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Thread: Lanyards?

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    Member PMFB-RN's Avatar
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    Default Lanyards?

    When I carried an M9 in the army we all had lanyards attached to them and to us. I really liked the idea, even though at first I wasn't too sure. I notice that civilian pistols don't come with lanyard rings like our M9s did.
    What do you guys think of the lanyard? Has anyone seen an after market lanyard ring installed on a revolver?
    I just like the idea that if I where to drop the pistol (an no I have NEVER dropped a firearm in my life, I was in the army, not the marines Just kidding) or have it knocked out of my hand all might not be lost.
    What think you guys?

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    Member JoeJ's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with a lanyard - there's some that attach to your belt and they are mainly used to retrieve your revolver - others loop around your shoulder & neck to assist in off-hand shooting, either one could be a lifesaver if you're in the wrong spot at the wrong time and the revolver comes loose from the holster or your hand. I'm normally in the wrong spot at the right time or the right spot at the wrong time.
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    Member PMFB-RN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeJ View Post
    Nothing wrong with a lanyard - there's some that attach to your belt and they are mainly used to retrieve your revolver - others loop around your shoulder & neck to assist in off-hand shooting, either one could be a lifesaver if you're in the wrong spot at the wrong time and the revolver comes loose from the holster or your hand. I'm normally in the wrong spot at the right time or the right spot at the wrong time.
    *** Where did you get the ring you have on that revolver and who installed it for you?

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    Member JoeJ's Avatar
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    I would say I was rather fortunate and purchased the revolver that way. The previous owner had the revolver, a model 25-2 modified by Hamilton Bowen to 45 Colt which included having the trigger & hammer narrowed, new cylinder, barrel, action job, lanyard ring and Bowenís front sight. Bowen sells lanyard rings & studs for $50.00
    http://www.bowenclassicarms.com/Parts_Lanyard.htm

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I happen to be a fan of lanyards...after watching my Glock bounce a long way down a scree slope after wiggling loose from the holster.

    You could check Brownells or Midway USA for aftermarket lanyard rings.

    Any competent gunsmith should be able to install one without too much difficulty.

  6. #6

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    I'll go the other way. I despise lanyards in the brush country I frequent. I love good holsters, but the lanyards stay home.

  7. #7

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    Full Flap Holsters for me. Never had need for a lanyard. Well maybe for a whisle.

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PMFB-RN View Post
    *** Where did you get the ring you have on that revolver and who installed it for you?
    If Joe does not answer you Emily I found one a while ago at Bowen Classic arms. I was going to have some work done and have the ring installed then. I was considering it when I used a different style tactical holster for the Redhawk. Now with the guides model I don't need it since the gun does not fall out of it.

    Uncle Mikes used to make lanyard rings but they don't appear to anymore. You may still find one on a rack in a store gathering dust.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I'll go the other way. I despise lanyards in the brush country I frequent. I love good holsters, but the lanyards stay home.
    I agree with you. A lanyard would create huge problems for me.

    I say, get a good holster, and skip the gimmicks.

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    Member JoeJ's Avatar
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    I wouldnít call the lanyard a gimmick, as itís just another option for the person carrying a revolver/pistol. Itís a fair tool to take the place of a ďpoorĒ rest in off-hand long range shooting and of course the main reason for it is revolver retention. Iíve heard of people losing revolvers while on a snowmobile, getting out of a canoe and even on horseback. I donít know why the revolver came out of their holster but Iím sure it was one big disappointment when they found it missing. I would think if youíre very active while carrying a revolver, a lanyard would be a good thing Ė maybe not for all, as we all see ourselves a little different Ė Iíll be ****ed if Iíll ever wear shorts and I donít care if itís 140* in the shade Ė so Iím sure thereís folks out there that wouldnít be caught dead using a lanyard Ė different strokes for different folks. Iíve never used one in very thick brush but I donít see it as a problem because you can keep the cord out of the way of most anything.

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    Member PMFB-RN's Avatar
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    Lanyards don't take the place of a good holster. I didn't mean use them instead of a holder but in addition to.
    Thanks for everybodies thoughts and links.

  12. #12

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    Good for boating..I have a friend that really likes his...I don't use one..never have ...seem that it would just be one more piece of gear to hang up..I like to bushwhack

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oneriver View Post
    Good for boating..I have a friend that really likes his...I don't use one..never have ...seem that it would just be one more piece of gear to hang up..I like to bushwhack

    Ditto on the boating... I absolutely despise lanyards except when halibut fishing... got a little saturday night special .25 which works great for popping the big ones... have a lanyard on that since the hands are always slimy, and the boats' a rocking (and 2 or 3 "helpers" who always get in the way )

    Even when I was in the Army, we (helicopter crew chiefs) would lose the "directed" lanyards since they always caught up on stuff when you're moving around in tight quarters.

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    Gotta be careful with the lanyards too. I've heard of people drowning when their lanyard snagged as their boat/helicopter/HMMWV/whatever sank. I have no idea if that's true, but something to think about. Supposedly the new ones by Blackhawk and the like are designed to prevent this.

    I think the Army is the only service that still uses them. Possibly left over from the horseback Cavalry days??? The only time us Air Force types use them is when we are "recruited" to play Army--Joint Expeditionary Taskings as they're called.

    One other thing to think about is that most lanyards are noisy, since they connect using metal fasteners. But again, I think Blackhawk corrected this--no metal fastener.

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    Member akhunter3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c04hoosier View Post
    Gotta be careful with the lanyards too. I've heard of people drowning when their lanyard snagged as their boat/helicopter/HMMWV/whatever sank. I have no idea if that's true, but something to think about. Supposedly the new ones by Blackhawk and the like are designed to prevent this.

    I think the Army is the only service that still uses them. Possibly left over from the horseback Cavalry days??? The only time us Air Force types use them is when we are "recruited" to play Army--Joint Expeditionary Taskings as they're called.

    One other thing to think about is that most lanyards are noisy, since they connect using metal fasteners. But again, I think Blackhawk corrected this--no metal fastener.
    I believe the Corps. still uses them as well. I know we did during the beginning of OIF.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Akheloce View Post
    Even when I was in the Army, we (helicopter crew chiefs) would lose the "directed" lanyards since they always caught up on stuff when you're moving around in tight quarters.
    After I got snagged in a vehicle during OEF, I ditched the lanyard for my M9 as well.

    For civilian carry I'd suggest getting a good retention holster instead.

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    In my opinion, I do offer freely with a rather extensive array of handgun carry experience, I believe a lanyard can have great benefit. Generally, for social carry situations it is an abomination. However in the rough back country where the rougher elements is not the common ne'er-do-well but a quick moving brute with tooth and claw, they can be a true life saver. When crossing streams or rivers, riding on ATV or horseback, or climbing, one can be come separated from the sidearm do to a fall or other mishap. Even the best made and fitted holster can loose its grip when dunked in the river or deposited in the rocks by an anxious horse. Also don't forget being hit like a freight train by a fast moving fury friend while the pistol is in hand.

    With the lanyard you can have full immediate access to the gun, no flap or retainer strap to undo, and still retain it if the canoe tips over when you stand to shoot. (I know, a dumb thing to do but, all went well) To keep the dangling lanyard from snagging brush and limbs I stuff it in a pocket or fold it and tuck under a belt. A firm grip and quick pull is all that is needed to extend the gun for presentation. This of course should be practiced with full follow through and and shots on target. I have lanyards on several of my outdoor handguns and find them a workable solution in certain situations.
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