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Thread: Say I Draw a tag? When ever they may come out.

  1. #1
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    Default Say I Draw a tag? When ever they may come out.

    I put in for DS136, DS137 and DS141 mainly becasue if I do draw, they did not pose that much of a logistical nightmare, for a Solo Sheep hunter coming up from Texas. For your guys first thought yes, I am an Alaskan Resident.
    On to my question. With all the vairables you can think off. Realistically How many miles on average do you think someone would cover or have you have covered on foot? Just a steady pace no rush and ample daylight.
    I have read of people trekking in 20miles to get to where they sheep hunt. Along with watching the Alaska Expermint and they average about 6 miles a day.

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    With 136 and 137 you'd be looking at anywhere from 5-20 miles, whereas 141 could be shorter. As for how long it would take you, 6 miles a day seems a little on the low side, but that depends on your access trail and your fitness.

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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Wink Fortunate few...

    For 136 and 137, the flat trail miles are not a problem for anybody who hikes or backpacks and is reasonably trim and conditioned. The only difficult few miles are when you leave the river bottom trail and bushwack up to sheep elevation. So the flat miles would generally not take a conditioned hiker more than two or three hours hiking time even with a standard overloaded pack. The mile or two of bushwacking up to sheep killing elevation can take the rest of the daylight hours of that day, if you are not familiar with the different routes.

    There are those who "routinely" hike that country and have found some convenient moose trails that reach up above the highest elevation of alderbrush. As in any and every hunt, pre-approach info gained by preseason weekend hiking, can reduce the energy expendature of wrestling with alders, wasted uphill miles and hours...

    Those are very high percentage and wonderful hunts for the fortunate few who draw them.

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    I thought 6 miles was low myself for hike. Atleast the one thing i am guarnteed is to know wether or not I draw one of the hunts, before I am up there at the end of April for a Graduation.
    Should be able to break away from the in-laws and do some scouting, that's only if I am so fourtunate to need to do it.

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    Member aksheephuntress's Avatar
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    ....just a thought, if your question was an emphasis on wondering about the time factor for getting into an area, harvesting, and packing out....(sounds like your fitness is not a factor)-

    -Weather , in my opinion, (can be) probably the most determining factor in the length in time of a (successful, or unsuccessful) sheep hunt...
    -The rams can be there; but,having a low pressure system set in with thick cloud cover for days, can change a maybe 2-4 day sheep hunt into 9 or 10...(or more)

    -lots of other factors, and variables, of course...(terrain, just finding the rams,hunting pressure, to name a few-)

    -the only thing I get "stressed out" about a sheep hunt, is if I have to deal with a time constraint ...
    -You HAVE to make time for it...



    -Good luck with your hunt!
    -and you'll probably end up with an addiction!!
    ....a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ynggrasshopper View Post
    I thought 6 miles was low myself for hike. Atleast the one thing i am guarnteed is to know wether or not I draw one of
    Just make sure you slow way down when you are hunting! This is one of the main reason I think unguided sheep hunters have a lower success rate.

    Goal on a sheep hunt is to spot them before they spot you!

  7. #7
    Member Randy907's Avatar
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    They are hard hunts, i drew ds139 last year and only had 3 days to hunt it due to a longer trip before it. The first day in from the parking lot i hiked a total of 12 miles a day with a full pack, I hiked about 9 miles the other days and stopped for a while to glass and saw nothing legal, just a bunch of banana rams.

  8. #8
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    Default Heres another question?

    sheephuntress, I also don't think my physical conditioning will be a factor. I also plan on spending a minimum 10days afield. More if i think I am going to kill a day just hiking to where I feel would be a good spot.
    I know the more time the better. Spent 4 days in the Wrangells after sheep we didn't spot a legal ram till day 4, Granted it was still only 3/4. Was aggravated didn't have another day to attempt a stock.
    The other question, Studying Topo's out of the Gazette and will pick up more detailed one if the need arises. If you were to have to go in blind, and only having topos for reference, what do yall look for in the terrain that makes you think there might be sheep there.

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