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Thread: .....the little, yet costly things........

  1. #1
    Member aksheephuntress's Avatar
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    Default .....the little, yet costly things........

    ....Hunting details overlooked in the field (or in preparation) that can potentially kill a hunt ....

    -seemingly small things that can have big reprecussions....



    -toenails that are too long- *
    -unzipped pack compartments-
    -rifle sling swivel problems-
    -barrel contamination-
    -choosing what to bring along on a stalk, and what to stash*....



    -You all probably have lots of examples, or situations you've been in where a detail seemingly small (overlooked, taken for granted, or whatever),has ended up creating a serious situation....
    ....a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed....

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by aksheephuntress View Post
    ....Hunting details overlooked in the field (or in preparation) that can potentially kill a hunt ....

    -seemingly small things that can have big reprecussions....



    -toenails that are too long- *
    -unzipped pack compartments-
    -rifle sling swivels-
    -barrel contamination-
    -choosing what to bring along on a stalk, and what to stash*....



    -You all probably have lots of examples, or situations you've been in where a detail seemingly small (overlooked, taken for granted, or whatever),has ended up creating a serious situation....
    As long as i dont forget my rifle, ammunition, or knife i am fine. Helps to have a flashlight and some matches too. The rest can be improvised.

  3. #3
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Inexpensive

    Talking too much, Moving too fast, Moving too slow, Not sitting enough ect........the techniques that money can't buy are most valuable.

    Paper tissue for clearing optics

    Electrical tape for barrel

    Quality food stuff

    Everything else is fairly expensive......

    I don't compromise too much on Tents, Boots, Packs, Rifle, Knife/stone, Sleeping gear, and clothing. I guess I'll never make it into the loin cloth and stone knife club.

  4. #4

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    Bolts come in handy! made that mistake once, pulled up on a nice black bear on an evening drive and had a WHAT the F moment.

  5. #5
    Member aksheephuntress's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    Talking too much, Moving too fast, Moving too slow, Not sitting enough ect........the techniques that money can't buy are most valuable.

    Paper tissue for clearing optics

    Electrical tape for barrel

    Quality food stuff

    Everything else is fairly expensive......

    I don't compromise too much on Tents, Boots, Packs, Rifle, Knife/stone, Sleeping gear, and clothing. I guess I'll never make it into the loin cloth and stone knife club.

    .....thanks for posting, Bighorse...!

    -I especially agree with "the techniques that money can't buy are most valuable."




    ....a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed....

  6. #6
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Default

    If you are going on any hunt that requires mechanical vehichles, a tube of pig putty is a life saver. Plug holes in boats, fab some metal, etc. Never leave home without it.
    In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
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    If I come across as an arrogant, know-it-all jerk, it's because I am

  7. #7
    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Default Pig putty?

    Where do you find it and what is the real name on the tube/Jar?
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

  8. #8
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thewhop2000 View Post
    Where do you find it and what is the real name on the tube/Jar?
    it is pig putty


    Little things:
    550 cord
    filling up your water bottle when you have the chance

    get a good camel bak bite valve, not the slip on the tube type. once they get yanked off they never stick right and having them fall off never to be seen again turns your hydration bladder into a hard to use water bottle AFTER dumping all of your water on the ground!

    This kind sux

    This kind rocks

    It is also compatile with the ketadyne pro hike filter for filling through the drinking tube!


    a spare mini bic

    repeat the trim toenails prior to trip

    merino wool socks (they wear for days without blisters and don't stink!!)

    LED headlamp

    extra blades for the havel knife

    spare battery for camera or other important electronics

  9. #9
    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Little things:
    550 cord
    +1 on the 550 cord, that stuff is worth its weight in gold when you are out on a fly in hunt. you can pull out the strings in the middle of it and use those too.

  10. #10
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Default

    Don't lose your keyring; especially if every key you own is on it . $400 to have my truck re-keyed (it was pre-key codes).
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  11. #11
    Member aksheephuntress's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Don't lose your keyring; especially if every key you own is on it . $400 to have my truck re-keyed (it was pre-key codes).

    ...I know what you mean!!

    -similiar thing happened to me...although our truck keys are somewhere on Mt. Marathon!!
    .....$350 for a locksmith to come down from Anchorage!
    -hubby was so mad!! (rightfully so-)
    ....a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed....

  12. #12

    Default just my thoughts

    Toilet paper vs. Wet wipes

    bungy chords

    but nothing will make up for common sense and rational thinking in tough situations

  13. #13
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default locking valve

    That locking valve is indeed super valuable. +1

    I don't use BIC lighters because when wet don't function well. Butane igniter style lighters for me.

    Good fire starters are really cheap yet super important in SE. Chip wood with wax, roadside flares, fire paste, whatever you choose to get a roaring fire started.

    Also a nice saw is really, really important in my pack. I blaze trail, build fire, shelter, whatever.........a saw is a life saver in a bad situation.

    1 pound silicone impregnated tarp....ultralight....ultra important for emergency shelter.

  14. #14
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Default

    Here's a little thing I learned the hard way...

    After a 15 mile walk followed by 3 hours of bucking alder strewn mountainside I took a little break. As a unslung my pack I had one of those panic inducing moments...my rifle, which I had strapped to my pack so I could my hands free, was missing the bolt.

    I assume that crashing through the brush had bumped the safety then snagged the bolt handle and eventually hit the release. It took another hour of careful backtracking but I found it about 200 yards down the mountain.

    So now when I'm backpacking my rifle I have the bolt secured by a heavy rubber band. Thick, 3/8" wide about 2 dia. I pass through the trigger guard behind the trigger and loop it through itself then stretch it over the bolt knob.

    Several mountain hunts later with the same pack and rifle and never had a problem since.

  15. #15
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
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    Default

    never lost a bolt yet, but did have a big *** moment at a critical time....first 30-06 rifle i ever had was one my dad had built up and gave to me....it had a 93 springfield action, he must have "forgot" to explain it to me....it has the military safety thing.....jesus christ i went to shoot at a goat after a 3 hour stalk and i missed the first shot, look up and see a HUGE billy 50 yards away (nope we never seen him) i go to reload and the bolt will not go home.....spent all day tryin to figure it out....got home and called my dad (gunsmith) and asked him....he explained how you have to pull the pin back and reset it ( does anyone know what im talking about). jeez that was just a depressing day for me.



    Release Lake Trout

  16. #16
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    It seems like there are two categories of important things to take.

    1) What will save your life or make a very uncomfortable situation manageable
    2) what will help you kill something.

    1) Basics of Food, water, shelter (tarp), warmth (magnesium fire starter). Communication device, navigation, light, knife, rope/cord. This stuff is in my day pack/fanny pack.

    2) scope tools, bore snake, extra ammo, laser bore sight to check zero if I clobber my scope, tape, range finder, binos, lens cloth/cleaner. This stuff is also in my day pack/fanny pack.

    Then all the other stuff that is situational and not always totally essential.

  17. #17
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Default Good Post AKSHEEPHUNTRESS!

    Well, buddy dropped me off before daylight on a road in N Dakota and I was to walk several miles looking for mule deer. He was going to leave truck halfway and do the same going several miles in opposite direction. Was an all day Mule Deer hunt - only problem was as I unzipped the case I had a .243 and I was carrying .280 ammo! I had brought 2 identical gun cases and in the darkness of the truck grabbed the wrong case - so almost 9 hours later of walking with an empty gun I got to the truck!
    Motto
    A Check the case
    B Now I Always use a sling that holds a few rounds in case you forget to check the case!
    Also, more than once I have went out on a whim for a quickie hunt only to score on a big animal - then had to figure out how to deal with it! Good news / Bad news scenario!

  18. #18
    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Default attitude...

    i'd say i see negative attitude ruin more hunts than anything else. you can get away with crappy gear in a pinch, you can overcome horrible weather with a little calm and camp prep know how, you can do alot in a hunt to improvise and make it turn out. rarely do wilderness hunts go exactly as planned (more like never) and the minute a guy starts to get negative a number of things happen....attention to hunting wanes (not allert, not glassing, etc etc) in a group situation its contagious and makes it even harder for anyone else in the hunt to keep moral up. i've watched guys go from having the ablsolute time of their lives to being completely immoralized and emotionally done after being forced to wait out a real alaska storm for a few days. when, had they stayed positive, realized that nobody can do anything about the weather but try to stay upright and dry, and patiently weathered the experience they could have enjoyed the rest of there hunt when the weather cleared. i know some of you guys have seen it...you take a group of hunters and put in one bad egg, or complainer...stick em out in the wilderness for ten to fourteen days and see how hard it is to keep moral up.

    anyway, just my thoughts. a little mental preparation for everyone embarking on an adventure with a group (two or more hunters) should include preparing yourself to be positive and to do whatever you can do to keep a positive moral. hunters who are into it, who keep their enthusiasm till the last minute of the last day, and help there partners to do the same...those guys kill stuff.

    i think the same applies to solo guys, when we quit on ourselves out there, or get down on ourselves and have a negative attitude, then we might as well go home.

    once again, just my couple cents.

  19. #19
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Default Hats off to ya Ninefoot

    I have been with hunters - some were my friends - that I could not wait to get away from like you stated. Everything snowballed into doom and gloom.
    You are wise way beyond your years my friend - anybody that can take several groups of strangers week after week and like you say "keep them propped up" is a tough act!
    Some of my best hunts ended at the last hour and I have no regrets while others were packing bags back at camp!

  20. #20
    Member RC23's Avatar
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    Smile

    duct tape and beer

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