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Thread: Any opinions on a smaller dog

  1. #1
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    Default Any opinions on a smaller dog

    Last kid leaves the nest this year and my lab/chessie just turned 13 and most of her hunting is in her dreams. Even though I think labs are the best dogs ever my wife wants something smaller/easier to travel with. I would like something for upland birds as we will be traveling down south in the dark of winter and still wanna have some fun. Thinking about a Novia Scotia tolling retriever but have never met one. Any one got any ideas? Mostly want it for companionship and retrieving but pointing would be a nice bonus. If I find one under 35 lbs that doesn't love every puddle in the state I won't be living in the dog house like if I got another lab.

  2. #2
    Member lynch's Avatar
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    Default Little dog.

    I got an English Cocker because I needed something small where I live. They are kinda like a small Springer and there are many good field lines available. They are mostly an upland flushing dog but I do some early season duck hunting with mine as well. They average under 35#. If you are interested in checking mine out just to see what they are like give me a pm. I live in Fairbanks but am in Anchorage for a couple of days right now.
    "Bark,bark,bark,sniff,sniff,bark,and bark" - Lynchs Blue Roan Lynch E.C.K.

  3. #3

    Default Yep...

    If I required a smaller dog, I would have one just like Lynch. He has got to be the coolest dog ever! A great working dog in a tiny package.
    "It's the journey that's important, with experience and knowledge to be gained along the way, in the company of our faithful dogs and our good friends."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  4. #4
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Boykin or American Water Spaniel should be looked into.

    All the springers we had as kids were great dogs, but none of them were smaller than 45 pounds.

  5. #5
    Member Burke's Avatar
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    Default pointer/flusher/or retriever

    You mentioned pointing to be a plus...although I believe you can train any dog to point, I also believe in getting a dog that is bred to point rather than creating something.
    If that is the case you can look at some of the smaller versatile breeds that have the pointing in them already. The Small Munsterlander, the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon, German Wirehaired Pointer are a few breeds that are smaller and are used for upland birds as well as waterfowl. The Brittany is smaller too, but not used as commonly for waterfowl, but I have seen Britts do waterfowl too. These dogs are known as versatile due tot he fact that they can do all kinds of game and are typically quality retrievers too. There are other smaller breeds that would do both pointing upland and waterfowl. The Nova Scotia Duck Trolling is not to my knowledge a pointing type dog.

    Another thing to consider is just looking for breeders who have hunting stock specifically and exclusively. Many breeders look for the larger end of the breed size. An example I use is the Chessie. When I was looking for one I had guys tell me how proud and excited they were to offer a 120 pound Chessie stud and an 80 or 90 pound b****. I immediately said no thanks. That is too big and well over the breed standard (not that the standard makes it right).
    My male Chessie in his prime was between 70 and 75 pounds. He could do anything the 100 pounder could do in the field and is still working in the field at 11 1/2 years old despite missing an eye to cancer and losing his hearing. My Weimaraner was a similar situation. I found a breeder for both who breed to the smaller, more huntable size. Some breeders even push the weight limits for labs. I have seen some mighty good hunting labs who only weighed in the 50s.

    I also think if you want a flushing dog then the spaniels are wonderful and there are several to choose from. If I were to get a spaniel I would really consider the Boykin, the Cocker or a Field Spaniel (it is a specific breed of spaniel not as well known or available). All can be used for upland birds and waterfowl.

    Take your time read, research and meet different breeds if you can. If you want contacts of dog owners with some of these different breeds, let me know. There are a lot of great dogs out there.
    Last edited by Burke; 03-12-2010 at 11:08. Reason: fix/add

  6. #6
    Member Huntress's Avatar
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    Default

    Another option is to attend a dog show. Look for the sporting group, after the all breed shows. If nothing else if a breed catches your eye you can always make contact with breeders of the breed that you are interested in. You can ask the breeder questions about the breed, have hands on experience with as many dogs as your little heart desires.....Go from there and then find yourself a breeder who breeds for the desired traits you are looking for.
    March 27 and 28 there is a show in Anchorage located at the Egan Center.
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  7. #7
    Member captaindd's Avatar
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    Default Boykin

    I have a female Boykin and she is about 55 pounds. Her attiude is that of a Chessy which means she will fight with other dogs. As far as hunting goes she loves the water and retriving. I had a problem when we first got her as she would attack and bite my other two female dogs which are Chessy's. The fighting stopped when the youngest Chessy decided she would not take it any more and bet the Boykin up pretty bad. Now every thing is Ok the Boykin nows her place. She still will attack my male yellow lab which weights 170 pounds but he just backs off and does not fight back.

  8. #8
    Member tjm's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by captaindd View Post
    my male yellow lab which weights 170 pounds
    holy cr@p! ...170lb lab?!....I'd love to see a pic of your pup...
    ------------------------------------------------
    pull my finger....

  9. #9
    Member Burke's Avatar
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    Default boykin?

    captaindd
    I have known several Boykins in the past. One guy I knew had them for years before they were recognized as a breed. He always has 3 to 5 dogs at a time. Great upland dogs! He loved to hunt quail with them...as well as pheasants and everything in between.
    Anyhow, he never had one that was more than 35 pounds (approx). Yours being 55 seems pretty large for a Boykin. Does your breeder normally produce them that large? Or is yours above average? Just curious....

  10. #10
    Member lynch's Avatar
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    Default Concur

    I have to agree about the Boykins as well. The few I have seen in the field have all been great, and they are about the right size for adqgrizz as well.
    "Bark,bark,bark,sniff,sniff,bark,and bark" - Lynchs Blue Roan Lynch E.C.K.

  11. #11
    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    Sticking with labs here. Last two dogs I have had have been the runt of the liter. Em, who was one pass shy of MH at under 24 months, and had to wait til the following season to get her MH was a little rocket. She was only about 70 lbs and a great working dog. Only problem I had is that she spent most of her life with a pro, and worked better for him then for me. My bad for not doing more of the work myself and have more respect from her. I eventually sold her back to the breeder/pro who knew her well and has plans of making her into a FC. I kept one pup from her, who also was the runt, now at 16 mos, weighs in at 63 lbs, and is a fetching fool. Will be going into serous training with her as the spring comes, plan or running her in Derby this summer (hope we have enough young dogs to hold it). Biggest advantage of a small dog THEY EAT LESS FOOD. Bud

  12. #12
    Member Burke's Avatar
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    Talking

    akblackdawg....and that means less POOP!

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