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Thread: .45 ACP reloads

  1. #1

    Default .45 ACP reloads

    purchased a nice FNP-45 and am going to try my hand at reloading for this pistol. Ive reloaded many a rifle calibers but not pistols. Any advice for dies? bullets, powder, loads? I do not have a progressive press, just the old standard RCBS one stage. Anyone have experience reloading .45 ACP with a single stage? If so, please share your experience and insight! Thanks in advance!
    Chaps

  2. #2

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    remember the 45.acp is a basic saight wall cartrigde and you need to remember that the round use a basic taper type of crimp on the round to hold the bullet in place ..

    also start low in the powder dept then build up a low powder stand point from there when going out of the reloading manuals ..what i mean by that ..the book calls for 4 grains of powder ..you start with two and a half intill you get your mix right to produce a good round out of the reloading machine ..so go with a low starting point as the powder chage calls for then work you way up from there ..plus intill you get everything adusted right ..every 20 of rounds take one from the fresh reloaded pile and break the round down and measure the powder charge to make sure the powder charge is putting the right amount of powder for the load into the round ..so you not going to have any oh cr---moments when fireing the pistol in the range ..

    do not try to hot rod a round when makeing up a load for the pistol ..the round runs fine in the area of 850 to 950 fps intill you are comfortable with reloading the round then you can make up your own personal thumpers.

  3. #3
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    When seating cast bullets, make sure you have a little of the widest part of the bullet above the mouth of the case for the case to crimp into. A bullet pushed back into the case raises pressure a lot. Use a taper crimp die and crimp just enough to turn the case mouth in a little. The 45acp head spaces on the case mouth so don't crimp it in too far. Two of my favorite powders are W231 and UNIVERSAL Clays. Both meter very well from a powder measure. I weigh about every tenth powder charge before loading that round as I don't like pulling down loaded rounds. On a single stage you can eyeball all the powder charges at once in a loading block to prevent double charges or missing charges. I'm not picky about brand of dies.

  4. #4

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    Dies don't matter a whole lot as RBuck said. I also agree about the crimping. My first choice of powder for .45 ACP is Bullseye and after that Unique. Both meter well and make for nice, mild plinking loads that will still work the action on a 1911.
    NRA Life Member, Prior F-16 crew chief.

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    I have the Lee carbide dies and they work very well. I also use their powder measure and meter out 5 gr of Bullseye and top a 230 gr case bullet. Goes out my Springfield and Sig at 750 fps. Preforms flawlessly!

    It is a hoot and habit forming. Enjoy. J.

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    Pick up a Lee Factory Crimp die to crimp your rounds. Makes life so much easier...esp. for an auto!

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    I agree on the Lee Factory Crimp die. Regardless, you definitely want to seat and crimp in separate steps.

    Mike

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    I have loaded a lot of 45 using one die for seating and crimping and it works fine once properly set up. It usually takes two or three trys and damaged bullets (if using cast) to get it set correctly. Setting oal first on one die and then setting crimp on a second die is easier and you shouldn't damage any bullets in the process but it isn't necessary. I have never used the Lee factory crimp set up so I don't know what advantage they might have. I have heard that they may size down a cast bullet as they are crimping but I don't know that for fact. Can anyone comment on why the Lee is a better method?

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    The Lee FCD die sizes the finished round down to minimum SAAMI specs if I remember correctly. If you have thick brass or bullets greater than .452" diameter then it would probably squish the bullet down .001" or so. With normal brass and .452" bullets mine barely rub the inside of the die's carbide sizing ring. With .451" jacketed bullets there is no contact other than just ironing out the flare of the case mouth.

    Mike

  10. #10
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    MikeT
    Thanks for the response. I thought thats how they worked but hadn't used one. That would be a disadvantage if you are trying to shoot an oversized cast to match an oversized bore but would certainly make adjustment easy for jacketed bullets or normal sized cast.

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