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Thread: A possible set up for Silver/King Salmon...Your opinion?

  1. #1
    Member AlaskaIsCold's Avatar
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    Arrow A possible set up for Silver/King Salmon...Your opinion?

    So year earlier I wrote a post about owning a 4wt and 8wt fly rod, but I decided to give my 8wt to my friend since he really only goes after silvers, he doesn't like the crowds that the king salmon bring.

    So Ive figured out what I was going to get as my new set up and I wanted to run it by you guys, I figure that the more input I get the more info ill know and maybe change my decision.

    Reel: Okuma Helios 8/9
    Rod: TFO Lefty Kreh Professional Series Fly Rod 9wt
    Backing: Dacron - White 30# 100Yd
    Line: Scientific Angler Professional Series - Full Sinking - Type VI - WF9S
    Leader: Scientific Angler Fluorocarbon Leader 9' Freshwater/Saltwater 20#

    So yeah! Tell me what you guys think, or what you think would be a greater substitute! I'm thinking that with this set up I can handle King salmon in the parks highway system and ship creek area As well as silvers in general. Also, a second question is there any place where you can catch and release Kings using barbless flies? Or once you catch your king for the day you cant fish at all?
    A bad day fishing is still better than a good day at work.

  2. #2

    Default my opinion

    For the parks I see two possible problems.

    1. A 9 wt may be a little light. Fishing the parks means lots of people and/or small stream conditions. This in turn means that you are going to want a big stick to be able to turn and manage your fish before it runs over other people's lines or down stream. I feel that especially on the parks once a king runs out of the pool that you are fishing you are going to have a very hard time landing it. It is for this reason that I would either commit to kings or silvers on the fly for this season; really learn that species, and then next year when you can afford it take a step up and get a new rod. I've said this before but I would really look into St. Croix rods. Best warranty in the business and if you decide you want/can afford a better model next year you can send in your damaged or undamaged rod and get 90-95% of the original cost toward a new rod. I'd look at picking up a quality 8wt for silvers or a 10/11 for kings and use a gear rod for the other species for this year if cost is an issue.

    2. Full sinking line. Most streams on the parks will have fishable holes that are not that deep. In almost every situation you will be able to using a WF floating line. This line is much more versatile and with split shot and leader length you will be able to dredge most of the holes you will be fishing. You may want to think about an intermediate sink tip but in my experience a full sink may be a little much and may limit your options as to which pools you can effectively fish.

    I picked up the versi-tip system from Rio for my 8wt. This is a floating line that comes with 5 different heads that range from full float to fast sink. It is $130 bucks from alaskaflyfishinggoods but worth it if you feel you will be encountering varied stream conditions. For larger rods I also like to overline them by one. So i'd get a 10wt line for a 9wt rod.

  3. #3
    Member neverborn's Avatar
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    Default

    Reel: Okuma Helios 8/9 OK
    Rod: TFO Lefty Kreh Professional Series Fly Rod 9wt OK
    Backing: Dacron - White 30# 100Yd OK
    Line: Scientific Angler Professional Series - Full Sinking - Type VI - WF9S
    Wrong !!!
    Leader: Scientific Angler Fluorocarbon Leader 9' Freshwater/Saltwater 20# OK

    better = shooting heads (floating) + Sink-tips ( intermediate, T-8, T-15 ) = versi-tips system
    shooting head system is a good way to address varied water conditions

    more info
    http://globalflyfisher.com/fishbetter/shootingheads/
    http://www.deneki.com/alaskawest/wor...g/king-salmon/

  4. #4
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Default

    With the exception of the full sink line, I think everything you've listed will work just fine for your intended purposes. True, a 10/11 might serve you a bit better in combat situations, but I think you can get by with a 9 and it'll be a much more practical rod to use for silvers and reds on the Russian or Kenai as well. Up your leader size a bit and it'll turn (most) kings well enough.

    The benefit of the shooting head/versi-tip system as mentioned is that you can use the interchangeable sink tips to cover different water situations.

    Keep in mind that shooting heads are designed just for that... shooting... and making long casts. Typically they're 30' and you attach a running line (amensia, braided mono, Rio slickshooter, etc.) behind them. Some, such as the Rio versi-tip, have a built in running line attached to the back of th shooting head. Honestly, for the streams you're going to be fishing you're not going to be making a ton of long casts. The real popularity of the versi-tip shooting head system comes from the interchaneable sink tips for a lot of Alaska fishing, IMO.

    If you don't feel like laying down the $130 for the versi-tip selection, you can basically make something similar for a fraction of the price.

    You can also use a standard WF floating line with interchangeable tips to create some sink-tip options to cover varied water conditions. Pick up a couple of full sink lines/shooting heads on sale for $10 or $20 (they had some at Mountain View a week ago, for starters). Get an intermediate and a fast sink density if possible. Cut the line to various lengths... 5', 10', 15', etc. Make loops in the end by stripping off an inch of the outer coating (loop 20lb mono around the line, tighten, pull). Fold the line back to make a loop and tie the exposed core to the line with thread. Cover in Goop or a similar flexible glue. Connect your new sink-tips to your WF floating line as needed with a loop to loop connection.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  5. #5
    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    I use a 10wt lamiglass w/ a ross cimmarron reel spooled w/ 30lb. maxima brown mono. no fly line or backing
    once I was at the Gulkana bridge and after rigging my 3 kids and wife the only rod I had left was a 6wt lamiglass w/ my ross cimmarron and floating flyline, and 10lb junky leader...caught a 45lb buck that was barely blushed. Fought him for 45 minutes and a guy on the other side of the river ran across the bridge w/ his dipnet and he fell and went ***** over tea kettle and sprang to his feet and netted it for me by time it was over, the bridge was lined w/ spectators. French cut panties were flyin down to wipe the sweat off my brow! Seriously tho something like a sealion or shark had chewed this fishes tail up pretty bad and I figured that attributed to me landing this beauty.

  6. #6
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    I'd start with a floater, that way you can nymph em if you need too, lots of places aren't good swinging water.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  7. #7
    Member jay51's Avatar
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    You'll do ok with a 9wt set-up for kings, a 10wt would be better, but it is a bit of overkill for silvers and such. I fish a Redington RS4 9wt with a phlueger 9/10 reel and use it for everything from kings to slivers, reds, and steelhead. I agree with the othe guys about line choice, personally I run #30 backing, 9wt Sci. Angler floating line, leaders of 12# maxima chameleon for Steelhead and silvers, and up to 20-30lb for kings. I have a spare spool that I got for half price spun-up wirth the same 30# backing but with a Sci. Angler sink-tip fly line, but I rarely use it unless I'm fishing a real deep clean pool w/out any snags, I hate losing pieces of that sink-tip when it gets wrapped around a log or something!
    best of luck,
    -J

  8. #8
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    Get a floating line (I use Rio Grand), and then buy some T-8 or T-14 line and you can make custom tips in any length you want. If you do this, though, dont use the braided loops that come with it. Just fold the end of the line over on itself, tie it really tight with fly-tying thread, and do 3-4 whip finishes, then cover it with head cement.

  9. #9

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    I use a 10wt lamiglass w/ a ross cimmarron reel spooled w/ 30lb. maxima brown mono. no fly line or backing
    once I was at the Gulkana bridge and after rigging my 3 kids and wife the only rod I had left was a 6wt lamiglass w/ my ross cimmarron and floating flyline, and 10lb junky leader...caught a 45lb buck that was barely blushed. Fought him for 45 minutes and a guy on the other side of the river ran across the bridge w/ his dipnet and he fell and went ***** over tea kettle and sprang to his feet and netted it for me by time it was over, the bridge was lined w/ spectators. French cut panties were flyin down to wipe the sweat off my brow! Seriously tho something like a sealion or shark had chewed this fishes tail up pretty bad and I figured that attributed to me landing this beauty.
    I still have my first chuck and duck rig and 8/9 10' lamglass with a STH #2 reel its loaded with #30 amniesa and a 12' leader of Chomilun/ultra green. Usually a BB shot about 18" up from the fly or spon bag.

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