Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Hunters first aid/emergency kit

  1. #1
    Member Knute78's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Council Grove, Kansas
    Posts
    220

    Default Hunters first aid/emergency kit

    Would like some input from everyone on what kind of first aid/emergency kit they take with them into the field. Specifically, DIY fly-in hunts. Although I don't plan on needing it, I do realize that strange things can happen, at the worst times and in the wrong places.
    Thanks,
    Knute

  2. #2
    Member Smokey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    3,334

    Default Glue

    Besides the standard items I usually toss in at least 4 little tubes of Super Glue.
    You can seal up cuts easily, and use it for many other needs. I put my buddy's thumb back together after he tried to cut in into while taking care of a caribou some years back!
    We also loaded a guy from neighboring camp wrapped in a tarp to be flown home after he stuck his femoral artery in his leg while cleaning a bou he shot. An experienced hunter as well - lived 2 days but could not reach a plane...
    The best thing to put in the kit is "Common Sense"...

  3. #3

    Thumbs up

    Good to look over old kits as well, as some of the items get dated and/or unusable.

    Often overlooked items include:
    Sams Splint
    Temp Filling/Tooth Repair Patch Kit
    Blood Clotting Agent (numerous to choose from)
    Sterile Suture Thread and Needle (tie them the same way you sew hides, baseball hitch knot)
    Pain Pills, if you have a source or leftovers
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  4. #4
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    We've been here before. I have to respectfully disagree with the previous 2 callers.

    Super glue is not a very good way to close a wound. It is very difficult to use and has a lot of dangers involved. Super glue should be left to the professionals for wound closures. Please note that you do not put super glue INSIDE of any wound!!! A thin line is put on the surface of the outer skin. The wound is pushed closed while rolling the edges of skin inward so that the outermost skin layers adhere together.

    When a wound is completely closed using super glue, there is no drainage. The wound WILL get infected because you don't have the means to clean it out properly in the field. Without drainage, the infection turns into an abscess and you end up with considerably worse tissue damage, more pain, risk of sepsis, and no way to manage that in the field.

    That said, if you use steri-strips (similar concept to a butterfly closure) to hold a wound closed, you can greatly increase the holding power of the steri-strips by tagging the outer ends (away from the wound) with super glue. And there are many other good uses. Just don't be thinking you are going to close up lacerations with glue in the field.

    Next beef is with the suturing needle and thread. BTW, we don't use "thread". The material is more like fishing line. Again there is technique to suturing that you can't just make up in the ditch somewhere. It is very easy to screw this up as well. Without a complete suturing kit, you won't be able to put the sutures in properly. And because you won't be carrying any injectable anesthetic, you won't be able to numb the wound and it will be an excruciatingly painful process to put in the sutures. And you can forget about trying to sew on yourself. That's just not happening.

    So what can you use? Well something that can quickly and easily be used to temporarily close most of a wound without significant skill or a bunch of complications. Something cheap and available to the general public. Something that can be used without anesthetic because it is quick (oh, it will still hurt, but it's kinda like pulling off a band-aid quickly). And here is your device...

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0013054515247a&type=product&cmCat=SEAR CH_all&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&Ntk=Products&QueryText=stapler&sort=a ll&N=0&Nty=1&hasJS=true&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1&_DARGS=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Fcommon%2Fsearch%2Fsearc h-box.jsp.form23

    Other than that, search around the outdoor and emergency gear boards on this forum and you'll find the answer to your question has been beat to death many times over.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  5. #5

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    We've been here before. I have to respectfully disagree with the previous 2 callers.

    Super glue is not a very good way to close a wound. It is very difficult to use and has a lot of dangers involved. Super glue should be left to the professionals for wound closures. Please note that you do not put super glue INSIDE of any wound!!! A thin line is put on the surface of the outer skin. The wound is pushed closed while rolling the edges of skin inward so that the outermost skin layers adhere together.

    When a wound is completely closed using super glue, there is no drainage. The wound WILL get infected because you don't have the means to clean it out properly in the field. Without drainage, the infection turns into an abscess and you end up with considerably worse tissue damage, more pain, risk of sepsis, and no way to manage that in the field.

    That said, if you use steri-strips (similar concept to a butterfly closure) to hold a wound closed, you can greatly increase the holding power of the steri-strips by tagging the outer ends (away from the wound) with super glue. And there are many other good uses. Just don't be thinking you are going to close up lacerations with glue in the field.

    Next beef is with the suturing needle and thread. BTW, we don't use "thread". The material is more like fishing line. Again there is technique to suturing that you can't just make up in the ditch somewhere. It is very easy to screw this up as well. Without a complete suturing kit, you won't be able to put the sutures in properly. And because you won't be carrying any injectable anesthetic, you won't be able to numb the wound and it will be an excruciatingly painful process to put in the sutures. And you can forget about trying to sew on yourself. That's just not happening.

    So what can you use? Well something that can quickly and easily be used to temporarily close most of a wound without significant skill or a bunch of complications. Something cheap and available to the general public. Something that can be used without anesthetic because it is quick (oh, it will still hurt, but it's kinda like pulling off a band-aid quickly). And here is your device...

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp?id=0013054515247a&type=product&cmCat=SEAR CH_all&returnPage=search-results1.jsp&Ntk=Products&QueryText=stapler&sort=a ll&N=0&Nty=1&hasJS=true&_dyncharset=ISO-8859-1&_DARGS=%2Fcabelas%2Fen%2Fcommon%2Fsearch%2Fsearc h-box.jsp.form23

    Other than that, search around the outdoor and emergency gear boards on this forum and you'll find the answer to your question has been beat to death many times over.
    Good call on the stapler. Never used one, but I have used the needle method. Yes it hurts, especially when you stitch yourself. If you act quickly, there is usually a short period of time when things are numb, after that ooowwweee. Perhaps a set of ear plugs in the kit wouldn't be a bad idea, now that I remember back. The best thing about it being brought up again, is it reminds us all to take a close look at what we have and ensure it is adequate and up to date.

    I suppose you'd likely dis the use of gunpowder or sulpher for cauterizing the wound too, huh.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  6. #6
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    I suppose you'd likely dis the use of gunpowder or sulpher for cauterizing the wound too, huh.
    No comment.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Fricking Texas - temporary
    Posts
    336

    Default First Aid

    I'm usually going in light weight, so my kit is not "all-inclusive", that said, it is IMO adequate until an iridium phone call is made and help arrives (never actually tested).

    KIT: Motrin 800 mg #20 (anti-inflammatory/pain releiver)
    Steri-strips for laceration closure (allows for drainage)
    duct tape on frame of pack (blister cover and band aid substitute)
    5 tabs immodium (anti-diarreal)
    5 tabs cipro (broad spectrum antibiotic)


    Hope this helps. Good luck!

  8. #8
    Member Phil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Liverpool, NY (a suburb of Syracuse)
    Posts
    494

    Default Quick Clot

    I see that Cabelas now carries Quick Clot (not the only product available). We ALWAYS have that in our emergency kit (usually near the raft). A wounded deep artery can cause irreversable damage in a short time.

    Are emergency repairs painful? You bet BUT death is a lot more permanent. And, BTW, I have used super glue to repair superficial cuts that otherwise might need a stitch or two. The steri-strips are a great idea. Loss of blood is one of the major concerns in treating a wound.

  9. #9
    Member Knute78's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Council Grove, Kansas
    Posts
    220

    Default

    Thanks for the replies. Most of what everyone has said is good advice. I will look into getting one of those staple kits. Don't plan on needing any emergency first aid, but **** happens sometimes. Most of my remote hunting has been in the Colorado Rockies, which isn't so remote that you're not but an hour or two away from qualified care. This fall though, I will be 80 miles from nowhere on a fly-in, and I just want to be prepared for the worst possible senario.
    Thanks,
    Knute

  10. #10

    Thumbs up

    Another often overlooked possiblity is taking a course in First Aid and CPR. The American Red Cross offers them in some locations. So do some of the local Fire Stations and possibly some of the hospitals, depend on where you live.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    20

    Default First Aid Training

    I agree on the First Aid/CPR Training.

    Any knucklehead can bandage a wound and do their best to keep from bleeding to death, but it's a whole other animal when trying to prevent Shock and hypothermia.

    Common Sense and a Calm demeanor can go a long ways in an emergency situation.

    Other then that.... I'd make sure you have duct tape and whatever it takes to keep warm in any conditions.

    Jake

  12. #12

    Default Video medical tips

    For season 3 of the TV show we're producing a mini-series of field medical tips that will be available on our new website (launching soon) and throughout the shows. Wilderness survival if you will. Dr. Shawn Johnston from the ASI will be the host. I'll forward this thread to him.

    If you have a topic/question in mind email me and I'll add it to the list of videos to produce. info@59thp.com
    Alaska Outdoors Television ~ Outdoor Channel

  13. #13
    Member chico99645's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    This may sound funny to some, but a few Maxi Pads and Tampons. Great for large or puncture wounds. Also some suranwrap or thin plastic sheeting with medical or duct tape for sucking chest wound. An EpiPen and roll of glucose tablets or hard candies. A EMS Field pocket guide would also be handy.

    http://www.emergencystuff.com/emsfieldguides1.html

    http://www.emergencystuff.com/9781416046981.html

  14. #14
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,443

    Default

    For you hunters taking "Quick Clot" with you, be careful using it on certain open wounds, this stuff could do more damage than good.

    On other another note, don't forget to take a "Z-pac" ....nothing worse than getting pneumonia or flu like symtoms while hunting in the back country, even if you don't get sick, your partner might, and I wouldn't want anyone to slow me down, or end my hunt on that note.

  15. #15
    Member Phil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Liverpool, NY (a suburb of Syracuse)
    Posts
    494

    Default Quick clot

    Since I think I'm the one who suggested this product, I will say that our supply is now over 10 years old and hasn't been used (and, yes, it needs to be replaced).

    This product is to be used ONLY in a matter of "life or death" - not for ordinary wounds (even bad ones).

    I second all the other suggestions including taking some hard candies. One of my hunting buddies (a resident) woke me at 5 am when he was trying to stuff his boot in a small stove so he could get some heat. Not much fun. After forcing him to eat some candy and watching him sleep for 2 hours, the emergency was over but - it was no fun at the time.

    BTW, I always carry duct tape also.

  16. #16
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Thumbs up TQ

    Tourniquets. Don't let the Red Cross 1st aid knuckleheads tell you that tourniquets are only a "last resort" after you've wasted precious time and blood screwing around with everything else. Accidental gunshot wound to an extremity... tourniquet first, then deal with wound management. Bear mauling... kill the bear, put on tourniquet, and then deal with wound management. If the blood is pouring out, the single most important thing to do is stop that right now. After you've managed the wound, you reevaluate the need for the tourniquet.

    Buy a built-for-purpose, commercial tourniquet. Inventing a tourniquet in the field from sticks and t-shirts is nothing but wasted time. If you need a tourniquet, you need it right now. Open package, apply, tighten just to the point where bleeding stops, and then move on to wound managment.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Tourniquets. Don't let the Red Cross 1st aid knuckleheads tell you that tourniquets are only a "last resort" after you've wasted precious time and blood screwing around with everything else. Accidental gunshot wound to an extremity... tourniquet first, then deal with wound management. Bear mauling... kill the bear, put on tourniquet, and then deal with wound management. If the blood is pouring out, the single most important thing to do is stop that right now. After you've managed the wound, you reevaluate the need for the tourniquet.

    Buy a built-for-purpose, commercial tourniquet. Inventing a tourniquet in the field from sticks and t-shirts is nothing but wasted time. If you need a tourniquet, you need it right now. Open package, apply, tighten just to the point where bleeding stops, and then move on to wound managment.
    If you ever have to put a tourniquet one someone else, always mark the patients forehead with a T, using blood, charcoal or anything else you can find to enscribe it where it is legible. Especially the case, if you have to leave it on someone that is being evaced out or left as you walk out for help. That way the medical personnel know to relieve it now and then and do what they can, to save the extremity.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •