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Thread: To the newbies...

  1. #1

    Default To the newbies...

    It is so worth it to start obedience training when your pup is young and continue it as they grow older. Took Belli (2 year old female lab) on a walk tonight. I did not have her on leash. I let her walk freely on the bike trail until I saw anyone approaching and then would call her to heel until they had passed. She did a GREAT job. We passed a couple of families whose dogs were walking them and I could hear the oohs and ahhs over her nice manners.
    Just wanted to say that it is hard work to train and stick with it, but the rewards are great. If you need help, there are several groups who are willing. Just ask for it.
    "It's the journey that's important, with experience and knowledge to be gained along the way, in the company of our faithful dogs and our good friends."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  2. #2
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    Default this is perfect

    I have a 4 month old dog that seems to smart for his own good! The one thing that bugs me the most is when he knows we are leaving and I have to put him in his "Kennel" he won't come to me! He will sit down and look at me like "yah right" Other than that he does good. He seems like he has a strong personality! The few times I punished him for peeing in the house or chewing up cords He would stay mad at me for a long time. He's part German Shep and part Korelian Bear dog!

    Anyways thought this was the perfect post to add this to when I read it!
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

  3. #3

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    Four months is not to young to start training. Let me start with your crate training issue. Most dogs love their crates if they are not used as a means of punishment. I start mine out by putting them in the crate and feeding them treats in there. They enter their crate upon the command to "kennel".
    I just do it at random times during the day and at night when I know they are not potty trained. For now, when you put the dog in the kennel, praise him and give him treats while saying "Kennel".

    If I were you, I would find a dog training class as soon as possible. This pup needs to be learning to walk on a leash and learning various commands. At this point though, I would be using positive reinforcement (treats and praise) to train your pup. Look at it this way, is the pup more likely to cooperate with "Come here or I'll beat your *****" or "Good boy, here is a treat." As the pup ages you can ask for more from an obedience standpoint, but for now, treats and praise should be the order of the day.
    "It's the journey that's important, with experience and knowledge to be gained along the way, in the company of our faithful dogs and our good friends."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  4. #4
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    Default I agree

    I don't use his "kennel" as punishment. He actually lays in his kennel during the day. He just dosn't like to be left home alone so when he knows we are going some where he tends to not want to go to his kennel. He is a smart dog. At night when I'm ready to go to bed I'll turn the Tv off and as I stand up he will get up from whever he is and go lay in his kennel! The only reason I still lock him up at night is because he is teething and chews on everything. He has bones, chew toys, etc. I have been working with him useing treats. We signed up for a training program. It's 8 weeks long 1 time a week.
    Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

  5. #5

    Default

    Sorry to have assumed.....
    Sounds like you just need to work on basic obedience of coming when called.
    The class will really help with that.
    Feeding a treat in the crate as you leave might really help too.
    Peanut butter filled kongs are also appealing as well.
    "It's the journey that's important, with experience and knowledge to be gained along the way, in the company of our faithful dogs and our good friends."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  6. #6

    Default

    on the topic of the command "kennel" I think the command "wait" is really important. I thought Banks this command whenever I'm letting him out of the kennel and it didn't take long at all for him to catch on. It also applies when you're opening the door/garage/truck etc. Now that he knows the command I'll open the back door and he'll look at me for the command to "go play" or "outside".

    This command really helped me out during the winter because Banks was riding in the back seat of the truck (due to the cold temps). Well, I would open up the back door and I'd grab the gun...ammo...jacket etc etc and he would be sitting there waiting on the command to come out. Not to mention if you ever had to stop on the highway it could be dangerous for your dog to just go jumping out.

    it's an easy command to teach and it'll pay dividends down the road.

  7. #7
    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    Default

    I agree the wait command is a very important one, case in point I trained my dog to not go out the front door until I tell him he can. On Christmas eve I was letting him out to potty, and opened the door and cow and calf moose were standing there, about 10 feet away. I can't imagine what would have happened if he had just bolted out the door. But I am sure it wouldn't have been good.

    I learned everything I know about dog training from Baron Rae, and his crawl walk run philosophy works wonders on dog training. Just remember to have patience with the dog, and make training fun for them. My dog gets really excited when I break out his e-collar. Because he associates it with fun.

    I firmly believe that there is no such thing as a bad dog, only a bad trainer.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

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