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Thread: Outboard motors?

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    Default Outboard motors?

    Hi again, now that i know i dont have to worry about paying extra duties for twin outboards(US bought then into Canada) not made in the NAFTA countries, that opens up all brands! SO, what would YOU go with if given the choice?...this is for a 29 foot pilot house type boat...what "I" would like at this point is twin 4-stroke, 175 HP Yammys, but they dont make that, so either stay with the 150's or move up to 200 hp!..other brands make the 175, so, is there any real difference nowadays?...i hear, honda/merc/susuki are all good, i have a 60/40 4 stroke jet merc with is great....But, i have had issues with my old 95 15 hp evinrude but it allways got me home--and that is 15 years old!!!...so, what do y'all think?...thanks larry

  2. #2
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Honestly, I do not think you can go wrong with any of them. I would be most concerned with the dealer support after the sale. Which make offers the best service in your area? That would be my choice.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Hmmmmmm.?......175+175=350.........
    Why not 1 motor?
    “Nothing worth doing is easy”
    TR

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    Default Just a reminder

    what ever you get remember that wiring harness and controls are not genaric but product spicific and even horse power can change them as well . I would personally stay with OMC they have the most consistant wiring and contol systems , suseys tend t be flakey and exteemly inconsistant in their wiring ,bad for future repairs. Yamaha has a good product but sourcing perts and trained people to service them might be lacking as you venture away from familliar teritory.
    Hondas are generaly good but tend to be heavy . I'm not sure if thy have finished evolving their technology, which means parts differ a lot from one model to the next. I always keep field service in mind, especially when your life could be depending on it . Availability of parts and special tools required to do service and repairs. I never buy a motor with out a repair manual , and I am not talking the general pamflit they package with the motor. How hard is the starter to replace and where is the spaire.
    if you've had the boat a while up grade your battery cables and switches .If your are in salt, check your annodes.
    Just food for thought

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    Why not 1 motor?
    yep, that 350 would be nice, but the idea of having another outboard which will "plane" me home sells me, plus i gain the two prop manouverability!.....i think if i stayed in a busy area i would go the 350 but, plan for some far away adventures....but, sh$t still breaks down, and bad gas is bad gas!!....larry

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arleigh View Post
    what ever you get remember that wiring harness and controls are not genaric but product spicific and even horse power can change them as well . I would personally stay with OMC they have the most consistant wiring and contol systems , suseys tend t be flakey and exteemly inconsistant in their wiring ,bad for future repairs. Yamaha has a good product but sourcing perts and trained people to service them might be lacking as you venture away from familliar teritory.
    Hondas are generaly good but tend to be heavy . I'm not sure if thy have finished evolving their technology, which means parts differ a lot from one model to the next. I always keep field service in mind, especially when your life could be depending on it . Availability of parts and special tools required to do service and repairs. I never buy a motor with out a repair manual , and I am not talking the general pamflit they package with the motor. How hard is the starter to replace and where is the spaire.
    if you've had the boat a while up grade your battery cables and switches .If your are in salt, check your annodes.
    Just food for thought

    yep, what ever i get all Three will be the same...twins and kicker!..thanks for the ideas....i dont hear to much about honda and susuki in my neck of the woods..so, it will prob be yammy(150's) or the merc!..lary

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    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcriverhunter View Post
    yep, that 350 would be nice, but the idea of having another outboard which will "plane" me home sells me, plus i gain the two prop manouverability!.....i think if i stayed in a busy area i would go the 350 but, plan for some far away adventures....but, sh$t still breaks down, and bad gas is bad gas!!....larry

    I would make sure 100% with a guarantee that you can get up with one engine before going twins. I personally got roped into that one and found out the hard way that I can't get on step with a one engine. Now I got two motors and one is a really big kicker that sucks gas. If I would be able go back to motor choice, I would have a single 225 with a high thrust kicker instead of twin 115's

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Larry,

    I will chime in here as well, even though it sounds like you have already made your decision. I was really on the fence about twins, but so far I am happy with one motor (knock on wood), especially when doing winter maintenance! Look at the list of things you have to do each year, and multiply it by two. Also look at the additional fuel consumption you will see with two motors vs. one, and this ends up being really expensive insurance policy. As others have said, being able to plane on one motor is the big potential benefit, but if you go this route you will be overpowered for day to day operations – but that is way better than being under powered. The other thing to consider with one motor and getting on step is you should be able to do it without changing props. I would think the last thing you want to do when you are way out is risk dropping something in the water on your one working motor. Also, make sure that when you are running just one motor, you are within the allowable RPM range. Lugging a bit motor is very hard on them.

    One of the things I may eventually do with mine is get an autopilot on the kicker. This way if you have to come back at 5kts, you can relax and enjoy the ride. There are plenty of boats traveling this speed every day. They are called sailboats and these guys seem to survive just fine. One more point before I shut up. Another clue can be had by looking up market a ways. Look at something like a Nordhavn (www.norhavn.com). These are $1M-$5M boats designed to cross oceans, and by far the vast majority of them are produced with a single main motor, and as an option they usually have a secondary wing motor, or go home motor. These secondary motor are usually around 30hp for a 40-60 ft boat.

    I think where twins really pay off is at resale time, since most people seem to find this really important.
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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    If you want twin 175's, suzuki makes them, and they are good engines.

    There are pros and cons of twins, but I understand where you are coming from because if/when I build my next boat, which will be a 28 footer, it'll have twin 175's. It's just a piece of mind thing, but I like to go far from port and AK waters aren't swarming with tow services and early and late season there aren't that many boats out there. Some of our ports can have very strong cross winds, so the manuverability of twins is a plus. Also to get the greatest reliability from twins, make sure you don't have any single points of failure on the electrical or fuel system. I.e. wire them independently and isoloated from one another, and have seperate fuel pickups, lines and filters.

    If you are looking at an aluminum 29' boat, I really don't think a 175 will be enough to get you on plane. A 175 will plane a gross weight of 7000#, and I think you'll find a 29' aluminum boat with fuel, gear and crew is going to be in the 10,000# range and hence with the recomendation of a max of 40#/hp you'll want to go with twin 250's.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    If you are looking at an aluminum 29' boat, I really don't think a 175 will be enough to get you on plane. A 175 will plane a gross weight of 7000#, and I think you'll find a 29' aluminum boat with fuel, gear and crew is going to be in the 10,000# range and hence with the recomendation of a max of 40#/hp you'll want to go with twin 250's.
    Hi paul, the boat i am looking at at this time is the 29' wooldridge pilot house....they are planing on 1 150 hp with 1200# of gear(or at least thats what the test results are)..even so i think the boat loades if about 8000# with the 150 gallon tank! but this is just a guess..

    anyhow, i have been lookin at this yammy
    http://www.yamaha-motor.com/outboard...103/specs.aspx

    a pair of these babies would only be about 100 pounds more than the 150 4 strkes(again just a quick est).....but, not sure what they cost, or what the $$$ at the pump will be!..pretty sure planing on one engine would not be an issue!.....

    This single/twin debate,i think is one of those things in life, where---THERE IS NO ONE RIGHT ANSWER, and i think either would be great!...but, at this point it will be TWINS..thanks for all the input! larry

  11. #11
    Member polardds's Avatar
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    Default Weight to HP

    After purchase service is a biggy as Spoiled stated, but also look at what your weight to hp ratio is. If you can go bigger with the same weight do it. See how the boat floats with the bigger engines if you can. Allot of these boats today are still based of two stroke motor weight designs so when you put two big four strokes back there they sit a little low in the stern.

    I personally twins. I wish I had twin gas tanks though. Two big motors with the same bad gas is not going to do me any good.

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    Default Suzuki

    Go Suzuki, power to weight ratio is the best of all manufactures. Reliabilty is second to none, hence there unmatched promotional none declining warranty. I would go with a single and a kicker. if you like twins Suzuki's 175 are awsome, but then again there 300 is 200 lbs lighter then yamaha's.

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntcoastie View Post
    but then again there 300 is 200 lbs lighter then yamaha's.
    Not any more. The redesigned F300 is about 5o pounds lighter and more efficient (according to yamaha's tests) than the DF300. I have not heard many negatives about the suzuki line, but I think that yamaha really stepped up to the plate with these new V-6s.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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