Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: range report 350 remington mag

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, Ak
    Posts
    3,908

    Default range report 350 remington mag

    For those of you that owe a 350 rem mag. Ruger 77, 22 in barrel 2x7 leupold. Load CCI 250, R-P brass once fired, 55.0gr of RL-15, 250gr Hornady spire point bullet. Excellent load pulled it out of the Nosler manual this max according to Nosler. But it looks like I found a my bear/moose load all bullets were touching each other.

  2. #2

    Default

    I've never been able to group better than 2" with my rifle, but then again I just recently started reloading for it and factory ammo definitely leaves something to be desired. I tried reloading some Barnes TSX 225 Gr, but the overall bullet length is longer than listed in any manual and they barely feed in my gun.

    I used 200 primers in mine. What made you go with the magnum rifle primers?

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, Ak
    Posts
    3,908

    Default

    With these 250gr bullets I have to seat the bullet past the canelure. No big deal I don't get all hung up on the OAL as a matter of fact I don't pay attention what the manual says. So seat them until they fit in your magazine then go shoot them and have fun... I always use magnum primers because of where we are at Alaska...

  4. #4

    Default

    Well I still don't trust myself completely to correctly read all of the pressure signs and I have an uncle who many years ago blew the action apart on an old shotgun he was reloading for and almost lost his hand. I know the Ruger is a lot stronger than his old shotgun, but I still don't wanna take any chances with overpressring things. I've seen what gas pressure is capable of doing in my line of work and this is no different. I guess maybe I'm too cautious.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, Ak
    Posts
    3,908

    Default

    Well nothing wrong with being to cautious I guess. As long as you are not going over max loads listed in the manual you should be good heck you will be good. Just don't get all hung up on the OAL which it seems you are it is just a recommendation of the max OAL. But if you are all hung up on the OAL length probabyl should find some 225gr Nosler partitions or Speer grand slams they tend be shorter than the Barnes bullet, due to the Barnes being pure copper....

  6. #6

    Default

    Ya maybe. The 200 gr Barnes are shorter than the 225s so I might try them. I'm just a big fan of the Barnes and if I can get them to shoot well in my rifle I will be using them. I've seen first hand what Barnes bullets will do and I'm pretty sold on them........provided my rifle will shoot them.

  7. #7
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 323 View Post
    Well nothing wrong with being to cautious I guess. As long as you are not going over max loads listed in the manual you should be good heck you will be good. Just don't get all hung up on the OAL which it seems you are it is just a recommendation of the max OAL. But if you are all hung up on the OAL length probabyl should find some 225gr Nosler partitions or Speer grand slams they tend be shorter than the Barnes bullet, due to the Barnes being pure copper....
    Don't want to bring out the flame thrower or anything, but you might want to do some reading... The max charge listed in manuals are max loads based on the rifle they used to work up loads.

    Ignoring COAL is also a BAD idea. If your reloads are too long, when you chamber a round and the bullet is forced into the lands it compresses the powder and can cause high pressure. Think of it like this, drive your car against a curb, if you have your wheels against the curb it takes a lot of throttle to drive over the curb, now if you have just a few inches of roll, it takes much less power.

    Determine what bullet you want to load for.
    Start at the recommended starting charge and load one each round in half grain increments until you have loaded to the recommend max charge.

    Go to the range and fire these rounds. Aim at the same spot and mark each round so you know the powder charge.

    A sure sign of high pressure is a bolt that is hard to lift and marks on the brass from the bolt head. If while firing your loads you have a stiff bolt, stop there and consider the last load that extracted correctly as your rifles max.

    Using one target for each load work up. After firing these rounds you should have some close together. We are looking for a pattern and we want to rule out extreme powder differences. Using the grouping and velocity as a guide you should be able to find a range to load for.

    Load 2 sets of 3 rounds each in your chosen powder ranges and now fire these and test for groups.

    We talk about load development more in these two threads.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=76096
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=74433

    Be safe and shoot straight.

    Steve

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, Ak
    Posts
    3,908

    Default Well

    I will say this most reloading manuals are on the conservative side. Thier is no way anyone is going to blow up a gun with todays manual becuase they are so conservative. The only way you are going to blow up a gun is if you dump 60 grain of pistol powder in case and pull the trigger you will have a bad day. Anyone with an ounce of common sense should know if you can't close the bolt because the bullet is in the lands, then seat it some more so it will close. What I'm talking about has nothing to do with a bullet in the rifling. In my case I had to seat the bullets so I could get them in the magazine. Nowhere did I say I was seating the bullets past max OAL.

  9. #9

    Default

    I checked the max OAL in my rifle and to touch the lands I would have to seat the bullet so far out that the bullet wouldn't even extract from the chamber so I'm not too concerned with being too long, it's the being too short I'm worried about. My concern is that if I seat a bullet too deep (past the last cannelure on the bullet), that it would create too much pressure. I loaded mine with 55Gr of 4064 (middle of the road for what the manual lists) and showed no signs of high pressure, but I still wonder. I have consulted others on it and it seems that I am ok.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Wasilla, Ak
    Posts
    3,908

    Default

    You will have nothing to worry about.. I have a Savage 99 in a 284 winchester. I have to seat the bullets way past the cannelures to get them to fit in the magazine it is the 99C so it has the clip. I use 160gr bullets in it.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •