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Thread: Fly Line

  1. #1
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    Default Fly Line

    How do you determine if it is time for a new one? I've had mine for 3 years and never treated it or anything. Just wondering what signs or things to look for, or should I just go get new line? Thanks

  2. #2
    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
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    If it has cracks all the way down it and/or dosen't float very well anymore, it's probably time for a new line...like mine

    I quick cleaning with dish soap and warm water can go a long ways too. Mine usually last at least 4-5 seasons of regular use.
    Nice Marmot.

  3. #3
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowdy15 View Post
    How do you determine if it is time for a new one?

    If you are asking, likely the time has came

    Below is a great line....

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...497&hasJS=true


    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  4. #4
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    If you can't see cracks in the fly line coating and it still fishes fine by your standards, keep using it. If the line is visibly cracked, probably time to replace it. Although, if it's got a few cracks but isn't hinging or otherwise affecting your cast, you can probably get away with using it a little longer.

    There are always new and better lines coming out, but personally I can usually find something more pressing to spend my money on until I know I need a new line.

    A good wash as skookum suggested is advised from time to time.

    I keep my older cracked lines for flipping reds on the Russian (for myself and visiting family/friends). Doesn't make a bit of difference if the line is new or not in that situation.

    An inch of fly line coating stripped off the core from an old line makes a great subtle strike indicator for nymphing.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  5. #5
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Agree, today's lines seem capable of function well beyond their looks...

    Until recently, I fished a few times each summer with a guy up the Talkeetna. He's one of those guys that just plain catches fish.

    I knew he'd been given a gift Sage rod that he'd fished for years, so one afternoon I asked him about the rod, gear in general and whether he thought any of it was making his fishing more effective.

    He just showed me the fly line he was using... looked like that crackle paint furniture refinishers use to give an antique appearance. No kidding. Here's what he said, "got it out of the dumpster".

    No doubt there are functional properties of modern fly lines that, if compromised, will affect performance, but whether it's in a measurable or noticeable way...not so clear to me. Those ads, all those "new and improved" slogans each year?... Marketing.

  6. #6
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default On the other hand...

    Quote Originally Posted by bowdy15 View Post
    How do you determine if it is time for a new one? I've had mine for 3 years and never treated it or anything. Just wondering what signs or things to look for, or should I just go get new line? Thanks
    My brother, years ago discussing whether regripping golf clubs made a real difference, made a good point. If you believe they will, then new grips could sharpen your focus, or enthusiasm in a way that might make you more effective right away.

    Maybe new fly line, or a new fly you believe it... is the same? "Be the ball" (Caddy Shack). Be the fly line?

  7. #7
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    Default Thanks

    Thanks for all the responses and the link Dan.

  8. #8
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    I change my trout line out every spring. I just dont want to chance it. I have used my 8wt line for reds for 2 to 3 years. After a hundred reds it does tend to stretch out and does crack.
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  9. #9
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    Default 1 rod

    Yea I've only had one rod for the last couple years so I'm getting the feeling its time to change it out! I have a new (to me) 6WT St. Croix for smaller streams up north and such.

  10. #10
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    the biggest thing I look for is whether or not I can get the last 10 feet or so of the line to float anymore.... if it's too old and cracked then it won't float no matter how well you clean it. Mending becomes a real problem when this happens, and it would then be time to purchase another line.
    www.akfishology.com

    fishing isn't about life or death... it's more important than that.

  11. #11

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    man call me cheap, I'll use them till they get trashed.

    If you cant clean them good enough to shootm, change.

    if they end up stiff, change it....had a pike taper that turned as hard as a uncooked spaghetti noodle.

    obviously cracked.

    Changing them yearly? I wouldnt...Store them properly and you'll get more then a few years of use from them! Clean them regularly, and coat them with your fav line cleaner (I like glide), and they'll last you quite some time!

  12. #12
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    I change mine out every 2-3 years, that is about how long they last (for me) before they become cracked and weaken. The main thing is proper care of the line, clean it regularly and use a good dressing on it and they will last you several years at a time (I use mucilin, its cheap and works great). I learned the hard way to not fish a cracked line when I hooked a 10 lb. carp with one and my line snapped in half, I wont make that mistake again.
    Fish when you can, work when you have to.

  13. #13
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    a good cleaning and a coating of a line lube goes a long long way in shoot-ability.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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