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Thread: Grandad's guns

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    Member The Kid's Avatar
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    Default Grandad's guns

    While reading the thread below by WinMag, I got to thinking about my Grandad's guns and the times I have gotten to shoot or hunt with them and how much those memories mean to me.

    I shot my first two deer with my Great Grandad Louis' Remington 760 in 6mm. He was in his late eighties by this time and no longer able to hunt, but boy ole boy did his eyes light up when I would recount the tale of the buck I shot with his rifle. And the look on his face when I presented him with a pack of steaks from each of my harvests. That rifle is long gone now, some other less appreciative grandson got it when he passed, and Lord knows where it is now, I hope my cousin still has it.

    So what did your Grandad or Grandmother hunt with, do you have it now, have you ever gotten the opportunity to hunt with it, and so on.

    Lets here some stories guys, I love oldtimers and old tales, heck I think next year I'm gonna do a retro only hunt, buy me a nother 35 Remington Marlin to take along, and nothing that wasn't invented before 1920 is allowed. That is provided I get a new wool mackinaw to wear by then, red and black plaid of course.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Kid View Post

    Lets here some stories guys, I love oldtimers and old tales, heck I think next year I'm gonna do a retro only hunt, buy me a nother 35 Remington Marlin to take along, and nothing that wasn't invented before 1920 is allowed. That is provided I get a new wool mackinaw to wear by then, red and black plaid of course.
    Now yer talkin! Are traditional muzzleloaders on your list?

    I'm the proud owner of a 30-40 Krag that's been in the family close to 100 years and a 12 gauge double that's not much younger. I've also got my dad's Colt 45 SA and leather that he carried as a deputy sheriff in the Southwest in the 1950's. All have taken game in Alaska in my hands.

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    Member jay51's Avatar
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    I learned to hunt Hares with my Grandmother as a kid, and her old Savage pump 22lr still takes a trip out of the safe every fall on a clear day to bag a Hare or Two. Great-Grandpa's old Model 70 30-06 hasn't taken an animal in my hands yet, but hopefully that will change this moose-season if we get some nice weather, I just can't stand to take those blue-steel guns out in bad weather with the sentimental value they carry to me. I also hope to pry Great Grandad's 1892 in 32WCF out of my Dad's hands long enough to bag another rabbit or two this year.

    I love these old guns and the memories they carry with them, I would also love to get out and spend some time in the woods with my father and the family heirlooms to create some more memories. Great Thread.
    -J

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Now yer talkin! Are traditional muzzleloaders on your list?

    I'm the proud owner of a 30-40 Krag that's been in the family close to 100 years and a 12 gauge double that's not much younger. I've also got my dad's Colt 45 SA and leather that he carried as a deputy sheriff in the Southwest in the 1950's. All have taken game in Alaska in my hands.
    Sure they are, I've never took cotton to any of the new inlines and always bought and hunted with sidehammer guns with wood stocks and often roundballs. Same with bowhunting, never liked wheels on my bows, and love to shoot cedar shafts with old style broadheads. I've taken deer with Bear Razorheads and Zwickey Eskimos, now I'm using an old Howard Hill style on my Port Orfords.

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    Thumbs up yes sir...

    Grandpa's and more...

    I don't know how old I was but I'll never forget shooting grandpa's 38 cal pistol into the big oak tree in southern Illinois... I later learned it was a S&W Victory model that was my great grandpa's. That tree took a lot of lead over the years and was finally cut down about 10 years ago... When grandpa passed a few years back we spent three days burning the last of that tree during a round the clock vigil... There were a lot of stories and more than a fair share of beverages toasted during those three days...

    After shooting grandpa's pistol I was hooked.... Next came my first own BB gun. Ya it was sort of a "Christmas Story" scene when I got that thing. I'll never forget dad helping me open it up and the talk we had. As we talked about rules and responsibility dad promised me he'd always support and defend me as long as I never lied to him. I'll never forget that conversation. I was a 3rd grader and I remember like it was yesterday... I even recall him deciding that he would demonstrate the BB gun's ability by shooting a ball off the tree (just this once). AS he steadied his aim I pointed out the picture window behind the tree... He smiled and said "I was just testing ya"...

    When I turned 11 my grandpa bought me a stevens .410 shotgun and a savage .20 gauge. I was in heaven. I'll never forget laying inside my parent's bedroom with my shotgun out the window waiting for a skunk to come by... That was my first legitimate kill. Dad and I opened up on that poor skunk w/ all four barrels...

    When I was in the 6th grade I bought my first gun. I had earned enough selling calves at the sale barn to pay $79 dollars for a ruger 10/22. I bought it at our local hardware store and remember the owner giving me a box of 22 shells for free. I also remember he asked if I was a marine after noticing the marine corps buckle on my belt. NO... I was not a marine but my grandpa was... And I wore that buckle with pride.

    I also remember as a 7th grader working all summer to earn $300 to buy a S&W model 66 .357. I kept in dad's closet but was allowed to get it down w/ permission. It was my pride and joy. I polished it to near mirror like finish w/ a cotton cloth and an old tube of flitz...

    When I turned 18 I started work for our local sheriff's department. I was a badge wearing, gun toting corrections officer. The funny part was I had to take my mom to the local walmart to purchase my ammo because I was not old enough to by bullets for the gun I carried on my hip. She still laughs about that one...

    I sold most of those guns some years later to get enough money to come to Alaska. I regret ever selling them but I don't regret coming to Alaska. There are some things that are just worth the sacrifice.

    Guns are tools but the memories behind them could fill pages...

    Great thread!!!

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Got a mess of guns from Dad the 2 that mean the most are:
    His 1909 made model 94 in 30wcf that lived as hard a life on his saddle as Dad did.
    And his blown to splinters M1 Garand that should have killed him but just made his ears ring badly the rest of his life . . . he had muffs on but it blew them off.

    From Grandpa I got just two guns:
    His 1919 made model 94 30wcf that lived on his saddle from new till he died in 1976.
    And the gun that means the very most to me of any gun in the world, a ratty Mossberg model 60 410 bolt action shotgun worth maybe $60 at most. Grandpa used it to keep birds out of his peach, apple, and pear trees. I spent my late summer evenings from about age 6 sitting in the orchard with Grandpa smoking Lucky Strikes, dipping Copenhagen, sipping peach brandy, telling tall tales, and popping birds. There is not enough money in the world to buy that gun from me!!!
    Andy
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    Smile

    I have an old 300 savage that was my grandpa's, took my first white tail 35 years ago with it. was just thinking the other day how cool would it be to take a black bear with it this spring. I'm betting he will be looking down smiling

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    I love tales of old guns and the old folks who cared enough about us to leave them behind.

    I've got my grandfather's old 336 in 30WCF, his M12 Winchester, his Marlin 22 and his M37 Winchester... they're among my more treasured possesions. I started hunting with these guns and still do to a lesser extent today.

    They've accounted for my first critter of any kind prior to coming to AK.
    I still enjoy getting them out of the house for a walk in the woods from time to time.

  9. #9

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    I have all my Grandparent's rifles.

    My Grandmothers win.mod. 65 .218 bee. She shot this monster buck with the bee while preparing supper at camp. By the way that's a 36" yard stick.



    I shot my first buck with the bee. I was seven years old. Only supposed to be hunting rabbits at the time. That was the first and only time that I ever heard my Granddad scream.

    Her win. mod. 94 .32 spec. I saw her shoot a cow elk on a dead run straight at her with her 32.

    Granddads win. mod. 95 30-40 krag. He shot most of his deer while they were laying down resting or sleeping. I see most of my deer from their back side. Running away.

    And my favorite is the Rem. mod. 12 .22 pump. I can't remember how many hours that I spent hunting cotton tails, chuckers and quail.

  10. #10

    Default Grandad's guns

    Good post Both Grandads hunted deer with lever actions. Paternal Grandad used a Marlin 32-40 (Model 1893 would be my best guess), while Maternal Grandad used a Winchester 94 in 38-55. Never had a chance to hunt with them (Grandad's or their rifles),and unfortunately both rifles have gone the way of history. They also hunted other game with .22s and shotguns. Some years ago I went out and bought a Model 1894 Winchester in 38-55, which is now well over a hundred years old--just 'cause Grandad had one! My favorite rifle is a 100 year old Remington Model 8, in .35 Rem.--which I hunt with every year.

  11. #11

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    I currently have two guns that were gandpa's. One is a single shot break action 410-45 (thats what it says on the barrel but never shot any 45's in it). It is chambered for 2 1/2" shells only. I once killed my limit of 3 rooster pheasants with that gun when 14 years old.

    I also have grandpa's remington 514 22. I can remember as a kid when that gun was still gramps. Gma & Gpa lived on a farm in north central Iowa about 10 miles from Charles City where I grew up. In the fall, when I was in jr high I would get on my bike as soon as school was out friday afternoon and peddle the 10 miles to their house. The next morning I would be sitting in the big woods a half hour before daylight with the 514 waiting for the squirrels to wake up. Grandma often packed me a lunch as she knew I wasn't coming back to the house until I had my limit of 6 squirrels or it was dark which ever happened first. I also remember the stiff neck that I would get from looking up in the trees all day! This 514 went missing for many years as my dip stick uncle sold it when grandpa died. I pleaded with the guy that bought it to sell it to me but he declined. This guy died a couple of years ago and his son intended to keep it as a keep sake. However money talks and it did that day. Who in their right mind would give $250 for a Remington 514? He didn't know it but I would have given him 4 times that much if he would have held out.

  12. #12

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    My dad's father did not own any guns. He was a city man from Philadelphia. My mom's dad only ever owned one gun that I know of. It was a double barrel shotgun that he used to hunt rabbits, pheasant and squirrels with. I used it once when I first started hunting. He is dead now and his son, my uncle, now owns it.

    -Mark

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by m88.358win View Post
    I have all my Grandparent's rifles.

    My Grandmothers win.mod. 65 .218 bee. She shot this monster buck with the bee while preparing supper at camp. By the way that's a 36" yard stick.



    I shot my first buck with the bee. I was seven years old. Only supposed to be hunting rabbits at the time. That was the first and only time that I ever heard my Granddad scream.

    Her win. mod. 94 .32 spec. I saw her shoot a cow elk on a dead run straight at her with her 32.

    Granddads win. mod. 95 30-40 krag. He shot most of his deer while they were laying down resting or sleeping. I see most of my deer from their back side. Running away.

    And my favorite is the Rem. mod. 12 .22 pump. I can't remember how many hours that I spent hunting cotton tails, chuckers and quail.
    Cool story and a great rack. What state was that buck shot in? It looks like an Idaho or Wyoming buck.

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Default Nice Thread Kid

    My Grandparents didn't hunt, father didn't either after WW2 - he was one of the "Band of Brothers" pinned at the Battle of the Bulge for months. Dad would not say much about the war - only that he had seen enough death. After he died I learned he had several medals and had helped save many men on both sides. He spent months in recovery from wounds also.
    Anyway, he would take me hunting as a kid and for that I am forever grateful. I have a 26 yr old son that loves to hunt with me yet when I stop someday I am not sure he would continue. Funny how I would have loved to have been in a traditional hunting family and cherished the hand me downs, I have done all I can to instill hunting in my son and yes he enjoys it yet does not have the true love many of us on here feel.
    Life can be a mystery for sure, perhaps my 2 grandsons will cherish the old mans guns someday???

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey View Post
    My Grandparents didn't hunt, father didn't either after WW2 - he was one of the "Band of Brothers" pinned at the Battle of the Bulge for months. Dad would not say much about the war - only that he had seen enough death. After he died I learned he had several medals and had helped save many men on both sides. He spent months in recovery from wounds also.
    Anyway, he would take me hunting as a kid and for that I am forever grateful. I have a 26 yr old son that loves to hunt with me yet when I stop someday I am not sure he would continue. Funny how I would have loved to have been in a traditional hunting family and cherished the hand me downs, I have done all I can to instill hunting in my son and yes he enjoys it yet does not have the true love many of us on here feel.

    Life can be a mystery for sure, perhaps my 2 grandsons will cherish the old mans guns someday???

    Same here. My Father was was in the 5th marine division 1/28th on Iwo Jima. The flag setters. He also would never talk about the war and my family only found out where he was and what he did after his death.
    He did like to hunt and fish but Granddad was the skilled hunter.

    Our Father's, Sons, Brothers, Sisters and Mothers made a great sacrifices for our freedoms. God bless.

    MontanaRifleman,
    That buck was shot in western Colorado.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    My Dad saw action on most of the island in the pacific. He was wounded in the butt on Iwo with the 5th Maries, shot a Jap in a hide hole and pushed by only to have another Jap pop up the same hole behind him. Then he was shot to pieces on Okinawa with the 1st Maries, spent 7 months in a full body cast, lost use of his left hand and left lung for life, and 2 inches of his right femur. He loved hunting, hated killing but did it as a necessary part of hunting. He usually had one of us boys put down any egg sucking dogs, kill the critters we butchered and things like that. He would only talk about the war to his sons, only late at night one on one, usually while sharing some beers, and never with much detail about bloody things he had to do. These talks were usually a lot like the scene in Jaws where the guy tells his story of the sinking of the Indianapolis. Dad was a BAR man and I was lucky enough to hunt with Dad and his ammo man from Okinawa as they talked about the good stuff and some of the bad. I have all 3 of Dad’s purple hearts.

    I’m very lucky to have had him for my father. We must never forget that we are all here only because of what such men endured and are enduring even today!
    Andy
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    Quote Originally Posted by m88.358win View Post
    Same here. My Father was was in the 5th marine division 1/28th on Iwo Jima. The flag setters. He also would never talk about the war and my family only found out where he was and what he did after his death.
    He did like to hunt and fish but Granddad was the skilled hunter.

    Our Father's, Sons, Brothers, Sisters and Mothers made a great sacrifices for our freedoms. God bless.

    MontanaRifleman,
    That buck was shot in western Colorado.
    That is very cool 358Win! I just met a survivor of Iwo Jima in the post office last Tuesday and i post the experience in the GD forum. It was an honour and a thrill to meet and talk with him.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...t=74758&page=2

    CO has some real nice bucks too. Would love to get one like that someday, but not likely in MT.

    -Mark

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    My Dad saw action on most of the island in the pacific. He was wounded in the butt on Iwo with the 5th Maries, shot a Jap in a hide hole and pushed by only to have another Jap pop up the same hole behind him. Then he was shot to pieces on Okinawa with the 1st Maries, spent 7 months in a full body cast, lost use of his left hand and left lung for life, and 2 inches of his right femur. He loved hunting, hated killing but did it as a necessary part of hunting. He usually had one of us boys put down any egg sucking dogs, kill the critters we butchered and things like that. He would only talk about the war to his sons, only late at night one on one, usually while sharing some beers, and never with much detail about bloody things he had to do. These talks were usually a lot like the scene in Jaws where the guy tells his story of the sinking of the Indianapolis. Dad was a BAR man and I was lucky enough to hunt with Dad and his ammo man from Okinawa as they talked about the good stuff and some of the bad. I have all 3 of Dadís purple hearts.

    Iím very lucky to have had him for my father. We must never forget that we are all here only because of what such men endured and are enduring even today!
    Hats off to your dad AD. Thanks for sharing the story.

    -Mark

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    I have a Savage "1899"(30/30) that belonged to my father in law. He was a rancher/cowboy is S/E Oregon. The rifle was made in 1924. Theres almost no blueing left on it or any finnish left on the Stock. It was carried in a rifle scabard on the saddle all the time. It has killed an unknown count of Yotes, more deer than most people have seen, A lot of bear, and a bunch of Mt. lions. Remember the stories he told about living on the range and only having the 30/30 for company. 5 yrs ago he left the rifle with me to Clean and take care of for him. He passed on 3 yrs ago. This rifle will go on to the daughter when Iam gone and on to the grand daughter in time.

    Gun Runner

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    That is very cool 358Win! I just met a survivor of Iwo Jima in the post office last Tuesday and i post the experience in the GD forum. It was an honour and a thrill to meet and talk with him.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...t=74758&page=2

    CO has some real nice bucks too. Would love to get one like that someday, but not likely in MT.

    -Mark
    Sorry to highjack this thread but...........

    This is a story that I posted in another forum:

    My father passed away Sunday November 6, 2005. Until his death my family and I never had a clue of what he did during WW-2, he would not talk about it and we would not ask. It wasnít until after reading his military medical records that we found out He was a WW-2 war veteran who served with the U.S Marine Corps 5TH Division 28TH Marines. The Same Marines who were in the first wave of combat at the island known as Iwo Jima and the same that climbed Mount Suribachi to place the now infamous American Flag.
    He enlisted in the service at the age of 17. He completed basic training at Sa Diego CA prior to serving throughout the South Pacific with the Marines. He was in actual combat on a number of islands, especially Iwo Jima. He suffered severe injuries from a mine explosion and major head and leg lacerations from a mortar blast. The medical records also stated that my father was very reluctant to talk about specific events which were traumatic and would say that "it was all the same."
    In one event he was sent with six other men to blow up a cave. One of the first guys who went into the cave stepped on a mine. My father who was at the mouth of the cave was blown 50 feet out. No one survived except my father and another man whose legs were blown off. He was then requested to report aboard a hospital ship but felt he did not want to leave his outfit so continued fighting. Another experience was when he and another Marine were hiding behind a large rock he told the other man not to stick his head out from behind the rock. The other man did as my father said for a while but curiosity got the better of him, he stuck his head out, and was shot through both sides of the mouth. My father had to drag the wounded Marine back through a withering hail of machine gun fire to get medical help. In another event, Japan soldiers dressed in Marine clothing slipped into his camp and slit the throats of about 100 fellow Marines.
    After returning home from the war Doctors evaluating him think that this was only a small fraction of what
    really happened. My father was exposed to 33 straight days of combat. He was later administered the Mississippi Scale for Combat-related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, the Combat Exposure Scale. He scored "Heavy" (most extreme) level of combat exposure. My father suffered the rest of his life not telling of his never ending image of the war and all of its horrific carnage.
    While planning his funeral I had asked the funeral director for full military burial honors but was informed that due to the fact there was a Veterans Day parade on the same day of his burial he would only be able to get flag folders. I was very upset so I sent a similar letter like this to a news paper and handed a copy to the local Marine recruiting station and asked both if they could help with getting the honors burial. That same day a reporter from the news paper wanted an interview with me, he placed the story in the paper the next day. I then got a call from a Marine Captain, he told me not to worry and that Marines always take care of their own.
    The day of the funeral, there were people lined up trying to get in the funeral home. People that had read the news paper article came out in force to honor my Father. There was young and old, one old guy said that he was a troop transporter boatman in the same battle. Arriving at the cemetery, I couldnít believe my eyes, there were Marines in their dress blues lined on both sides of the road, there were so many I could not count them all. They had flown and driven in from other towns from varies states around the country. They played taps and gave a firing of three volley shots from seven soldiers then finally the flag folding ceremony.
    Iím sure that there are countless never heard of stories of courage and valor from our brave soldiers and veterans, this is one of them.

    After doing an internet search I managed to find a couple pictures of him.




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