox77's Avatar
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    Default heres what works for me

    if you are spooling braid on a baitcaster, make sure to start your spool with mono. lay down a nice foundation maybe 25 or 30 yards or so. then attatch your braid and mono with a nail knot, finish spooling your braid, and end it with tying on a barrel swivel. this way you can attach a mono leader and you have the best of both worlds, solid hooksets with a little bit of give.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Crab_n_fish View Post
    I agree, Jarredbehrendt. One advantage with monofilament is when one is combat-fishing. Ever get tangled with another's line? I have with braid and it was a living nightmare to untangle! Conversely, when combat fishing with stout high-test braid, one can lock a reel's drag down and wench those fish in much faster with little interference with your neighbor's line.
    I guess I wouldn't know about that since I never do the combat thing. Tried it once and was a complete nightmare. But that was before I bought my boats, so hopefully I'll never have to do it again.

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