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Thread: Remington 700 bolt broke

  1. #1
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
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    Default Remington 700 bolt broke

    I picked up a new Remington 700 XCR II today. Brought it home and was adjusting the trigger, opening and closing the bolt. Actually put in a once fired empty case to see how it chambered. Shoved the bolt closed and the handle fell on the floor. How could this happen? Looks like the silver solder, if that is what they use, is discolored part of the way. I guess I will take it to the local authorized Remington repair dealer and let them deal with it. Good thing it didn't happen in the bush.
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    About 2 or so years ago their seemed to be a rash of these. Bolts falling off due to bad soldering (sp). Just like any product one gets out of the doors with flaws as you said it is a good thing it didn't happen while out hunting.

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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    In the 1970's this was so vary common that Remington changed to oven brazing of the bolt handle to the bolt body, I don't know what made them change back?
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  4. #4

    Default bolts

    It happens on occasion. Sucks though. I have never had it happen to one of my Remingtons but I did have one of my Winchester Classics do the same thing after about 400 rounds. It is an easy fix for the gunsmith but it does give you a bit of doubt about if it could happen again. Ruger and pre 64 Winchesters are ones with one piece bolts. I have used Remingtons for most of my hunts but this is something that is always at the back of my mind.

  5. #5
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    Default One piece bolts

    This has been happening ever since the Rem. 700 came out way back in '63.

    One piece bolts are made in one piece for a very good reason!
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
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    TVFINAK...Sent you a pm yesterday, I would like to chat with you about your 220 rocket post Thanks Mark

  7. #7
    hap
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    For as much air time as this gets on the 'net I wonder why so many smiths with hundreds of 700 repairs and upgrades per year see so few. One smith I know says he has seen one bolt handle off and the shooter had used a 2x4 to open a sticky bolt.

    I have never had one come off... I think this is one of the most inflated 700 failures, based on very few, but very well-publicized events...
    art

  8. #8

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    Send it to Dan at accu-tig and he will tig weld the handle on. Then you will know it will never come off again.

  9. #9
    Member AKdutch's Avatar
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    Default Broken bolt

    I have a Remington Model 7. My bolt handle came of the exact same way you described. I was only 2 days away from my moose hunt and tok it to a smith to repair. He silver soldered it back on. I brought a spare rifle just in case, and was very glad I did. The bolt came off again after two rounds fired. I went back to the smith and explained what happened and he said it was my fault cause I was working the bolt too hard. I called BS.

    I sent the bolt to another smith and he TIG welded it back on. Have not had any problem since. John

  10. #10
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    Default Yep-

    What is wrong with openning a bolt with a chunk of 2x4 if that is the only way to get a stuck case out? I have it used that method more than one in my many years of shooting.

    I have heard and read of exactly ZERO cases of bolt handles comming off of on the many millions of mausers, enfields, pre-64 Mdl 70s, Remington Mdl 30s, 03 Springfields, Ruger 77s etc.

    Of course the gun firing when you take the safety off does deserve more publicity due to the safety aspects. Not many people are going to get killed when bolt handle breaks off unless a bear is charging you.


    Quote Originally Posted by hap View Post
    For as much air time as this gets on the 'net I wonder why so many smiths with hundreds of 700 repairs and upgrades per year see so few. One smith I know says he has seen one bolt handle off and the shooter had used a 2x4 to open a sticky bolt.

    I have never had one come off... I think this is one of the most inflated 700 failures, based on very few, but very well-publicized events...
    art
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    In the 1970's this was so vary common that Remington changed to oven brazing of the bolt handle to the bolt body, I don't know what made them change back?
    Beeg AL:

    Do you KNOW, if there's a way to KNOW, if a Rem. 700 Bolt is gonna break off on ya? OR, do I hafta be GENTLE, with the 2, 700s I have????

    They were both made in the early 60s.

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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    What is wrong with openning a bolt with a chunk of 2x4 if that is the only way to get a stuck case out? I have it used that method more than one in my many years of shooting.

    I have heard and read of exactly ZERO cases of bolt handles comming off of on the many millions of mausers, enfields, pre-64 Mdl 70s, Remington Mdl 30s, 03 Springfields, Ruger 77s etc.

    Of course the gun firing when you take the safety off does deserve more publicity due to the safety aspects. Not many people are going to get killed when bolt handle breaks off unless a bear is charging you.
    tvf
    Of the incredible number of 700s out there (more than twice as many 700s as any two other models combined) the claims of said 700 firing on safety release are another inflated number in my direct experience and opinion.

    The infamous MT case of the woman killing her son through a horse trailer, which Remington settled out of court, is a perfect example. She claimed the safety was defective yet it was not repeatable. She clearly violated a primary rule by pointing her rifle in an unsafe direction. I cannot begin to imagine what she went through personally.

    I fix and play with 700 triggers a bunch and I have seen many that were extremely unsafe. There are several internet sites with adjustment instructions written by clueless Bubbas that lead people into incredibly unsafe areas...

    Many say to adjust sear engagement and then reduce it as the pull weight is reduced???!!! And some say to remove a coil from the trigger weight spring???!!! And there are plenty more gems. The result is a lot of unsafe 700 triggers.

    But just to keep from going completely away from the OP's situation... I think the cyclic nature of most manufacturers' QC coupled with 700 volume would create far more problems than we hear about. Bolt handle failures seem to be of two basic types; immediate failure after limited use and much delayed failure after abuse... I am still waiting to see the first of either in mine...
    art

  13. #13
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm with aklefty on this. If you are suspicious of a bolt handle being secure, Rem, Winchester or other, send it to Dan at Acu-tig. It'll be a one time permanent fix. Fast, friendly service and very knowledgeable. I've had a number of bolts tigged over the years by him and had zero complaints/ problems. Top notch, quality work.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by hap View Post
    tvf
    Of the incredible number of 700s out there (more than twice as many 700s as any two other models combined) the claims of said 700 firing on safety release are another inflated number in my direct experience and opinion.

    The infamous MT case of the woman killing her son through a horse trailer, which Remington settled out of court, is a perfect example. She claimed the safety was defective yet it was not repeatable. She clearly violated a primary rule by pointing her rifle in an unsafe direction. I cannot begin to imagine what she went through personally.

    I fix and play with 700 triggers a bunch and I have seen many that were extremely unsafe. There are several internet sites with adjustment instructions written by clueless Bubbas that lead people into incredibly unsafe areas...

    Many say to adjust sear engagement and then reduce it as the pull weight is reduced???!!! And some say to remove a coil from the trigger weight spring???!!! And there are plenty more gems. The result is a lot of unsafe 700 triggers.

    But just to keep from going completely away from the OP's situation... I think the cyclic nature of most manufacturers' QC coupled with 700 volume would create far more problems than we hear about. Bolt handle failures seem to be of two basic types; immediate failure after limited use and much delayed failure after abuse... I am still waiting to see the first of either in mine...
    art
    Hap,

    What is your def of "unsafe"?

    I have adjusted my 700 triggers after reading a combination of the online instructions and it seemed to work very well. I have a light and very crisp break with no creep and am very satisfied with them. After the adjustment, I gave them both vigorous "safety" tests by working and slamming the bolt with safe on and off, stoutlly thumping the butt end on the carpet and trying with over exagerated force to pull the trigger with the sfae on, dozens of times. So I am curious what your dfeinition of unsafe is?

  15. #15
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    Default Not an issue

    All the guns I hunt with have one piece bolts so it just isn't an issue with me

    Wonder if Dan will weld up some drilled and tapped holes in some rifle receivers I have? I sure this repair would be of interest to a number of us with nice guns that someone had modified at one time or another.

    Quote Originally Posted by gunbugs View Post
    I'm with aklefty on this. If you are suspicious of a bolt handle being secure, Rem, Winchester or other, send it to Dan at Acu-tig. It'll be a one time permanent fix. Fast, friendly service and very knowledgeable. I've had a number of bolts tigged over the years by him and had zero complaints/ problems. Top notch, quality work.
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  16. #16
    hap
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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    Hap,

    What is your def of "unsafe"?

    I have adjusted my 700 triggers after reading a combination of the online instructions and it seemed to work very well. I have a light and very crisp break with no creep and am very satisfied with them. After the adjustment, I gave them both vigorous "safety" tests by working and slamming the bolt with safe on and off, stoutlly thumping the butt end on the carpet and trying with over exagerated force to pull the trigger with the sfae on, dozens of times. So I am curious what your dfeinition of unsafe is?
    I have purchased, or had brought to me for repair literally dozens of 700 triggers that could not pass any of your safety checks. Inadequate sear engagement and/or shortened springs and/or rounded sear surfaces... and other things I am certainly not remembering.

    Just did one this afternoon on a 700 XCR that was over 10# of trigger pull... My scale does not go that high... The sear surfaces had been poorly stoned and were badly rounded. The overtravel screw had been replaced with a non-factory unit at least twice as long as the original... I suppose that part did work...

    And there are lots of properly done trigger jobs running around, too. They stand out as unusual compared to Bubba's work though...
    art

  17. #17
    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    Default Get out the popcorn

    As the Rem 700 battle reignites and rages once more.

  18. #18
    hap
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    MTRifleman
    QUick rundown of proper technique for adjusting 700 triggers. Would be happy to discuss any aspect of the job as listed you might disagree with.

    1) Back adjustment screws out a bit
    2) turn in sear engagement until hammer falls
    3) set overtravel (turn in tight, back out 1/4 turn)
    4) Back sear engagement out 1/4-1/2 turn
    5) Recock and test trigger pull weight
    6) Adjust trigger pull weight to your desires
    7) perform safety checks
    art

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by hap View Post
    MTRifleman
    QUick rundown of proper technique for adjusting 700 triggers. Would be happy to discuss any aspect of the job as listed you might disagree with.

    1) Back adjustment screws out a bit
    2) turn in sear engagement until hammer falls
    3) set overtravel (turn in tight, back out 1/4 turn)
    4) Back sear engagement out 1/4-1/2 turn
    5) Recock and test trigger pull weight
    6) Adjust trigger pull weight to your desires
    7) perform safety checks
    art
    What I did was fairly close to this procedure, but I ended up adjusting the over travel and sear engagement screws by feel (your steps 3 & 4) and that took a little doing. One set of directions said to back the sear engagement screw out 1/2 turn after the firing pin releases when screwing it back in. That ended up with a good bit of creep so I screwed it back in until the firing pine released again and backed it out 1/4 turn. Still had some creep, so I repeated and backed out about 3/16ths, still a little creep but getting better. Repeated and back out an 1/8th and it was good.... but after fiddling with that and the over travel screw in a similar manner, my pull weight got a little heavier so I backed that out some more and repeated the whole process again with the sear and over travel screws until everything was just right. Then performed the safety tests and have repeated the safety tests several times including today. The triggers break very nicely, and in my opinion, just about as good as my Sako, if not as good.

    My S&W 1500 (Howa) breaks just as nice and all I had to do with that is adjust the pull weight screw - way easy. It came very well tuned from the factory.

    One thing I do with my triggers is to clean and flush them fairly often after a good bit of firing and bore cleaning. I always see a noticeable improvement in their performance after they are well cleaned and flushed.

  20. #20
    hap
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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    What I did was fairly close to this procedure, but I ended up adjusting the over travel and sear engagement screws by feel (your steps 3 & 4) and that took a little doing. One set of directions said to back the sear engagement screw out 1/2 turn after the firing pin releases when screwing it back in. That ended up with a good bit of creep so I screwed it back in until the firing pine released again and backed it out 1/4 turn. Still had some creep, so I repeated and backed out about 3/16ths, still a little creep but getting better. Repeated and back out an 1/8th and it was good.... but after fiddling with that and the over travel screw in a similar manner, my pull weight got a little heavier so I backed that out some more and repeated the whole process again with the sear and over travel screws until everything was just right. Then performed the safety tests and have repeated the safety tests several times including today. The triggers break very nicely, and in my opinion, just about as good as my Sako, if not as good.

    My S&W 1500 (Howa) breaks just as nice and all I had to do with that is adjust the pull weight screw - way easy. It came very well tuned from the factory.

    One thing I do with my triggers is to clean and flush them fairly often after a good bit of firing and bore cleaning. I always see a noticeable improvement in their performance after they are well cleaned and flushed.
    And 1/8 turn is not adequate sear engagement.

    There is a hole in both side plates allowing you to see the sear. Look at it with a little magnification and you will see your problem.

    The connector requires stoning, very careful, slow work... about 5 minutes maximum. I replace trigger weight springs because you cannot set them where I run mine with the .024" wire springs from the factory. Three pounds is about the lower safe limit.

    When adjusting the sear engagement you need to set it once and it should never require readjusting. If it does, stoning is the only proper way to fix it.

    Friction in the trigger group is the killer. I stone the sides of the connector and sear and ensure the guts are clean. A shot of Dri-Slide or equal is all the lubrication needed or desired. I also polish the pins in the lathe just to make them a gentle push fit. On blued pins I heat them up after polishing and hit them with Oxpho-Blue.

    I have seen bent housings, tweaked triggers and warped connectors that created too much friction to make them functional. Another common mistake involves the sear spring which rides on the overtravel screw. The spring has to go in after the overtravel screw or the spring will be buggered up by the screw when installed... I have seen it quite a few times, too.

    But back to the 1/8 turn... Calculate your sear engagement and tell us what you think of that number...
    http://www.snipercountry.com/Article...onTriggers.asp

    The link above is the best 700 trigger adjusting directions on the web, IMO&E. It does not go into cleaning up the trigger housing though... At least IIRC.

    Again, just to be sure my opinion is not missed; 1/8 turn is inadequate sear engagement and regardless of how well it passes the safety checks is not safe.
    art

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