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Thread: Where do I get fertile soil near Glennallen???

  1. #1
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    Default Where do I get fertile soil near Glennallen???

    Just had first garden last year. Made raised beds and bought some soil in Palmer. Need a whole lot more soil and beds this year.

    First, concerning soil: anyone know where I can get good soil in the aforementioned area? Willing to pay a little but would rather find for free if possible. Willing to shovel free soil into my pickup and trailer. Anything I need to add to the soil to make it "fertile" or is it ready to plant? I am going to have plenty of compost ready, will that be all I need?

    Also will consider getting soil on my way back and forth to ANC if I can't get near my place. Any suggestions???

    Second, concerning raised beds: how deep do they need to be? I was thinking about 6-12 inches......I dunno.....I guess the deeper the better. Is there a min. depth??? What does everyone find is the best way to make all the siding with for the beds?

    Any help much appreciated.
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    Member matjpow's Avatar
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    The depth of the raised beds depends on the soil you have underneath and what you are growing. If you are not relying on the existing soil underneath, you need about 10-12" Maybe more for potatoes.

    Here's a good article on raised beds:

    http://www.dorothyainsworth.com/garden/beds.html

    I don't know where you can get good soil around Glennallen. Does the Ace Hardware have soil? If it does it might be pretty pricey. BTW have you ever been in the Ace Hardware in Glennallen? If so, how are their prices compared to Anchorage area? I have never gone into town out there when they are open.
    That's what she said...

  3. #3

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    Where do I get fertile soil near Glennallen???
    Kenny Lake.

  4. #4

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    If you want something that is good and easy to make raised beds with is guard rails like the kind along the road. Most of the time the bolt holes line up and just use rebar driven into the ground through the bolt holes. Just cut the end peices to make it as wide as wanted. Then use a long bolt through both peices to tie the corners together. They will be there for your grandkids and mabey even longer. Try the highway dept. there they might have some that they would let go. Hope this helps.

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bend View Post
    If you want something that is good and easy to make raised beds with is guard rails like the kind along the road. Most of the time the bolt holes line up and just use rebar driven into the ground through the bolt holes. Just cut the end peices to make it as wide as wanted. Then use a long bolt through both peices to tie the corners together. They will be there for your grandkids and mabey even longer. Try the highway dept. there they might have some that they would let go. Hope this helps.
    If you don't mind treated wood near your lunches......

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    There was a place on the east side of the road at the bottom of the hill that drops down into Tazlina, back in several blocks or so. Look for the area where they've been extracting gravel; the top soil is a side-line product that comes off first where ever they're digging for gravel.

    I purchased a trailer load of very nice top soil with loam and peat moss there about 16 years ago or so, though I can't claim to know if they're still selling top soil there or not.

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    There is no treated wood involved, You are just using the metal guard rails. The rebar is used to fasten them in place .

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bend View Post
    There is no treated wood involved, You are just using the metal guard rails. The rebar is used to fasten them in place .
    Sorry - I know that quite a few of the posts made it around and people need to know that they are high in copper.... at least.

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    Default ......never been to the ACE in GA......

    ......I think they are pretty **** pricey though b/c my neighbor won't even go there. He goes to Palmer or beyond and told me it is worth it. I bought a bag or two of soil from one of the chain stores years ago and I won't go that route again. I think I would need near a thousand or more dollars to get enough soil from a Lowes/ACE type store for the garden I am envisioning.

    I am envisioning at least three or more dump trucks worth, but I will take it in small steps each year. I got about two pickup truck loads last year, but I had a million other things going on. This year I am going to aim for at least 25 pickups. We'll see.......

    Thanks for all the ideas so far.
    Last edited by billhicksmostfunny; 03-11-2010 at 10:32. Reason: typo
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    As a note, the guard rails may be made of galvanized metal. If so, while valuable as scrap metal, I doubt that galvanized metal is good for ingestion once transmitted through the plants.

    I simply use rough-cut 1x's in my greenhyouse beds anymore, knowing that perhaps once every 7-10 years (depending on climate) I'll need to replace them, just as I do the spruce poles I use for raised bed supports in my main garden; they'll ALL last almost a decade, after which they simply get pulled and replaced.

    While requiring further garden labor 'down the road,' it also permits a second opportunity to decide if you liked the original bed design or location, and transmits nothing bad into your food.

  11. #11
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    You might try Tom at TMel Services. 822-3576 He has been around there for years and knows the area very well. He is a great guy. I personally don't know of a topsoil plant in that area.

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    Try O&S @ 822-3626 - Lans usually has good dirt come May, but if you've got compost to add so much the better.

    Your beds need to be at least 8" deep to insulate from the permafrost below (unless you're lucky enough not to have any).

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