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Thread: a cord of wood

  1. #1

    Default a cord of wood

    how much does a cord of brich cost? any body know what the going rate is.

  2. #2
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    ...about 6 hours if you are cleaning up the limbs.
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  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phish Finder View Post
    ...about 6 hours if you are cleaning up the limbs.

    lol, i think you missed it Phish, whats it sell for?

  4. #4

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    About $300.00 and maybe more, for a "HONEST" cord, split & delivered. But most will try to sell you a mix of spruce, hemlock, & a small amount of birch.

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    Member power drifter's Avatar
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    There is an add on craigs today under material and there is a birch cord in the round delivered in wasilla for $100.00. This is a great price if it's a true cord. He says he needs money. If I was looking I'd jump on this.

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    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mccrimmon View Post
    lol, i think you missed it Phish, whats it sell for?

    Simple folk make simple posts

    Andrew, that's a nice avatar you have there!

    The guy in front should have a beer, a bowl, and a rod in his hands instead of the oar.
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    Quote Originally Posted by power drifter View Post
    There is an add on craigs today under material and there is a birch cord in the round delivered in wasilla for $100.00. This is a great price if it's a true cord. He says he needs money. If I was looking I'd jump on this.

    As you most likely know, the Legal description of a cord, it could not be in the configuration of rounds.

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    Member power drifter's Avatar
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    Yes, that's true and most people think a big pickup load is a cord and really it's pretty hard to fit a cord into a pickup without some racks on the sides.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    A legal description of a cord is a stack of wood 4'tall x 4' deep x 8' long. Now, if they describe it in the round then you get that sized pile in the round. If they describe it split you will get more wood because it will be stacked tighter.

    That being said, there is no way I'd pay more than $200 a cord for birch, but people are getting more than that.

    With my current heating system a cord is worth about 100 gallons of heating oil. At $300 a cord you are paying the equivilant of $3.00/gal of heating fuel...which is more than the $2.60/gal that is the current price of heating fuel.

    A dry cord of birch will weigh about 3200# and green cord will be in the 5200# range...no way you are getting that in the back of a pickup truck. I usually can get .65 of a cord in my truck.
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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I found several sources from $160 to $250 a cord depending on where you are at. Craigslist, Alaskalist, etc..
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  11. #11

    Default

    thanks for the input everyone

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    I found several sources from $160 to $250 a cord depending on where you are at. Craigslist, Alaskalist, etc..
    I spent that amount of money on a husky saw and will make some trips w/ the F250 and the kids to harvest my own this year. The saw and $30 for a new maul and I should be in fire wood for the next 20+ years...

    BTW, if anyone else knows the permit process for the various wood cutting area's near Palmer and how that all works to be legal I sure would appreciate the info!

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    You can get the permits online now. I think you used to have to go to the forestry office out by the Palmer airport.

    Here's the link:
    https://dnr.alaska.gov/FPS/index.cfm...&area_id=10280

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hbons View Post
    You can get the permits online now. I think you used to have to go to the forestry office out by the Palmer airport.

    Here's the link:
    https://dnr.alaska.gov/FPS/index.cfm...&area_id=10280
    Thanks for the link. Interesting they won't show you the map of the permit area until after you pay for the permit! Just like a Govt agency, whats next are they going to sell land where you have to pay for your property before they tell you where it is?

    Any one have a copy of the permit area maps? The Buffalo mine one is closest to me but I would drive farther if the wood is better. Would be nice to see what I get for my $$.

    Thanks!

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    Default careful who u deal with

    one thing to add let the buyer beware

    alaska has its share of people who will gouge (sp?) you, hows that song go they smile in your face .......

    most cases you can find a cord of birch for $250+ delivered might be extra.

    although most of the birch has a high water content which could mean its still frozen or you could be seeing water leaking out of your flue joints.
    the reason for this high water content is that most of the birch is so deep in the woods it requires freezing weather to get back to it and generally it is old growth birch which is sometimes coming from 2ft+ in diameter base birch. its really hard to find dry birch because its gone as fast as its cut because of demand. if it is just green you'll be ok as long as its burned with a mixture of dry wood or spruce. just a word to the wise ! i heat over 6,000 sqft a year so i've had my share of dealing with those who don't mind gouging ! good luck!

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    I know that some folks made a killing this winter collecting easy access spruce and birch from the HUGE**** right of way cut along the Parks Hwy north of Willow. Bummer to own a home that was 250' from the highway, now you can watch the traffic from your kitchen table!!

    What a sham that whole thing is...do they not realize what grow in that soil when you remove the black spruce and disturb the soil??? Willow, poplar, birch....moose browse extraordinar!! Good job DOT (or AMF or whoever..)

    I digress...Mccrimmon, I'll sell you all the beetle killed black spruce you want..$50/cord, bring a saw and a pickup

    I'll burn dry spruce over birch any time!!!

  17. #17
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Birch

    Birch more than any other wood needs to be split as soon as possible. If not the resins in the wood and the bark only allow moisture to escape from the cut ends of the logs. Most birch, laying in the woods decays very fast because of this. A standing dead birch would be a prize down here.

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Dave, we have lots of ice/wind killed standing birch at our place...they will rot standing up too if the bark is on...

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    If you cut them in the fall, then take your saw and run a cut down the lenght of the tree about 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch they will dry out a lot faster. By the next year they are pretty much ready for the stove. ( Birch)

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    Ideally, you'd cut down a live birch, cut it up, split and stack it, and let it sit covered for 2 years. More realistically, let it sit, stacked and covered for a year. Cutting down a birch in the fall and trying to burn it that winter is just going to make a lot of smoke.

    I'd take dry birch over dry spruce any day. But, spruce dries faster and is more available so we burn quite a bit of spruce too.

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