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Thread: Wildcat loading without data?

  1. #1

    Default Wildcat loading without data?

    I am looking for guidance from some of the more experienced reloaders on here. I just had a Winchester 94 rebored and chambered for 35-30/30. Load data for this old wildcat is virtually non-existant from what I can find. Several people have told me to just back off a couple of grains from 35 Remington starting loads and work up from there. This seems reasonable to me as the case capacity is close.

    I know what pressure signs to watch for when working with a bolt gun, but aren't normal pressure signs only showing up at levels way over pressure for a model 94?

    How do you know when you should stop when there is no existing load data to compare velocities to and you have to stay well below flattened primers and sticky extraction?

    Thanks for any advice. Evan

  2. #2
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    I just googled 35/30 and came up with an article on Auction Arms Forum showing several loads for this. 1 being 200gr jsp with 25gr IMR 4198. Several others listed.

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    Here you go from cartridges of the world
    200 jacketed, 25gr 4198, 1925 fps.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for taking the time to look those up, I really appreciate your effort. However, I already had that data, seeing as I have done every google search imaginable for this cartridge. The data that does exist is very limited.

    I guess I should have specified I am wondering about how to proceed with bullets and powders for which there is no existing data. I am curious as much in general reloading practice as I am specifically for this cartridge.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Murphy can work up numbers for any wildcat, PM or email him your bullet and powders you like for your 35-30 then give him some time in case he's not at the right house.
    Andy
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  6. #6
    Member Diesel Nut's Avatar
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    Evan,

    What I do when developing wildcat loads is find a cartridge of the same diameter with comparable case capacity and review the recipes for that cartridge to determine what loads are within the pressure window I'm looking for. As an example, the relatively obscure .375/284 is very close capacity-wise to the wildcat .375 Whelen. I dug through the loads I could find for the Whelen, made sure none exceeded the pressure of the base .284 Win cartridge (not even close) and then dropped 10% from the published bottom load to develop my starting point. It's not scientifically accurate, but it's a fairly reliable way to forage out on your own without buying a strain gauge.

    Regarding your load limit dilemma. It takes pressure to make velocity, and with similar case capacity, similar powder and similar bullets, pressure and velocity will be similar. Pressure signs in a lever action are terribly difficult to discern, but you'll know you're pushing your luck when you reach similar ballistics of a comparable capacity "published" load. I wish I could help more here, but without a means to measure pressure you're really just making an educated guess.

    -Adam

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel Nut View Post
    Evan,

    What I do when developing wildcat loads is find a cartridge of the same diameter with comparable case capacity and review the recipes for that cartridge to determine what loads are within the pressure window I'm looking for. As an example, the relatively obscure .375/284 is very close capacity-wise to the wildcat .375 Whelen. I dug through the loads I could find for the Whelen, made sure none exceeded the pressure of the base .284 Win cartridge (not even close) and then dropped 10% from the published bottom load to develop my starting point. It's not scientifically accurate, but it's a fairly reliable way to forage out on your own without buying a strain gauge.

    Regarding your load limit dilemma. It takes pressure to make velocity, and with similar case capacity, similar powder and similar bullets, pressure and velocity will be similar. Pressure signs in a lever action are terribly difficult to discern, but you'll know you're pushing your luck when you reach similar ballistics of a comparable capacity "published" load. I wish I could help more here, but without a means to measure pressure you're really just making an educated guess.

    -Adam
    Thanks Adam. That's the kind info I was looking for.

  8. #8
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    You need to find someone with the quick load program... The basic info they need are how long is the barrel, type of powder, bullet to be used, overall length of the case with bullet in the case and fill the case with water all the way to the mouth and weigh it. With all that info QL can give you pretty good figures... Or use dieselnut way which I have done in the past and still continue to do...

  9. #9
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Model 94s, at least in 30-30/30wcf will crack the lever open when pressures are slightly too high. That’s always been the back-her-down clue in my family but I don’t know how far it is between the action starting to open and a total failure. I suspect there is quite a bit of room there but I just don’t know. I have seen some 94s with the lever cracked open a bit and the top of the chamber blown off but never had it happen to anyone I know so never got facts to go with how it got that way . . . way too much of a too fast powder I would guess.

    That's the only pressure “sign” I have ever found with 94s and that takes some smoking hot 30-30 stuff. There are other indicators like feel, report, and speed but these will all be unknowns with a wild cat. So without pressure equipment you just got to go old school and do a lot of experimenting to learn the gun over time and rounds as you creep up on it.
    Andy
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  10. #10

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    Thanks all. The info is much appreciated.

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