Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30

Thread: Throw Bag / Survival

  1. #1

    Default Throw Bag / Survival

    I am interested in preparing a throw bag to keep in the Boat for “Just in Case” moments.
    I figured on items like fire starters, extra radio with batteries, SPOT, water and water filtration, smoke bomb / flair, food.
    Any one that has had some experience putting this together I would appreciate your input.


  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hitch View Post
    I am interested in preparing a throw bag to keep in the Boat for “Just in Case” moments.
    I figured on items like fire starters, extra radio with batteries, SPOT, water and water filtration, smoke bomb / flair, food.
    Any one that has had some experience putting this together I would appreciate your input.
    I'd add a knife and a hatchet or saw and a first aid kit.

    It's also a good idea to take it with you if you are hiking around on shore. It would be a pity to hike off to explore an island, get injured, and have all your survival gear on the boat.

  3. #3
    Member Larsenvega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    348

    Default

    In addition to what you already mentioned, I also have the following:

    1. Emergency blanket (weird foil kind)
    2. 25 ft shot of parachute cord
    3. 1 small fire starter log (kind you get at walmart)
    4. small signal mirror
    5. vacuum sealed towel
    6. vacuum sealed change of clothes (1 shirt, jeans, socks, beanie)
    7. an old 9mm w/10 rds (yep, for real)
    8. all the parts of MRE's that I never eat (peanut butter, condiments, nasty beef hash, etc)
    9. water tablets
    10. small LED flashlight w/2 spare AA's

    That's all I can think of for now. Here's a pic of what my ditch bag looks like. I put a hand-held VHF next to it for scale. Surprisingly small, watertight, and durable kit. I keep it loose at my bow so if anything bad goes down, it is more likely to be nearby and not go down with the ship in a cargo hold somewhere. Great thread by the way! One rep point for you!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    Member fullbush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,674

    Default redundant FYI

    store your survival gear in an accessible dry spot that isn't in close proximity of a potential fire or buried somewhere that it may be too smokey or toxic to feel for if you can't see. Emergencies especially at sea happen in a blink of an eye. One second you may be on top of the world enjoying life and the next second the decision you make may be a life....food for thought

    Take it from me, a guy that had to abandon a burning boat w/o a survival suit because the survival suit was in the heart of the fire melted
    Oh yeah the coast guard helo was in Kodiak at the time, 90 min out. Thank God a crowley tug cut loose from his tow and rescued me It was nov 1 high pressure day blowing 65 north off the mainland, the tug smacked a rock w/ his bow while getting blow side ways it was almost another disaster

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    335

    Default Here is a little test

    Just to give you an idea of the things you'd like in an emergency situation.
    Set your self down in the back yard with just what you ware to work or say the usual clothes you live in every day nothing special no cheating, a pen and paper. friday nite, sat. and sunday.
    you have the whole weeekend to stay in that one place and think of all the things you wish you had been able to take out there with you.
    If you can live 3 days with nothing more than you wear regularly you might servive. I've spent several nites and days on searches for people with no sleep and walking and walking .
    stress on water is different .
    having fishing gear would be smart by the way.
    But spending some time stuck in one place not being able to move any where , in the water, more complicated problem. are you a float or sinking. Are there preditors, a storm, heavy seas, cold chop.
    Preparedness has every thing to do with anticipating the potential dangers involved. If they never occur all the more reason to be prepared of the sake of others you may rescue some day.
    Skills and practice ar more valuable and important than supplies sence supplies are potentially unavailable. Practicing your ropes knots rigging the hard ware, and commmon resources.

  6. #6
    Member chico99645's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    I started a tread on this last year. This is what I ended up with. Got it in a dry bag with about 8' of line attached with a caribeaner for quick attachment to my dingy. I basically seal it so no one gets in it and something gets used and not replaced due to kids or others not understanding the concept of a true emergency.

    Ditch Bag

    First Aid Kit

    Flashlight (Small Pelican LED Light)
    Extra batteries
    Advil packets
    4 Space blankets
    Blue tarp
    ¼ Rope 50’
    357 ss revolver and ammo
    Bag of Trailmix from Costco
    8 water bottles
    Hand Held VHF Radio
    Hand held GPS
    Roll of Duct Tape
    Hand warmers
    Fire starter (Cotton Balls and Vaseline)
    Waterproof matches
    Mirror
    Pistol Type gun and flares
    Leatherman
    whistle
    chapstick
    4 wool beanie hats 4 pair gloves 4 Pair Wool Socks (Vacuum Sealed)
    6 Large heavy duty Trashbags
    4-6 green/red glow sticks to make a buzz bomb (recent addition)

    Not in the bag but in same place of storeage, I keep a case of MRE's and 3 sleeping bags in dry bags also.

  7. #7

    Default

    Thank you for the Information. Very helpful

  8. #8
    Member fullbush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    2,674

    Default

    chico gets rep points from me just for the hilarious quip on political correctness

  9. #9

    Default

    I'd started looking into buying a "ditch bag", but didn't even think of using a generic dry bag as a ditch bag until someone here posted about it. I have a couple of dry bags already so that's going to save me some money.

  10. #10
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SOLDOTNA, AK
    Posts
    949

    Default

    some very good ideas, I will upgrade mine alittle from the ideas

    space blaket mummy bags would be better than the blanket maybe in addition to?

    i feel having most important basic items on your person, in my float coat ( or survival vest). (fire starter, signal device, space blanket mummy bag, knife in pocket or leatherman on belt) things happen fast and you are worrying about family members , getting raft launched and a million other things first.
    MY AQUAFIX GPS ( personal locator beacon) is attached to loop in pocket of my float coat so it is always there and can not be dropped / lost.

    Safety BREIFING EACH TRIP TO passengers as to location of bag and importance that someone grab it. fire extinguishers and other safety items. you may be injured or worse and they may need to save themselves.
    not tying down raft with impossible knots that people would struggle with to untie. strategical (sp) placed cheap knives duct taped to be able to cut raft tie downs (hopefully without cutting raft).
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
    MASTER BOWHUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR; MEMBER UNITED BLOOD TRACKERS; POPE & YOUNG MEASURER

  11. #11
    Member breausaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    830

    Default

    We have a ditch bag or sorts, it’s a dry bag we take to shore; we go to shore at least once or twice a day.
    Along with some to the items mentioned here we take along the air pump and repair kit for the tender, a Swedish Firesteel in place of matches or lighter, and a water filtration pump in place of extra water.
    Jay
    07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser
    OurPlayground.


  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by breausaw View Post
    We have a ditch bag or sorts, it’s a dry bag we take to shore; we go to shore at least once or twice a day.
    Along with some to the items mentioned here we take along the air pump and repair kit for the tender, a Swedish Firesteel in place of matches or lighter, and a water filtration pump in place of extra water.

    Be carefull about "replacing" matches or lighter with the firesteel. You may want to suplement the firesteel with a lighter or matches. I used to keep a firesteel in my float coat pocket, and when I took it out, it was all corroded from the rain water. The water makes it fall apart. So now I keep a lighter in my kit in addition to the fire steel.

  13. #13

    Default

    Reading the stories about actual boating accidents from the famous 'Lucette' to the more recent tragedy about the football players can help in figuring out what you really need. Many boats are equipped with everything you need, but when it all goes down in real time...

    My ditch bag is simple, doesn't have everything, but I look at it like this; If I happen to wash up on shore after losing my vessel and I actually manage to have this ditch bag with me, it will give me something to focus on and possibly act as a distraction considering things probably just went really bad.

    Orange dry bag -written in bold lettering "EMERGENCY -TAKE WITH YOU"
    Inside everything is vaccumed bag
    two shirts
    two hats
    two gloves
    matches, tool stuff, compass, water bottle, filter, first aid, etc.

    Basicly, whatever I could fit in the bag and that the bag wasn't going to take up space and cause a disaster by someone tripping over it.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    Reading the stories about actual boating accidents from the famous 'Lucette' to the more recent tragedy about the football players can help in figuring out what you really need. Many boats are equipped with everything you need, but when it all goes down in real time...

    My ditch bag is simple, doesn't have everything, but I look at it like this; If I happen to wash up on shore after losing my vessel and I actually manage to have this ditch bag with me, it will give me something to focus on and possibly act as a distraction considering things probably just went really bad.

    Orange dry bag -written in bold lettering "EMERGENCY -TAKE WITH YOU"
    Inside everything is vaccumed bag
    two shirts
    two hats
    two gloves
    matches, tool stuff, compass, water bottle, filter, first aid, etc.

    Basicly, whatever I could fit in the bag and that the bag wasn't going to take up space and cause a disaster by someone tripping over it.
    What?? No underwear??

  15. #15
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default Don't put off making your bag

    I'm dredging up this older thread because I remembered it and used it....for an embarrassing reason. Even thought I knew better, I put off making a survival bag last boating season, and that was plum stupid. I'll bet there are many who read this board who haven't put together their ditch bag yet. Take the time NOW to put together your bag before the main boating season arrives! It might just save the life of you and your passengers.

    I combined different items from the lists posted on this thread, and instead of posting what I put in my bag, I'm going to post some observations that I applied.
    • Batteries go bad, especially stashed away in an emergency bag. I put a hand crank charging flashlight in my bag.
    • Water bottles can break in a bag and soak what isn't vacuum sealed. I put an empty water bottle with a built in filter in my bag.
    • Fire starter, I've used cotton balls soaked with neosporin before, and they work well. But after a year or two of storage, they don't light very well. Instead, I put dry cotton balls in a pill bottle and a full tube of antiobiotic ointment in the bag. Cotton balls can be used with first aid kit stuff to stop bleeding in a bad wound, and the ointment can be handy too. Then if I need to start a fire, soaking the ball with the ointment makes a great fire starter. I threw in a couple candles too.
    • Hadn't seen anyone list a folding saw. Could prove valuable in making a shelter.
    • I vacuum sealed all clothing items, wook blanket, and steel items that might rust.
    • A heavy fixed blade knife can be abused & used unlike a folding knife or leatherman/gerber (which I included too).
    Bag is in the boat! Feels good.

  16. #16

    Default

    I use a throw bucket. I found in a tools catalog a fitting that snaps onto a 5 gallon bucket and has a lid that unscrews. I siliconed the fitting onto the bucket and the lid has a rubber o-ring for water tightness. I use a bright orange bucket from Homo depot for visibility. I leave enough air space with my emergency gear for the bucket to float. I have a lanyard with clip on the handle and bungee the bucket in the front of the boat where I can grab it without having to unhook it on the way over. Can be used to sit on in the boat and is almost impossible to put a hole in.

  17. #17
    Member chico99645's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HuntKodiak View Post
    I'm dredging up this older thread because I remembered it and used it....for an embarrassing reason. Even thought I knew better, I put off making a survival bag last boating season, and that was plum stupid. I'll bet there are many who read this board who haven't put together their ditch bag yet. Take the time NOW to put together your bag before the main boating season arrives! It might just save the life of you and your passengers.


    I combined different items from the lists posted on this thread, and instead of posting what I put in my bag, I'm going to post some observations that I applied.
    • Batteries go bad, especially stashed away in an emergency bag. I put a hand crank charging flashlight in my bag.
    • Water bottles can break in a bag and soak what isn't vacuum sealed. I put an empty water bottle with a built in filter in my bag.
    • Fire starter, I've used cotton balls soaked with neosporin before, and they work well. But after a year or two of storage, they don't light very well. Instead, I put dry cotton balls in a pill bottle and a full tube of antiobiotic ointment in the bag. Cotton balls can be used with first aid kit stuff to stop bleeding in a bad wound, and the ointment can be handy too. Then if I need to start a fire, soaking the ball with the ointment makes a great fire starter. I threw in a couple candles too.
    • Hadn't seen anyone list a folding saw. Could prove valuable in making a shelter.
    • I vacuum sealed all clothing items, wook blanket, and steel items that might rust.
    • A heavy fixed blade knife can be abused & used unlike a folding knife or leatherman/gerber (which I included too).
    Bag is in the boat! Feels good.
    I actually have a folding saw, looks like a 12" folding knife in my ditch bag but forgot to list it. I agree the water bottles can break and soak you bag. Gonna have to think on that one. Maybe vaccum seal a few bottles at a time. I prefer to have the bottles instead of a filter as it's useless unless you have a fresh water to filter.

  18. #18
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Chico, you made me laugh....not at you but at how different our situations are. You mentioned a drawback of just having a filter is that you need to have some fresh water around. That's the funny part. Here in Kodiak, I never have a problem finding water.

    Plenty wet around here.

  19. #19

    Default

    In addition to the items previously listed (except the gun, which I might add) we maintain a pup tent in our survival kit. The resides inside a 5 gallon bucket that sits atop the roof unstrapped. If the boat flips, the bucket would float and be recoverable. It stays put in rough seas as it rests between the roof rail and radar arch and can't move fore because of the dinghy. It serves the dual purpose of a seat for rowing the dinghy so we never leave the boat without it. What room remains after packing it with gear we cram ramon, candy and trailmix. The other thing we find useful is o vacuum seal everything to keep it from drawing damp and to mnimize the amount of space things take up in the bucket (especially the tent). Hope that helps.

  20. #20
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1

    Question

    Looking at several of these "ditchbag" posts for awhile now. I decided to join to point out something missing for me at least. I have to take several prescription meds so I'm wondering what is the best way to do that? Put them in a water tight and/or crush proof container? I'm thinking of having at least a 5 to 7 day supply that I'll make up just before each outing to keep them fresh. Any ideas?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •