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  1. #1
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    Thumbs up river adv

    I'm an Italian canoeist; next August with my son Cesare (canoeist,20 years old) would like descend a big river in Alaska or BC during 10 days apx. Class 3. May be alone or with local people. Have you some idea or some advice?

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    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    Default Options

    If I were king for a day I would suggest looking at the Dease River in BC on section Class II / III depending on the water level all the fishing with none of the people or silt. Weather is mostly stable and the system has no motor traffic.

    If I were looking in to AK for a 8-10 day large River the Mighty Yukon has access and is wild. 157 miles from Eagle to Circle. Couple of more options would be Beaver Creek just North of Fairbanks and anything within the 40 mile drainage.

    Hope you find what your looking for!

    Best Wishes

    Blue Moose

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    Default Research...

    "Alaskan solitude come at a price..."
    - Karen Jettmar

    There are a number of sources of excellent information for your planning. These forums will certainly be one - many experienced rafters/canoers/kayakers frequently add to the discussions here, educating us all. But if I could only have one book to read in preparation for such a trip, I'd select Karen Jettmar's, The Alaska River Guide, 3rd ed, which contains the quote above from the chapter, "The Special Challenges of Alaska". Then I'd read it well.

    On river ratings, she reminds us that rivers are dynamic, influenced by many factors, adding: "As a rule of thumb, many people rate Alaskan rivers an extra class higher...to factor in the coldness and remoteness of the river".

    If this is a first trip, plan carefully. A guided or outfitter-assisted trip is the best bet for many people. Difficulties with access, issues with the remoteness, unpredictability of the weather or transportation can complicate the best laid plans. River ratings can change dramatically within days of heavy rains or sunny weather. On early or late season floats, ice adds to cold water considerations; aufeis and floating ice.

    She also has good early chapters on Safety and "Respecting the Land and Its Inhabitants", which seem essential topics to include in planning. Terrific resource.

    Have a great trip.

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    First of all, welcome to the forum.


    You need to give more info on the goals of your trip to get good info. If you would, answer the below questions.

    The only "canoe" you will use is a pack canoe like the Ally. I have one and use on remote floats. Great canoes, but not something I personally would use on class III. For inflattable "canoes" like the SOARs, that is a different matter.

    When you say "remote" does that mean away from town, but seeing some people on a daily basis. Does it mean seeing another group on the river every 2-3 days is acceptable. or does it mean you don't want to see anyone for a week or more at a time.

    As mentioned before me, solitude will cost you a bit. You can expect to put you and your son and all gear for a 10-14 day float trip in one flight. That flight, round trip, with all your gear, will be anywhere from $1,500 to $3,500 depending on the river you choose. Give some suggestion to your budget if that is a restraint.

    Is your trip timing flexible or is August the time you must take the trip. Your options will vary some depending on when you take the trip. Generally speaking, the floats in Alaska I have done or have planned are from mid June to mid Sept. Trip timing is crucial though on some of these rivers. Especially if fishing is a priority.

    Any particular part of the state you want to see. SW Alaska, arctic NW (Noatak Preserve), north central arctic (Gates of the Arctic NP), north east arctic (ANWR), etc...

    Also, you mention "class three". Is that to suggest you want some whitewater, a goal of the trip perhaps. Or does that mean that anything under class III is of interest.

    Lastly, are your goals fishing, scenery, solitude, wildlife, hiking, etc.. There is often a trade off on some of these when picking a river.


    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Some reference material-

    In addition to Karen's wonderful book, The Alaska River Guide, you might also have a look at MacLean's "Paddling the Yukon River and it's Tributaries". The same author also wrote "Paddling Alaska", a good general overview that you might find useful. We have over 365,000 miles of rivers up here, so you need to focus your search for our folks to be able to provide detailed assistance.

    You mentioned a big river, but there are many others that would fit your criteria, I think. Could you be more specific as to what you're looking for?

    Thanks,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
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    Dear friends, thank you for your replyes!

    I'll try to give you some info about my travel idea.

    I dream to visit and know a particular area of the country (Alaska or BC, maybe) descending a whitewater river.

    I love nature (mountains, rivers, lakes, ices) and local people connections.
    The trip goals are scenery, wildlife, local landscape (maybe ices, mountains, ect) but, sure, contacts with local people to know their wisdom, habits, uses...

    I'm a C1 and C2 canoist and I practice canoe in a small part (slalom field) of Brenta River near Valstagna Italy (fiume Brenta a Valstagna). My canoe is "Vajda Lizard". But I don't want to descend American or Canadian rivers by canoe as mine! I'll prefer an inflattable canoe like the Soars,maybe! Mainly to carry our gears!

    My suggest is to come down a class 3 whitewater river in which seeing groups of people every one two days is acceptable.

    My budget may be 1500 3000$, depending on the chosen river.

    My trip timing is not flexible: I would like travel in the time from 25 July to 15 August apx

    Good bye.
    Henry

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    I would contact Kirk Sweetsir at Yukon Air in Ft. Yukon. Ask him about floating the Kongakut or Hula Hula in NE arctic Alaska during your timeframe. I have the Kongakut planned out, but for trip timing of mid June. He will likely pick you up in Arctic Village. If so, you would fly commercial airliner to Fairbanks, then take a Wright Air flight from Fairbanks to Arctic Village. He would pick you up there and fly you to either of these rivers. Float, hike, explore nature, etc.. for two weeks, get picked up and brought back. A trip I doubt you would forget anytime soon. For now, read up on these two rivers and see if one of them catches your attention.

    http://www.yukonair.com/

    http://www.wrightair.net/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/palojon...7601663815539/

    Guide service below. Some insights on the river....
    http://www.equinoxexpeditions.com/river_kong2.php

    These guys made a river journal and dvd set of the Kongakut...
    http://www.amazon.com/Kongakut-River.../dp/B001UKZJK0

    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    greetings henry,
    I would suggest a great trip down the world-famous Copper River... it meets your criteria and would be a lovely introduction to Alaska for you and your son... without the complicated logistics and expense of float planes. You could either put-in on the Little Nelchina, Tazlina, or on the McCarthy/Chitna system... either way, you would take the Copper all the way to the saltwater in Cordova.

  9. #9
    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    Default Copper is a Great Idea

    However instead one could start at Paxson Lake and float down to Chitna or all the way to Cordova pulling out at Chitna would save some bucks you would get to fish the Gulkana in the late summer which ia always fun decent wildlife viewing a little bit of clear water with rapids then the Grand Copper. You would meet some people up high but then only fish wheels to float around.

    Great suggestions Jocko.

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    Quote Originally Posted by henryzilio View Post
    Dear friends, thank you for your replyes!

    I'll try to give you some info about my travel idea.

    I dream to visit and know a particular area of the country (Alaska or BC, maybe) descending a whitewater river.

    I love nature (mountains, rivers, lakes, ices) and local people connections.
    The trip goals are scenery, wildlife, local landscape (maybe ices, mountains, ect) but, sure, contacts with local people to know their wisdom, habits, uses...

    I'm a C1 and C2 canoist and I practice canoe in a small part (slalom field) of Brenta River near Valstagna Italy (fiume Brenta a Valstagna). My canoe is "Vajda Lizard". But I don't want to descend American or Canadian rivers by canoe as mine! I'll prefer an inflattable canoe like the Soars,maybe! Mainly to carry our gears!

    My suggest is to come down a class 3 whitewater river in which seeing groups of people every one two days is acceptable.

    My budget may be 1500 3000$, depending on the chosen river.

    My trip timing is not flexible: I would like travel in the time from 25 July to 15 August apx

    Good bye.
    Henry
    Hello Henry,

    I see some of the suggestions...

    Couple of specifics in your posts to highlight (translate):

    1.) Many on here would not have much of a clue to the whitewater (or flatwater) C1 or C2 boats that you are accustom to using and seeing back home. These are special boats... they are not sold here in Alaska and very few are paddled in Alaska by all but experienced canoeists of this sport. Most 'sport-paddlers' (not talking multi-day freighters or float hunters) in Alaska are in polyethylene 'plastic' Kayaks with a few using plastic canoes. Inflatable rafts, catarafts, and some 'as close to rigid-like' inflatable kayaks or canoes like AIRE FORCE, LYNX or TRAVELER are more the normal for sport paddling.

    2.) Your version of Italian water park Class I-IV is good training. I will recommend that if you haven't made the 'rafting part' of the park experience with some KM of duration in class III by yourself with something in it besides paddlers like gear or simulated dead weight secured inside... you should rethink big Class III rivers in Alaska that are not controlled, without safety measures built in, and 100+ KM of wilderness with cold water/weather. I'm not saying fear this or do not go... just saying re-tool and know taking on larger rivers in Alaska of sustained multi-day Class III floating is not a water park. Good people, intel, timing and excellent equipment are your best starting places.

    Look at it this way:
    Your fine water park of say 20KM maximum trip is like resort skiing... beginner, intermediate, double diamond advanced, to ski at your own risk more extreme - ya go were you are comfortable and yes some more challenges......................

    Now go climb up & ski a big mountain back-country - have shovel, beacon, probe, know snow conditions, no Patrol, conditions change...

    You catch my drift - In Italy you have this every day in the High mountains with incredible alpine ski resorts and also extreme free-skiing and multi-day Alpine touring. There is difference

    When I look at what you seek in a trip... Class III, scenery, wildlife, local landscape, 1500 3000$... I see you on a river like Lake Creek to fly-in and have very good whitewater, 3-5 days by canoe, and ballpark $. I could also see you on Copper River tributaries into Copper River for ice, mountains, ballpark $ & more days.

    Budget would not get you to experience Arctic Rivers... yet rest of list could set you on Nigu, Kobuk, Noatak, or Hula-Hula.

    Budget would not get you to Lake Clark or Southwestern Rivers.

    Lake Creek would be a very good choice except for the # of days floating. Many of the rivers you budget for are not long in terms of KM paddling distance.

    Buying or renting a boat will cost you, fly-outs are not cheap, and certainly driving the road system isn't free... biggest hurdles (problems) with all the unrealistic suggestions you have received so far.

  11. #11
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    A few years back we canoed from McCarthy to Chitna. Folks thought we were a little crazy embarking in our tandem canoe, but it was totally doable for us. We chose this trip since it didn't require a flight!
    The town of McCarthy is an interesting place to check out as well as the Kennicott glacier.
    http://www.nps.gov/wrst/planyourvisit/river-trips.htm

    If you wanted to extend the trip, you could continue down the Copper.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cristancanoe View Post
    A few years back we canoed from McCarthy to Chitna. Folks thought we were a little crazy embarking in our tandem canoe, but it was totally doable for us. We chose this trip since it didn't require a flight!
    The town of McCarthy is an interesting place to check out as well as the Kennicott glacier.
    http://www.nps.gov/wrst/planyourvisit/river-trips.htm

    If you wanted to extend the trip, you could continue down the Copper.
    Yes - this is the tributary float trip I was thinking as well and on down the Copper for the # of days, river-side ice of glaciers... then shuttle into Cordova

    Good info for some - I run this shuttle service with inflatable boat rentals up to put in and then pick up in Whittier at the ferry terminal. This round-trip service keeps visitors or local folks from having to leave a vehicle unattended for days and logistics puts groups back to travel hub of Anchorage. Food for thought a shuttle we have on books is running $1820 starting in Anchorage to Copper Center, boat rental w/ float on Copper plus pick up in Whittier... however this is for fewer days boat rental and less mileage for shuttle than put in on Kennicott River... yet as is this comes ball-park of his budget.

    It's the number of days and length of a river that is close proximity that really come into play with this kind of budget. Rent only a car to get to the put in, and leave it for float trip, plus figure how to get back to it.... over-budget right there! Never mind the rental of a boat, food and so on. Drive to the put-ins (do no float at all) and drive back to the Yukon for example from Anchorage... in an average suv --- that's $500+ in gas alone! Fairbanks saves a bit - but still the point is the road system is rough on the wallet of a visitors that need transportation and locals that have it.

    Really, going totally independent with a rental boat... the better solution here is to do the trip mentioned above that has all on your list, do several roadside or train access shorter streams or do a trip like Lake Creek fly-in of fun whitewater water, good camping, excellent fishing, and a some groups along the trip.

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    Default Sorry B

    Not trying to rain on the subject and as always your a wealth of data and great information and anyone would be hard pressed to find your knowledge concerning AK you have done that and been there honestly no way shape or form trying to burst a bubble.

    Option Gulkana to Chitna raft / inflatable canoe rental high end from lets say Walt on the river with shuttle service. 90 per day total 9 days from Paxson down very doable $810.00 Rental car from Anch depending on who is helping you from 80 -120 bucks per day. $720.00. Shuttle round trip $300.00 local area should not run to much at I have a feeling that is high end for the area. Food etc... $500.00 top end trip is done out the door for about 2.1K and of course all is potentially negotiable depending on the business and the needs. Of course the money would flex depending on the options however basically I could see someone able to accomplish such a trip for under 2K with some home work.

    Yes I do agree depending on what locaiton, the logistics and the rental fees a very good option is as you suggested however I feel you might be painting a somewhat skewed picture of the overall cost for an Alt Trip from the road system.

    Respectfully

    BMR

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Richardson View Post

    Budget would not get you to experience Arctic Rivers

    Budget would not get you to Lake Clark or Southwestern Rivers.

    I will preface this statement with saying Brian's knowledge of floating rivers in Alaska far exceeds mine. I have referred several potential clients to Brian for this reason. With that said, I have done three remote float trips on arctic NW rivers and one in SW Alaska that you could do for around $3,000. These trips combine for 40 river days total and I have seen 6 rafts/canoes/boats. Fantastic fishing, nice scenery, easy camping for the most part, lots of wildlife, and a great deal of solitude. However, they don't offer any whitewater. The Kongakut and Hula Hula in NE Alaska exceed the cost of the rivers I mention above. I thought it best to tell you the river that would meet your stated goals and let you decide for yourself if you could afford it. This was the intention in my providing links to the bush pilot services that would take you to these rivers. Cost, value, and worth have a very subjective relationship to one another. That is a decision only you can make.


    Below are assorted pictures from some of our float trips. If any of this catches your attention, shoot me a PM. Happy to share any info I have of course.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/2114408...27567944/show/


    -Dan



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    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    You guys... no need to be complimentary, sorry, respectful and so on.

    Moose... the Gulkana would be ok and then on down the Copper... Look at the # of Days tho'! Fun little starter river at near people peak season for floaters... Why would you recommend a sort of wilderness 3 day upper 1.5 day not so wilderness flatwater lower w/ jet boat traffic roadside to someone that wants a trip on a big river for much longer. You just posted a budget here that is nearly same for less of the Alaska wilderness experience or remote adventure... the shuttle at $300 (I'll admit - that's a steel if round-trip shuttle to river from Fairbanks airport and back from the river if --- it's just a Gulkana shuttle - no deal). All this with more time and logistical planning - messing around instead of a one stop for everything, put-in drop and and return plan pick-up.

    Dan... The whitewater Arctic rivers of # days length start near the mountains... this is very expensive as you know because it starts any fly-in further away from bush-flight hubs. Now throw in the SOTAR you got from Goo (the borrowed frame and all and now new one) and accessories you have today. Now fly all that stuff up here. Dan - With boat and cargo today alone you are well past $1500-3000 without a river or way/how to get there. For example... 1 rental truck up the Dalton to run Atigun Gorge from Anchorage is 810 miles 1 way --- gas alone for 1600+ miles $$$$. Truck Rental for time is $$$$, owning or renting boat and gear or getting it here $$$$. Food (even eat only fish on the trip) license and gear $$$.

    Both your budgets either reflect in round about figuring the realistic $$$ that I'm talking, or your leaving out some essentials to # days and $$$$, or you guys are prepared to give this traveler misinformation or some free services somewhere along the course of his visit. I know you guys are trying to present options and help.

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    Default No worries

    I will admit it is not lake Creek the Chili etc... however August does see a reduction in traffic on the Gulkana System and very little jet boat traffic around Sourdough lucky to see one or two of them in August. You might find a couple of guides working trout up high but other than that not to busy.

    5 days from Paxson down to the Copper and 3-4 days down to Chitna still fits the trip minus glacier climbing. No it is not true wilderness however I must point out any place that has a Air Taxi access between Anch and Glennallen has people.

    Transportation would be from the Local area skipping Fairbanks no need to come up here to float down there. Couple of new kids on the block working the Lower Gulkana and shuttle fees are actually reasonable. From Fairbanks to and from someone like me would have to combo the trip with another to off set higher price of gas so Squarebanks is not an option to fit the budget. No miss information concerning budget just a little leg work by the requestor.

    We will I suppose have to agree to disagree on this one eh! I would till consider it an option based on a couple fo factors. August Potential for Moose, Bear, Otter, Eagle, Wolf sightings off chance Caribou. Fishing can be excellent if that option was required, couple of miles off the to beaten path with a decent strech of Class II and one section of Class III camping access is above average and once you hit the Copper stay on the Park side and you will be alone.

    I will agree Lake Creek has more to offer for fun water and the potential for viewing bears and of course has excellent fihsing as well. Logistically the trip is spot on and less work utilzing Anch and Lake Creek however not the only option.

    :-)

    Best Wishes and Best of Luck with your trip! Off to San Jose for a couple of days of coaching.

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    When I said the float trips I did could be done for around $3,000, I meant THE FLOAT TRIP. Not a matter of opinion, I have done the trips and that is what they cost. Perhaps we are working on a different set of assumptions. Lack of input from the OP has made this all to easy. I was not counting his cost to get over to Alaska, a night at the Millenenium, Alaska sweatshirt/hat, the 1964 earthquake simulation ride, travel to Dillingham/Kotz, etc.. I was talking about the actual float trip as I thought that is what he was asking.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    I know I know get on the plane already Moose.

    This is actaully a very good thread for forum members and those seeking data and or information. I will point out that Alaska Raft Connection B.R. offers a quality service and Brian your data as always is full of insight and the product lined offered with the services provided is always a top 10 percent deal. Dano as with your input I know I appreciate your input as well and you have chewed a fair amont of Alaska Dirt getting it.

    Mike if you could please expand some of your related data as well you are the man and Da Book is a great tool for those who visit this site planning any float trip should read it.

    Best Wishes and Happy Days to all on UN-FROZEN Water.

    Respectfully

    Richard Mousseau
    BMR

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    Hey Moose...

    Thanks for compliments -

    I think a great logistic plan on your Gulkana trib down Copper could be as per your suggestion --- a plane or train to Fairbanks... boat rental I thing raft also on this one) and shuttle arrangements to Paxon Lake put in by Blue Moose Rafting... combining my recommendations --- then shuttle into Cordova off Copper River by local hotel/motel/shuttle operator... Ferry to Whittier... for train or shuttle service into Anchorage for return flight home. Ties all together nicely and is full proof planning. 10 days cost will be Original Poster's higher end ballpark and give opportunities for all his adventure requests.

  20. #20
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Some ideas for our Italian friend-

    Lots of great information here already, Henry. I hope you are getting some good direction.

    I've been watching this thread and thought I'd try to address some of your questions. I'll make my comments broad enough to apply to others with similar issues and questions. Some of this won't exactly fit your situation, so take what you need and hopefully the rest will be useful to others...

    One of the difficulties I see with this is your budget, combined with the length of time, combined with your desire to only see people every two or three days. The best type of trip to offer the length of float time you want and less people is going to be a remote trip. But your budget may be too tight for that.

    Alaska has over 365,000 miles of floatable rivers to choose from, so there are lots of options. Here are some general things to consider:

    COSTS

    Your budget. You said you are planning on $1500 - $3000. Is this per-person, or both people combined? Also does this include other costs besides transportation, such as-

    • Air travel to Alaska
    • Food
    • Boat rental
    • Satellite phone rental
    • Tent and camping gear rental
    • Hotel
    • Car rental
    • Gear purchases
    • Incidentals


    There are many hidden costs like these, so it helps to get all that out in front of you in order to plan this properly. If your budget is $3000 total, combined for both people, and is intended to include all possible costs, it's going to be pretty tight. It can be done, but you will really have to watch it. From the posts so far, it looks like we're assuming that this number is the total cost including everything (hence the recommendations for road-based trips). Either way, here are the three options open to you; this will give you a basis for planning:

    THE THREE OPTIONS

    1. Fly in, fly out. Most of our rivers are not on the road system. This means that the most practical way to get there is to fly. Certainly this will get you into some of the best and most remote floats in the state. Flying can be done on your budget, but I would do it directly out of Anchorage or Fairbanks. Most of the rivers out of Anchorage can be floated in much less time than you mentioned, but they can be fun and some of them offer great opportunities for fishing or hiking. I'm thinking of rivers like the Talachulitna, Lake Creek, the Hartman / South Fork Kuskokwim, etc. Out of Fairbanks you could catch a hop on Wright's Air over to Bettles and look at the Wild River, which only requires a drop-off since you can float right to Bettles (saving you half the charter fee). But all of these rivers are going to be way at the upper end of your budget, assuming your numbers are intended to be all-inclusive.

    2. Fly in, drive out or drive in, fly out. These are rivers that have road access either at the put-in or at the take-out. Some parts of the Fortymile fit this bill, and there are others. By flying only at one end of the trip, you save half the charter costs. But then you have to deal with parking a rental car at the other end, and getting back to it. Either that or find someone who runs a shuttle, and will pick you up or drop you off. The logistics of this can be daunting, but it can be done.

    3. Use the road system. Many of the rivers already suggested are on the road system (parts of the Gulkana, the Copper, etc). This is by far your cheapest opportunity. Again, you will need to coordinate transportation. I was not previously aware that Brian Richardson offers a shuttle service, but this is something you might look into. That way you can eliminate the rental car issue for the most part (you might still need one at the front and / or back end of your trip for a day or two if you want to explore Anchorage).

    BOATS

    You are most likely going to need inflatable canoes for this trip, as you mentioned. SOAR, Incept, AIRE, Grabner, and Alaska Series canoes will all work for your purposes. Here are some connections to rental outfits you might call:

    Alaska Raft and Kayak (the largest shop in Alaska- based in Anchorage. They carry several brands. Ask for Tracey Harmon there, he's great to work with, and you can tell him I sent you!)

    Alaska Downstream (this is Jerry Sisemore's company, and he's great with his customers. Based in Anchorage, they carry SOAR and SOTAR, and perhaps others)

    Alaska Raft Connection (a new outfit in Anchorage. This is Brian Richardson's company. I know they carry SOTAR, but they have other stuff too.)

    Blue Moose Rafting (In Fairbanks, this is Richard Mousseau's outfit. They carry AIRE, NRS, and other brands.)

    Alaska Wildwater (sorry, no website right now, but the link has their contact info.) This company is owned by Goo Voght, and he has a lot of expertise with whitewater folks. I'm not positive, but he might also have boats for rent. Wouldn't hurt to look him up, and he's a great guy to work with.

    Alaska Series Inflatables. Jim King offers an entire line of inflatable canoes, but I'm not sure if he rents. Might be a good idea to contact him anyway, as he is a wealth of knowledge on rivers across the state.

    All of these companies are run by good folks with tons of experience in exactly the kind of thing you're looking for. Though they are mostly involved in the rental and retail of boats, they also do some light trip planning / advice along the way.

    OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

    You should consider renting a satellite phone for your trip; the Motorola Irridium phone has the best coverage in Alaska and can be rented from Greg Lee at Surveyor's Exchange. They have offices in Anchorage and Fairbanks. I am a commercial hunt planner and I use them for many of my clients.

    You are also going to need some camping gear for your trip, and it will most likely be cost-prohibitive for you to bring it with you from Italy. I know Jerry Sisemore at Alaska Downstream has camping gear for rent, so you might drop him a line. I have some gear available as well, so feel free to drop me a PM and we can talk about that.

    You might also consider fishing on your trip. If this is a consideration, be sure to let whomever you talk to know about that. Not all of the rivers up here offer good fishing opportunities. And of course you'll need rods and tackle. That's also something I can outfit you with if you like.

    RIVER GUIDEBOOKS & INFORMATION

    Outdoors Directory contains writeups on a number of river systems across the state. Though these writeups are somewhat dated, the information is still good and could provide a solid beginning point for you. You might find them of use. You can find them AT THIS LINK.

    You might want to pick up some reading material on rivers in Alaska. Here are some to consider:

    The Alaska River Guide by Karen Jettmar. If you only get one book, get this one. It is by far the most comprehensive.

    Paddling Alaska by Dan Maclean. A good overview of river systems across the state.

    Paddling the Yukon and its Tributaries. A good review of the Yukon River system, including the Tanana, Porcupine, Koyukuk, and parts of the Kuskokwim River.

    Float Hunting Alaska's Wild Rivers. While this is a hunting book, it offers by far the most comprehensive trip-planning section currently in print. As you can see from this post, the logistics of this trip are very involved, and you may benefit from something like this. It also includes overviews of fifty river systems across the state. I wrote this book.

    There are several other titles that offer river information, but it is mostly superficial and may not be of much use to you. Our bookstore also carries DVDs on the following rivers:


    These videos are mostly about fishing or hunting, but they do give you a pretty good representation of what the area looks like and such. You (or other readers) might find them useful.

    ANOTHER CONNECTION

    You might consider connecting with Knik Canoers and Kayakers. They're a nonprofit group of committed paddlers with experience across the entire state. They often do group trips and invite others along to share costs. If you're looking to just tag along on some really good trips, these guys can probably get you on something.

    CONCLUSIONS

    You have a lot of options, so don't get too discouraged about the budget issue. It is tight, but it can be done. Keep the questions coming, and best of luck to you!

    Take care,

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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