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Thread: taildragger cert.

  1. #1
    Member cjustinm's Avatar
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    Default taildragger cert.

    if you attend a flight school with only tricycle type planes and want to become certified with a taildragger down the road what does that take? Is it just finding the proper plane and have a CFI put in a certain amount of hours with you? The school im looking at is in the lower 48 while im down there for work and unfortunately they dont have any taildraggers.

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    Member PatrickH's Avatar
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    Default tail endorsement

    It depends on what kind of flying you want to do. If you will just be going airport to airport then most tailwheel training will be fine. Just be sure you really know what you are doing before the instructor signs you off. I have heard some scary stories from pilots who got the endorsement, but they did not have the skills needed to be safe.
    However if you will be doing off-airport landings you are better off getting your tailwheel endorsement from someone who has more experience in that kind of flying. Those instructors are hard to find, but you are more likely to find someone like that here in Alaska. If you can find someone in your local area it is even better.
    You will need a couple of hours of ground instruction and about six to eight in the airplane. It depends on how well you perform the required tasks. Once you are off the ground it is the same as any other small plane. On the ground you need to educate your feet to dance on the pedals making many small corrections. That is the biggest difference from a tricycle to me. You will also be better off training in the kind of airplane you plan to fly. Each is a little different, and some are more forgiving than others.

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default

    Most folks get an additional 5 to 8 hours in a tail-wheel to get their TW sign-off. Who you get it from makes a big difference.

    Jay Baldwin in Palmer is super for tail-wheel.

    Around Homer Tom Young for tail-wheel and me for floats.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  4. #4

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    I hate to jump in this as I do not have a TW sign off, but from what I have seen I would confine myself to gravel for my first 20 or so solo landings.

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    Thumbs up get it

    If you have the ability and oppertunity to get a TW endorsement get it!

    Even if you don't have one and don't see flying tailwheels in your future. Get the endorsement and use it when ever possible, it will teach your feet how to save your life. I mean that litereally.

    You've seen the threads about spins?, well,...... your feet are what will save you when the time come.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I started work on mine last fall, but didn't get to finish it up before the snow came due to some electrical problems on the plane. I'm hoping to get back after it in a couple of weeks. My goal is off-airport stuff, but I figure I'll give myself a year or more to work up to that. When I do it, I'll certainly get a pilot to go along with me that really knows their stuff.

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    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Just be careful not to watch Big Rocks and Long Props before you start.

    Attached Images Attached Images
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    Member avidflyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I started work on mine last fall, but didn't get to finish it up before the snow came due to some electrical problems on the plane. I'm hoping to get back after it in a couple of weeks. My goal is off-airport stuff, but I figure I'll give myself a year or more to work up to that. When I do it, I'll certainly get a pilot to go along with me that really knows their stuff.
    I started in a TD and my instructor knew what I would be doing. From day one it was off airport work cause he knew darn good and well as soon as he signed me off to solo I would not be pounding pavement. Due to previous flying with friends, and many many years of competition aerobatic RC flying I was signed off for solo in 5.3 hrs. Contrary to what most "pilots" think, RC flying will help you in the cockpit. Control inputs for recovery come automatic and it really does give you one heck of a leg up (funny it does not work the other way around cause a "real pilot" thinks it is just a toy and he can fly anything with wings LOL ) If you have the right instructor, and a good head on your shoulders, off airport work does not take years and years. If you have good decision making skills you will be way ahead of the game. Knowing your aircraft and what you are both capable of doing is 99% of off airport work.

    That all being said, dont think you can jump in a cub after 5 hrs and follow your buddy out to a nasty cub strip he has been flying in and out of for years and make the plane do what he is doing with it.

    just my .02

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    Drew at Above Alaska in Talkeetna is a good guy to see for tail wheel training and off airport/bush flying training.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by avidflyer View Post
    If you have the right instructor, and a good head on your shoulders, off airport work does not take years and years. If you have good decision making skills you will be way ahead of the game. Knowing your aircraft and what you are both capable of doing is 99% of off airport work.

    That all being said, dont think you can jump in a cub after 5 hrs and follow your buddy out to a nasty cub strip he has been flying in and out of for years and make the plane do what he is doing with it.

    just my .02
    Good advice - thanks. My instructor does know that I'll be doing off airport work, but it is me who wants to ease into it. The cub I'm flying belongs to my father, and while I'll likely purchase it from him someday, flying someone else's plane brings with it a heightened level of responsibility - or at least it feels like it. Additionally, the instructor I'm with doesn't specialize in taildragger work. He does it and I feel like I'm being taught well, but for learning off airport work I'd rather be with someone who flies a cub almost exclusively and has a lot of off airport landings to their credit.

    As for the "years and years" comment, I don't plan on waiting years to start practicing, but I do figure it'll be years before I can go sheep hunting comfortably while bringing my wife along in the back seat. I just want to be smart about it.

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    Member PatrickH's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Acts

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    but for learning off airport work I'd rather be with someone who flies a cub almost exclusively and has a lot of off airport landings to their credit.
    You should book time with Jay Baldwin at Alaska's Cub Training Specialists (ACTS) http://www.youflyalaska.com/ He is out at Wolf Lake. He has been out of state, but he should be back within a few weeks. You won't regret it. It will put you years ahead of trial and error.
    Patrick

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatrickH View Post
    You should book time with Jay Baldwin at Alaska's Cub Training Specialists (ACTS) http://www.youflyalaska.com/ He is out at Wolf Lake. He has been out of state, but he should be back within a few weeks. You won't regret it. It will put you years ahead of trial and error.
    Patrick
    Awesome. Great to know! Things will be a little nutty this summer with kid #2 due in June, but if I can manage the time, I'll certainly do that this year. If not soon, then later for sure. I want to be as well prepared as possible.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Thanks again, Patrick. I just looked over his Bush Checkout training, and that looks like exactly the type of training I'd like to recieve once I get my feet wet.

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    I'm starting ground school at Elmendorf on the 19th. It is my plan to get private pilot license by the end of summer. I will be moving to Kotz next summer (2011) and flying from there, so I know I will need to get a TW endorsement. How long do you recommend flying before getting in a TD?

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    Member woodman6437's Avatar
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    What about Fairbanks? I'm close to finishing my private with Warbelow's and I think my next step will be a TD cert.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDREAMER View Post
    I'm starting ground school at Elmendorf on the 19th. It is my plan to get private pilot license by the end of summer. I will be moving to Kotz next summer (2011) and flying from there, so I know I will need to get a TW endorsement. How long do you recommend flying before getting in a TD?
    Start training in a tail dragger from the very beginning if you can and then transition to
    nosewheel. You'll be a better pilot for doing it that way. If not able to start in tail draggers, try to get4 or 5 hours of tail dragger instruction before you solo.

  17. #17

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    If you are looking in Fairbanks I am doing a high performance/tailwheel endorsement in my Maule or I can instruct in your plane. Give me a call if you are interested.

    Andy 347-seven two two two

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