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Thread: Kenai/Homer/Soldotna in July need LOTS of info

  1. #1

    Default Kenai/Homer/Soldotna in July need LOTS of info

    My family is planning a trip in July (19-27) of 2010 to go fishing in the following areas;

    Lower Kenai river
    Kenai Lake
    Russian River

    (There's a few other spots that were recommended to us but we will be around the general area of Anchorage, Kenai, Soldotna, Homer)

    We are doing a self-guided trip... flying into Anchorage, renting a motor home and driving from location to location, fishing along the way. A friend of mine used to live and guide in Kenai, AK about 10 years ago and has given us good information for our trip. He's given us some good info, but I come seeking more. I'm a little unsure how much it's changed from 10 years ago.

    Id like to get more info on;

    * species of fish in each river/lake/stream we will be on.
    * the type of lures, bait, flies to use for each species & river/lake/stream

    We are not really set on catching any particular species of fish, just as long as were catching fish!!! We are focused on Kings, Pinks, Silver, Rainbows, Chum(???), for the most part.

    Any of you who have any good information to share would be great.

    Thanks,

    Mark

  2. #2
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Might be a few Red Salmon to be found in the Russian. The others I don't know much about.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  3. #3
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Pinks - Take a side detour to Hope near the end of your trip. Fresh pinks should be hitting after the 20th, and they're relatively easy to catch on pixies, spinners, or most any brightly colored fly.

    Silvers - Your only real option will be to take a charter out of Seward. The fishing can be great, but they're not generally accessible from shore in July.

    Kings - Again, a charter will be your best bet. Check out the Kasilof for less crowded, potentially more productive fishing. The Kenai produces bigger fish, but is more crowded and generally less productive per rod hour.

    Chum - Your best bets for chum salmon would be to drive north of Anchorage and fish Willow Creek, Montana Creek, or the other creeks in the area. They're hard fighting fish, but not as good eating as kings, silvers, and reds in the opinion of most.

    Red (Sockeye) - You'll be here for the start of the 2nd run on the Kenai and Russian Rivers. If you want to get your family into fish, this should be your first priority species. They're also arguably the best eating of the five. Go to the Russian and park at the trailhead parking lot. Walk the 3 miles upriver to the falls, then back down 600 yards to the legal fishing area. Spend the day walking down the river and fishing along the way. You will use coho flies, otherwise known as Russian River flies. Spend time watching others fish, as that will show you how it's done. Also read some of the threads here on techniques for fishing for reds. They usually don't "bite", so technique is very important to increase your legal hook-up rate. You can also do well on sockeye by fishing the Kenai itself.

    Kenai Lake is pretty, but there's not really any fishing to be done in the lake itself.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Pinks - Take a side detour to Hope near the end of your trip. Fresh pinks should be hitting after the 20th, and they're relatively easy to catch on pixies, spinners, or most any brightly colored fly.

    Silvers - Your only real option will be to take a charter out of Seward. The fishing can be great, but they're not generally accessible from shore in July.

    Kings - Again, a charter will be your best bet. Check out the Kasilof for less crowded, potentially more productive fishing. The Kenai produces bigger fish, but is more crowded and generally less productive per rod hour.

    Chum - Your best bets for chum salmon would be to drive north of Anchorage and fish Willow Creek, Montana Creek, or the other creeks in the area. They're hard fighting fish, but not as good eating as kings, silvers, and reds in the opinion of most.

    Red (Sockeye) - You'll be here for the start of the 2nd run on the Kenai and Russian Rivers. If you want to get your family into fish, this should be your first priority species. They're also arguably the best eating of the five. Go to the Russian and park at the trailhead parking lot. Walk the 3 miles upriver to the falls, then back down 600 yards to the legal fishing area. Spend the day walking down the river and fishing along the way. You will use coho flies, otherwise known as Russian River flies. Spend time watching others fish, as that will show you how it's done. Also read some of the threads here on techniques for fishing for reds. They usually don't "bite", so technique is very important to increase your legal hook-up rate. You can also do well on sockeye by fishing the Kenai itself.

    Kenai Lake is pretty, but there's not really any fishing to be done in the lake itself.
    If you are going to fish the Russian bring bear spray or a firearm with you. Another good investment would be polarized sunglasses for you and your family. This will take the glare of the water and help you see the fish when trying to drift your fly in their mouths. As far as the areas you are going to, pick up a copy of "The Highway Angler" or "Alaska's Guide to Flyfishing". One of these books should help you on your RV adventure. They will tell you what species to expect and what dates they will be there for most of the waters you will encounter. They will also help you with techniques and tackle selection. Good Luck

  5. #5

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    Make sure to acquaint yourself with the rules and regulations of each body of water you plan on fishing. In one place bait is allowed and in another it's not. Some places it's single hook only and in another it's legal to use treble hooks. The list goes on and on.

    Lots of rules and I'm sure a few of them have changed since your friend was last here.

  6. #6
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Get Gunnar Pederson's book, "Fishing the Kenai" (or similar). Great book.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  7. #7
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Also, put a copy of the "Milepost" on the center console.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Mile post is good, did you get your RV yet? Great Alaskan Holiday RV is the best. I fish for sockeye the most near the Russian river and a few other spots with less people. Finding a good spot to fish is one thing but knowing how to catch them is another. My first trip in 05 it took a few days to learn how to floss but after you get the hang of it , it is easy to get your limit. If this is your first trip I would recommend a Halibut trip, but if you go out of Seward don't use Saltwater Safari they ripped me off last summer.

    Send me a message and I will help you out more if you need it. I am not an expert on Alaska but I know how to catch fish and I can cut down the learning curve for you.

    tight Lines
    Scott

  9. #9

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    Some good books should get it done. Agree with an earlier post on suggested titles, especially Highway Angler and Alaska Roadside Anglers Guide. Fishing Alaska's Kenai Peninsula is also good. The first one is good for finding some out of the way spots, the other for detailed stuff on the more popular spots. Cant go wrong with those.

  10. #10

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    I dont really have anything say that hasn't already been covered on the fishing aspect of your trip. But I would like to warn you that even though you will be up here in July. Bring cloths for fall weather. Even thermal underwear. It can get real cold out there on those halibut boats. And it will most likely dip into the low 30's at least sometime while you are there at night.
    I usually fish the Russian River for the first running of the Reds, in late June. And I always go about 4 in the morning to try and beat the crowds. And I have got ice in my guides more than once.
    One thing on the fishing aspect. If you go to the confluence of the Kenai and Russian rivers to fish for Reds. I have always prefered to fish the Russian River. It runs clear, and is easy to spot the fish. The Kenai runs cloudy and you are left to fishing blind for them. Plus the Russian is easy to wade.
    If you cant spot any fish, then walk down to the confluence. The fish seem to like to pile up down there. But then, so do the people.

  11. #11

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    All good bits of information. I'm mainly researching what types of flies/bait/spinners to use. I spent this entire week browsing thru over 200 posts and got some good info. I will check on some of those books. The Milepost was a recommendation so we've ordered the 2010 version and waiting for it to arrive.

    Yes, We reserved our RV last week, through Great American RV. We called and checked on at least a dozen and they had the best deal and what hopefully is great customer service. Booked our airline tickets last week as well. Just marking days off the calendar now.

    I also called the AK F&G folks and they are going to send me a packet of information once the 2010 regs get printed out. So reading them up and down and making sure they are with me at all times wont be an issue. Def not there to ruin things for other people or take advantage... I've always been a responsible outdoors man.

    Im sure I will be back with questions... thanks for all the input thus far. Keep it comming.

  12. #12

    Default Kenai/Homer/Soldotna

    We have rented from Great Alaskan for the past two years and had very good experiences. I would support the suggestion of fishing for pinks in Resurrection Creek at Hope. There is a small campground and the fishing is fun fun fun especially for less experienced anglers. Small pink leadheaded jigs worked great for a fish nearly every cast. You may want to consider a drift fishing day on the upper Kenai. My experience (while very limited) is that near roadside access sites you can experience true alaskan combat fishing at its worst.

  13. #13
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    Default On the road...

    You are on it a lot.

    If it is dreary, and it can be, bring amber (yellow) sunglasses to brighten up your driving days.

    Your Alaskan trip is not just about fish, it is also about your care, comfort, and attentiveness.

    Yellow helps, believe me...

    Rosenberg/Florida
    "Two decades researching and defining fishing opportunities in the Last Frontier!"


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