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Thread: Things that make you...buy a .375HH?

  1. #1
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Things that make you...buy a .375HH?

    or other similar (or larger) caliber rifle?

    Dennis Confer (Hunt Alaska Now!, http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/sto...roducts_id=244) seemed to be doing just fine with his 7mm, until sometime after he encounters a large, VW- size brown bear, he switches to a .375. Tony Russ too I think switches from .338 to .375 for bears.

    This winter, a .375HH-shooting friend showed me video from his Fall'09 caribou hunt with a smaller-caliber-shooting friend. The .375 shooter used (way) fewer cartridges. Another friend likes his .375 for knocking down moose. And Joe Want, a Fairbanks guide who taught most of the Bear Hunting Clinic last month, made a point of how much less bears in particular travel after being shot with larger calibers. Bears more than other species seem to lead hunters to opt for a step-up in caliber.

    On another terrific thread (http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=18267), there's a recent black bear hunting tale which includes this: "...and started off down the mountain AGAIN, hit twice with a .308 (one lung/one abdomen after he was running) and one FMJ to the heart".

    I wonder how many hunters switched to a .375 or higher caliber rifle after some tribulations on large game, especially bears... or maybe moose. What makes people buy .375 or more?

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    Member northriver21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6XLeech View Post

    I wonder how many hunters switched to a .375 or higher caliber rifle after some tribulations on large game, especially bears... or maybe moose. What makes people buy .375 or more?
    I was charged by a griz on a moose kill a couple years ago. I shot him at ~12 yards (4 paces) with a 300 Win Mag. It stopped the charge but not the bear.

    After that little experience, I decided that I wanted more horsepower in a rifle. I wont debate that you do or do not need a .375 for Alaskan big game, but after this why not? I still think about that day often, I guess it was not my time to go.

  3. #3
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    Default funny thing

    My hunting partner and I got into a fire fight with a black bear at about 15-20 feet and the 375h&h didn't open up and do the damage I thought it would. Thank goodness the bear didn't have the 375.

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    Default Not Yet.

    Haven't found a need to "step-up" yet from my .300 RUM. I'm not ruling anything out in the future, but then again, I'm the guy who put a muzzle break on a .270 WSM.

  5. #5
    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Default Bears. period

    bears make people buy big guns. bears, and big animals that kill back, but for us in our state bears. killing bears and stopping bears are two V E R Y different things. pic your favorite deer gun, any of em'll do, and we can go kill brown bears with it all day long, i promise....but i'm just as confident that we will not go out with said pea shooter and STOP them all day long. bears who require a stopping rifle require a stopping rifle because they allready got holes poked in em, or because you just happen to be in there personal space. the weapon used in a bear fight has to break them down or destroy the brain/spine, and thats it...the other option, a bear that you didnt get stopped, kinda sucks

    so...take a moderately smart, sensible guy, put him into a few bear STOPPING scenarios and then watch that same dude go buy the biggest **** rifle he can shoot well...

    as an advocate of any 30 caliber rifle with a good bonded bullet i will say this...my 375h and h goes everywhere theres a decent chance i might be called apon to stop a bear, and when backing up bowhunting clients i carry a 458 (this due mainly to the large wound channel and better bleeding on the track, and it stops em quick)

    theres all sort of calibers that kill em consistently, but theres only a few that stop them consistently, and if there was ever a designated hitter in the brown bear hunting world, its the 375 handh. its been ballin up pissed off bears since its birth and will continue to do so consistently.

    just my opinion though

  6. #6
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default 375

    Even for goats I'd like one. I can't afford one now after my huge taxi bill from 2009, bitter sweet. I'd also like to spend any extra money on 2010 hunts. So hopefully I'll be singing the same tune in 2011....poor me, big taxi bill again. So I'll be using it's little cousin' for a bit, the 300 H&H with 200g Nosler Parts.

    The fall bear I got in 09 had no idea what hit him or where it came from. I was hunkered down in some trees laying prone and didn't move a muscle after sending the heat. In that case a small caliber did the job. I know though that a charging bear needs much much more persuasion. I hike through bear infested woods singing and raising all kinds of fuss just hoping to avoid encounters. Honestly.....almost every time I'm watching bears run off trying to avoid the crazy singing hunter. Singing ruins the quiet of the woods but sure keeps me from gettin chewed on.

    One day.....375 and the quiet of the woods will return.

  7. #7

    Default 375h&h

    I carry a 375 because I really like the performance and it doesn't kick me like a 338 did. I know every time I have shot an animal with it, I have felt confidence that the bullet is going to get where it needs to be even if the angle is a little off. So far it has always worked.

    I have been using the 275 grain grand slam and just feel I have found the perfect match for me of power and not hurting myslef when I pull the trigger.

    Whenever I have bumped into grizzlies at a short distance I feel more in control of the situation. I can talk to them firmly and yell at them to leave while knowing if something happens I at least can get off one shot that will hopefully give me more time to deal with the situation.

    Plus I just really like the look a the cartridge its a thing of beauty.

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Default 6X

    I met a wiry little chap about 30 years ago that had money and a plane - he flew and hunted all over N America. He relived one trip he and a friend took to BC for moose, bou and griz. All he had was a 7MM mauser with him that day and was seperated from his buddy. Anyway on a steep slope a big griz popped out above him - he debated but shot anyway - mistake - it spotted him and charged after being hit - momentum carried it past him as he kept firing. He said when he had his last round the brute was clawing back up hill at his feet and he put one in the hear at point blank. He was so shook up he thought he was going to pass out he said. After that he carried a 375 or a 460wby when around big bears.
    I think Ninefooter said it well - stopping is different than hunting....

  9. #9

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    I got rid of my .338 RS Tropical. I then got a .375 H&H never looked back. I've killed many a deer with my .270 in Montana. I have to say the 375 does great on the smaller animals with less bloodshot & does even better when they are bigger. IMHO it shoots whatever I stuff in it, recoil is a push and not a punch. I can neck it down and shoot the same case in my 300 H&H. What a wonderful round.

  10. #10
    Member Alaskan22's Avatar
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    Default ...

    Have the .338 win mag. Like the gun. Shot a 375 a year back. MUCH less recoil and shot well. Limits my range a bit, but then I realized my dumb arse should be limiting my range too instead of trying to reach out and touch something.

    Still haven't purchased the 375, but it is on the list.
    Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

    No guns: no peace. No safety!

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    Member highestview's Avatar
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    Default Double Rifle

    I've been thinking the same thing. I would like to buy a double rifle (quick second shot) in .375 but I cant seem to find one for less than $3000. Those rifles seem so simple, shouldnt there be cheap models somewhere? Anyone know a model that wont kill my finances?

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    I would like to buy a double rifle (quick second shot) in .375 but I cant seem to find one for less than $1000.
    I don't know that I would trust a cheap double or one in a rimless cartridge much less one that combined the two. That said- I've never seen a cheap double-ever. Even the cheap ones are way over what a new bolt gun will run you.

  13. #13

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    I went to a .375HH because my brown bear hunt clients use to get nervous when I was backed them with a 7mm Rem. Most of them were already skiddish enough( I like to get them in close) so I figured they didn't need any more aggravation. Plus if they were bow hunters I got nervous backing them with a 7mm
    It is true a 375 only take one maybe two rounds a 7mm usually takes a few more.
    Chuck

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    Member MNViking's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm no expert, but it seems to me, a .45/70 lever gun would be even better suited to a hairy situation. Much faster follow ups, big hole. Does the added velocity of a .375HH make that much of a difference?
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Marvin H. Clark Jr.

    (assistant guide to Pinnell and Talifson and author):
    "There are innumerable makes, models and calibers on the market, many of which are well suited for brown bear hunting, I prefer the .375 H&H magnum. It will belt you if you're unaccustomed to the load, but it's as reliable as any cartridge on the market... The .30.06 is the smallest rifle anyone out to rely upon for big bear hunting. Some years ago, many hunters touted the 7mm magnum as the cure-all cartidge. But as Bill Pinnell says, 'You've got to riddle the bear to kill it with a 7mm.' This is true, at least with large brown bears."

    I carried a Model 70 Winnie in .375 when I worked for the Forest Service out of Sitka in the 70s. It was the issued firearm when the USFS was still run by real men who liked to pull chain and cruise timber (instead of pose as rangers and run off people enjoying the woods in the old fashioned way). No other firearm gives one the feeling of security as does the .375. When I was off the job I carried a .30.30 for deer, and never felt at ease the way I did carrying the big gun. We were allowed unlimited rounds to practice with the .375 with iron sights, but after about four shots, one was done with the target practice. I never had to shoot a brownie with it, which I do not regret, since I only kill for meat by choice.

    I still carry a Model 70, but it is quite a bit lighter than the one I toted at age 18!

  16. #16

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    In addition to it's legendary performance, I think the 375H&H cartridge is just so dang pretty too.

  17. #17
    Member Milo's Avatar
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    Default 375rum

    Got a smoking deal on a 375rum, so I sold my 338wm and put a couple hundred bucks in my pocket. Rifle has almost identical trajectory with about 25% more energy and a bigger hole. Fortunately I stockpiled ammo when it was still affordable.

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    Member ninefoot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MNViking View Post
    I'm no expert, but it seems to me, a .45/70 lever gun would be even better suited to a hairy situation. Much faster follow ups, big hole. Does the added velocity of a .375HH make that much of a difference?
    with a brown bear at fifteen steps, no i dont think that the velocity is helping you to a degree that you'd notice, i doubt you'd see much difference at all, loaded right with good bullets the 45-70's aproaching 458 performance (which is phenominal) but remember that stopping a big bear isnt allways about the charge situation...more of the time its about making those quartering away raking shots downrange to avoid the "stop em at your feet" scenarios alltogether. and that is where a good guy with a bolt rifle in 375 shines...we're not meat hunting here, i want a gun that will shoot them end to end from any angle from zero to your max effective range ... with stopping penetration is key, full penetration every shot with bonded bullets that hold theyre weight. i'm not a ballistician or gun nut, but i know about ballistic coefficient and i know that calibers with a high bc penetrate deep. the bc on an h and h is excellent with 270 grain bullets and very good with 300 grain bulllets.

    as far as being faster, i dont know man...a guy who really knows how to turn a bolt from the shoulder can ACURRATELY produce pretty impressive rate of fire. key word being acurrate. (humbly) just my opinion and experiences...lol knowing the whole time that i'm a died in the wool fan of american bolt action rifles and have zero use for leverguns. knowing ALSO that guys like ed stevenson and a few others i'm sure depend on theyre leverguns to win bear fights...and hell, guys like ed proly forgot more about stopping brown bears than a young buck like me'd ever figure out.

    on the subject of the double guns...they seem to suit some of the african guys, but personally i'm particularly fond of the third, and fourth round in my bolt. in fact in my experience so far theyve been the MOST important. just my experience. god are double gorgeous though.

  19. #19
    Member aksheephuntress's Avatar
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    ....the thrill of the recoil!!!

    ....a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed....

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MNViking View Post
    Does the added velocity of a .375HH make that much of a difference?
    Not at close range... but then I think there's a whole lot of value to stomp something right good at 150yds. Then the up close stuff is pretty moot.

    That's always been the appeal of the .375s. They hit remarkably hard from the muzzle to further than a person really ought to shoot.

    I remember my first outing with my .375- I bounced a bowling pin over the 100yd backstop. Don't know why- but that left me pretty darn impressed.

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