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Thread: What do you think about ported or drilled tracks

  1. #1
    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    Default What do you think about ported or drilled tracks

    Looking for real world info on the strength of a ported or drilled track such as the one in this picture. I know what the purpose is for less weight, less rotational mass, quicker take offs, etc., but has anyone had a ported track break and how would they be on a mountain sled. The reason I am asking this is that I am buying a sled that already has a ported track and I would hate for a track to break in the middle of nowhere!

    http://c.im.craigslist.org/6y/T5/Fkp...Ju40WshcM3.jpg
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    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    I wouldn't worry about it. I'm thinking about doing it to my RMK. I checked out the Crazy Mountain Extreme site (you know, the guys with the ultra light $24,000 sleds!) and they are doing it to their new machines. You have to figure that these guys tested the snot out of the idea before they sold a sled with it done. I'm just trying to figure out the best tool for the job.....
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  3. #3
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    The only thing to look at on a track that you personally didn't drill, is how clean the hole is. Does it have nice clean edges or is it ragged and frayed from drilling it improperly? Clean cut holes are best as the cords have a clean edge and weren't ripped and torn out. There is a lot of opinions on where exactly to drill, but I haven't seen proof one way or another on some patterns working any better than others. This has been around for more than half a decade now and turboed sleds running nitrous run these tracks and haven't heard anything bad yet. By the way, it also keeps the snow from building up in the rear suspension. Less weight!!

  4. #4

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    From what I have read is it can save up to 40 lbs of weight from the build-up of snow and ice.
    Some of the drag racers have had problems with them,( but they have problems with all tracks) I have only heard good from the mountain boys.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt'N'Photos View Post
    Looking for real world info on the strength of a ported or drilled track such as the one in this picture. I know what the purpose is for less weight, less rotational mass, quicker take offs, etc., but has anyone had a ported track break and how would they be on a mountain sled. The reason I am asking this is that I am buying a sled that already has a ported track and I would hate for a track to break in the middle of nowhere!

    http://c.im.craigslist.org/6y/T5/Fkp...Ju40WshcM3.jpg
    The chances of you having it "break in the middle of nowhere" are very slim. Any failure would be gradual, not sudden. Inspect it occasionally.

    You'll probably see fatigue failure at the paddles long before the belt gives up.

  6. #6
    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Well thanks for the help, I took everyones advice and picked up that sled. Its a 2002 700 RMK vertical edge snowcheck model. I looked over the holes and they look like they were done pretty well. He has done alot of mods to this sled to reduce weight and make it run well in the really deep stuff along with a few things to make it sidehill better as well. I have a slight problem now though. I was carefully looking the sled over in my garage after I got it home and all thawed out and there is a flange on the bottom of the front of the right trailing arm where it attaches to the ski that looks like a steering stop. The tab on both the front and back are cracked pretty good and it is flared out at the bottom. The other side had been bent a while back and he heated and straightened it and then welded a small plate on the back of it to strenghten it back up some. I called the dealer and they want $200 a pop for them. Does anyone know of some good aftermarket arms, or are they even more expensive?
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  7. #7
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    I believe your talking about the notched tube at the bottom of the spindle housing? If the notched tube is all that's worn I'd take the trailing arm off and repair it. If you have access to a TIG welder it'd be easy. If not, somebody asked on another thread and was provided three salvage dealers names where they might find used trailing arms.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ead.php?t=7531

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