Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: hunting traditions, what do you pass on?

  1. #1
    Member hooternanny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Interior, AK
    Posts
    404

    Arrow hunting traditions, what do you pass on?

    In hunting camps people often form traditons, customs or general things that are done with a symbolic meaning. Same as a first car for a new driver, a first date, first beer, first buck, ect. In reference to that -what do you do in your hunting camp traditonally or that you consider a right of passage?

    For example, the last load of meat hauled out of the field being the rack or trophy portion of the harvest -must be carried out by the person who shot the animal. That is one of mine. It shows you earned the animal, you deserve the trophy if you can get that huge rack (sometimes quite heavy) out of the forest. Your already exhausted and it's something you'll never forget, so we make it memoriable.

    Another is the new guy in camp some how always goes home and ends up discovering he got something extra. When he opens one of his game bags he will realize that part of his portion of the meat included evidence of sex attached. A couple of comments made before hand will start to sink in and lets just say we have fun with that.

    Do you have any traditions that you will share? Funny ones? Serious ones? What do they mean? or is no explaination necessary!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Member Phil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Liverpool, NY (a suburb of Syracuse)
    Posts
    494

    Default No Explanation Needed

    Alsong with hunting Alaska on a regular basis, I always (since 1991) hunt pronghorns & mule deer in Wyoming. The restaurant that we frequent serves sliced "Rocky Mt. oysters". If you have to ask what those are, you probably won't understand this.

    Many of our friends are doing their first hunt west of the Mississippi and we always make sure to order a serving of "bull chips". It's our tradition to make sure first time hunters "enjoy" at least a bite of the bull chips.

    That's the only tradition that I participate in. As far as eastern hunting - I come from a non-hunting family so there are no "long term traditions" to hand down. AND - that's unfortunate.

  3. #3
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    My family had a long standing tradition of going home empty handed. It seems to skip around in the family somewhat though. My dad followed the tradition religiously and I do not, my uncle was adamantly against it. Of his 2 boys one is a strong upholder of this tradition and the other is not. I have 3 sons so we will see how this gets passed down...

  4. #4
    Member B&C 04's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    South for Now
    Posts
    436

    Post

    I think the most important tradition that has been uphld in my family is the ol' blood strips under the eyes after your first kill, never mattered the age of the hunter. Happened to me when I got my first Mulie back home in North Dakota and I really thought that a tradition like that was stupid at that time but growing up and now having my 10 yr old son go through the same steps it really brings back alot of memories and makes us appreciate what we have accomplished and our future goals..

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,085

    Talking Heh heh

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    My family had a long standing tradition of going home empty handed. It seems to skip around in the family somewhat though. My dad followed the tradition religiously and I do not, my uncle was adamantly against it. Of his 2 boys one is a strong upholder of this tradition and the other is not. I have 3 sons so we will see how this gets passed down...
    I wish there were more families with your tradition! lol Leaves more for everybody else.
    An opinion should be the result of thought, not a substitute for it.
    - Jef Mallett

  6. #6
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak, AK.
    Posts
    1,527

    Default

    Probably not what your looking for, but kind of a tradition. My grandfather took me hunting for my first time at the age of 5. We went in the back yard in the middle of the night and went snipe hunting. I took my son on his first hunt last winter when he was also 5. We also went into the back yard snipe hunting. No one in my family has ever killed a snipe, but we keep trying.

  7. #7
    Member akguy454's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    norh pole AK
    Posts
    228

    Default snipe

    both my girls have sat in the woods with a bag and making the traditional "ka-ka, ka-ka" mating sounds and still have not got one yet.....elusive little buggers ain't they

  8. #8
    Member akguy454's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    norh pole AK
    Posts
    228

    Default rope trick

    any time I am with a youngster at camp, in order to pass time and enjoyment I tie a rope to one leg and opposite wrist with a knot in the middle and tell them to untie it. It can be done relatively easily but they put themselves in a knot first. Oh and of course the rope is a wee bit shorter than they would like it to be. After they figure out how to do it they get the right to play it on the next person in camp.

  9. #9
    Member aksheephuntress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    seward,ak
    Posts
    431

    Thumbs up

    ...Great thread!

    -We always save a package of sheep meat for the "last supper" just prior to the next year's sheep season opener.......


    -and if we get fortunate and harvest.... we eat the heart and ribs that night, or the next, in camp-
    ....a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed....

  10. #10
    Member RC23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    202

    Default

    #1. Penis is hung in a tree; never thrown on the ground.
    #2. First kill; the hunter eats the tip of the heart on the spot.
    More to come; give me a few minutes.

  11. #11
    Member RC23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    202

    Default

    #3. Don't drink til dark.
    #4. Always put your left boot on first.

  12. #12
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    Had my boy in camp when he was a youngster.

    He was a real tropper of eating the heart fried in butter, lol. ( That was a must)

    The other thing he like'ed was trapping the Jay's with a milk crate. He would catch them, and then they would fly out the handhold's. He would sit there for hour's catching them. At 6 year's old, it was fun to watch, and tell him, It's O.K. you'll get him next time. About that same time he would do some fishing for grayling, but the salmon were in the river, so when a grayling went for his lure he would jerk it away because he wanted the big fish.

    Kid's are fun in the camp.

  13. #13
    Member highestview's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Haines
    Posts
    1,308

    Default Everybody does this

    You forgot the tradition that we all do.

    1. Forget something REALLY important.
    2. Blame somebody nearby.
    3. Improvise something stupid.
    4. Get even angrier about the results.
    5. Get in a screaming match.
    6. Cool off, make ammends.
    7. Sooner or later, someone says "Man, its just so amazing to be out here. People from out of state pay tens of thousands of dollars just to come look at this scenery that we just drive by. We're so lucky."
    8. Everybody gets all introspective and quiet for a minute.
    9. Someone always says "Well, this problem will work itself out.", (which it always does) and then says "Lets get back to hunting."
    10. Hunting continues as normal.

    Then we repeat steps 1-6 until the meat is on the grill back home.

    Each time, every time, no exceptions.

  14. #14
    Member aksheephuntress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    seward,ak
    Posts
    431

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    You forgot the tradition that we all do.

    1. Forget something REALLY important.
    2. Blame somebody nearby.
    3. Improvise something stupid.
    4. Get even angrier about the results.
    5. Get in a screaming match.
    6. Cool off, make ammends.
    7. Sooner or later, someone says "Man, its just so amazing to be out here. People from out of state pay tens of thousands of dollars just to come look at this scenery that we just drive by. We're so lucky."
    8. Everybody gets all introspective and quiet for a minute.
    9. Someone always says "Well, this problem will work itself out.", (which it always does) and then says "Lets get back to hunting."
    10. Hunting continues as normal.

    Then we repeat steps 1-6 until the meat is on the grill back home.

    Each time, every time, no exceptions.

    ....that's hillarious!
    -I've actually seen this happen on hunts, a couple of times...just like this!!-lol-
    ....a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed....

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,637

    Default

    I teach them to be efficent, and do the most with what they have.

    One main idea is to always come home with a full sled.
    Often that means I get to overnight.
    Meat is usually the main load Im after, or fish if thts what Im after, but should neither work out, and I have no cargo, its about an hours ax work to get a few logs for the stove or ice for drinking water.

    Another is to be wize with the shells.

    A "Fouling shot"/sights/action test is acceptable, after were outta town, and especially when its very cold out, your string can start with a flyer on the first shot, but shooting up the country side is a no-no.
    Plinking when we have a fresh batch of ammo or sighting in a new gun is very acceptable, and getting to know a rifle in a 100 or so rounds is fun anyway.
    We often buy bulk ammo, and practise can be extensive.

    Might add that a quick follow up shot is something I teach them as well, although we strive for one shot kills, and even if its definitly gushing mortal, if its standing, 2 can do just fine.

    Keep you knife sharp.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  16. #16
    B.C.Hunter
    Guest

    Default

    when hunting around home, we would all stop at my house and Mom would fry bacon and eggs for everyone! Mom moved to a bigger town so I guess I'll have to cook for my boys cause my wife doesn't do breakfast!!

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    FAI
    Posts
    2,294

    Default The Next Door Neighbor

    These are traditions started by my neighbor who is like my father. He took me on my first successful moose hunt in 1980 and I still get to hunt with him to this day. It will indeed be a sad day when he no longer goes to moose camp.
    Ray had 2 sons of his own that he took hunting. He gave them both Buck 110 Hunter knives. I was the 3rd "son". When he took me moose hunting I got the 3rd Buck. He ended up with 3 grandsons and a granddaughter that hunt and they each got the same knife.
    My Son and daughter came along later, and he treated them just like his own. So Grandpa came up with 2 more knives, a 110 hunter for Labman, and since I knew my daughter would have smaller hands, he changed things a bit and got her a Buck 112.
    There is one knife in my box that will never get sold. Care to guess which one?
    Every year we drive to the Yukon bridge to run downriver to hunt moose. There is always the same food in each truck. He buys Kentucky fried chicken, a bag of locally grown carrots, and his wonderful wife bakes the best chocolate chip cookies you can imagine. (every time we stop on the drive or long river ride I try to get in to the other cookie boxes so mine lasts longer, guess that is tradition too)
    The camp meals are a tradition unto themselves. Every year there are 2 special meals we look forward to. One is Eleanor's homemade stew that we froze and reheat once we get to camp and set the wall tent up. It is normally the first meal in moose camp. The second is Champagne Chicken, mashed potatoes w/ gravy, and corn. The chicken is seared in Brandy and simmered in Champagne.
    There are many more traditions in moose camp from the way we build our meat poles to the meat bags my wife sews and to the prayers we say at meals.
    This is a great thread, thanks for the idea,
    ARR

  18. #18
    Member AAA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    22

    Default

    My great grandfather started a tradition that has been passed down through every generation down to me.. As soon as you come up on a downed animal, you first, check to make sure it's dead. Then second, you kneel down and say a prayer of thanks to the Creator, our Father in Heaven.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •