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Thread: 375 ruger recoil

  1. #1
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    Default 375 ruger recoil

    Read in Chris boddingtons review of the African 375 ruger that the recoil was quite stout due to the light weight of the rifle, listed as 7 3/4 pds and the Alaskan is listed as 8 pds. Can't imagine why they would make this rifle so light......................

  2. #2
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    Default Recoil...what's that...

    His name is Craig, and for an old Marine he is a whimp when it comes to recoil.

    I have the utmost respect for the guy I have all his books and enjoy his writings very much but, I can tell from all of them he is very recoil sensitive.

    As I read the complaints and whines on this forum, I think Craig is very normal. Most of the folks who post on this forum are also very recoil sensitive.

    I don't get it! I have several rifles of 375 caliber (H&H, and faster) that weigh between 7 and 8 pounds. With only the added comfort of a recoil pad, and they are not hard to take. I can and do shoot them sitting, standing and prone.

    The 7 & 3/4#, 375 Ruger with it's advertised ballistics should be comfortable to shoot.

    Here is the solution: Learn to shoot the 30-06, correctly with the right technique, and shoot it well. Then with the 375 class of rifles, recoil will be very managable. Gunsmith's nowadays are getting rich installing muzzle brakes.

    We are such whimps! We can't carry a 9 pound rifle and we can't take the recoil of a 7 pound rifle! The solution is add more noise and weight to an otherwise normal rifle! How on earth did those old guys of yesteryear ever shoot anything bigger than a 243? I read everyday about someone getting a lovely, light weight, compact rifle then adding a pound of mercury to the stock and a two inch muzzle brake to the end.

    Another solution: Buy one 10 pound 375 for bench and practice and a 7 pound 375 for field duty. The 375 will bring down anything with one well placed shot. One shot won't hurt when shooting at fur!

    There you go! Gee I've already fixed another problem!
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  3. #3
    Member svehunter's Avatar
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    Default 375 recoil

    I have a 375H&H with a Limbsaver recoil pad,and the recoil is ok,you need to practice alot and you will get used to the recoil,simple as that...
    Dont think Craig boddington is recoil sensitve at all,i have him seen shoot a 470 nitro express double and 458 lott bolt action with no problems
    100% fairchase

  4. #4
    Member Paparock's Avatar
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    Default What Recoil?

    Murphy, I enjoyed your post. It reminded me of a question I always think of every time a new wonder magnum comes out. Where I am, I don’t need my trust old .375 H&H Mag's power any more but I love larger caliber rifles. I read gun writers comment about the .358 Winchester, .35 Whelen, .338-06 and say such things, as “they did not catch on because of their higher recoil”. Now exactly how did all the magnum calibers become so popular that have MORE recoil than these fine medium bore non-magnum cartridges if that so often re-hashed statement were true yet I see it repeatedly. Maybe some gun writers are wimps too or are they guilty of repeating what others have written without checking the validity of those statements? If someone has the want or need for a heavy magnum even if he or she wants to hunt ground squirrels with a .460 Weatherby more power to them if they shoot it that accurately. My complaint is not with magnum shooters as I have been one most of my life. What I don’t understand is for example take a look at how many different factory .338 magnum cartridges there are today (338 Lapua Mag., 338 Rem Ultra Mag., 338 Win. Mag., and .340 Weath. Mag.) and some guy writes a .338-06, .35 Whelen has too much recoil and it seems the buying public just accepts it because I hear it repeated in discussions. I know it is just people parroting back what they read trying to act as if they know what they are talking about but it really puts a burr under my saddle.

    If someone cannot or will not take, the time to learn to shoot a heavier recoiling rifle then another solution is use less gun that is if the factories would make them available. Like if you cannot handle a .375 H&H or .375 Ruger a cartridge like the .376 Steyr or 9.3X62MM would better serve a hunter if his shots were well placed than taking the chance of a wounded bear that has to be followed up if using a more powerful rifle the hunter can’t handle. The 9.3X62 MM ammo loaded by Nosler with it’s 286gr. Spitzer Partition at 2430 fps will take care of about anything you need to shoot but if American rifle makers chamber for the round then more ammo makers would offer loadings. When will rational thought ever rule the gun making world? Who knows?

  5. #5
    Member Darreld Walton's Avatar
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    Default Why, I remember way back when, it seems like it was jist yestidy...

    Back when I was a mite younger'n I am now, I got my first .35 Whelen, kind of a pretty thing it was, built on an '09 Argentine action, laminated stock, figured that I needed the thing to hunt in Montana because I sure didn't want to get et by them big old critters running around up there. First thing I did was load up a bunch of 250 Hornady's just as hot as I thought I could get away with, and me and a buddy headed out to the prairie dog town just north of Ulm, right below the pishkun. (Buffler jump, if you was wonderin').
    Made a dandy crater in the hard packed dirt where the pasture poodles had been building their homes. We had permission to go into that piece, but the owner made us swear that we'd kill at least a hundred apiece per visit. Don't recall that I ever did have a wounded one get away with that rifle and load. Had a few doubles, and a possible triple with it, too. Best shooting was prone from a shooting mat, and I don't recall that I ever had so much as a bruise from a long day. Dad told me that I oughta put lace on my knickers for using such a wimpy rig. Back during the war, they couldn't get shells, and had to resort to plugging a four inch irrigation pipe, putting a bit of gas in the end, and shooting lava rocks that they'd tamp in. Said that one would rock 'em back a mite, but it was tolerable. I ain't so sure, though, because gas was as tight as ammunition, but he is my Dad, so even if he lies about it, I'll swear to it...........

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    Member Paparock's Avatar
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    Default Right On

    Right on Darreld, I grew up in south Arkansas running the Pine Barrens and swamps with my Indian best friend. The first handgun my grandfather stuck in my hand was a Colt 1911 so by the time I went into the Army during Vietnam the range NCO was impressed. I lived in Casper, Wyoming for ten years where my wife ran a restaurant and I worked the oil refinery so we were not too far apart, small world. Good hunting!

  7. #7
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    Smile Amen Murph

    I worked in a gun shop for two years and can't tell you the number of guys that came in to buy a rifle and the first question is how much recoil! And a lot of them were not small guys by any means. The point Murph made about learning to shoot an 06 correctly is a very good idea. I was brought up on an 06 and now my favorite rifle to shoot is my Ruger M77 .338 wm.

  8. #8
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    Default Closer than you might imagine!

    I grew up in southeast Idaho, spent six years at Malmstrom AFB at Great Falls, then from 1985 to 1991, worked the missile field at FE Warren there at Cheyenne! My first handgun was a brand spanking new Colt Trooper Mk III that I bought with my summer's wages. The shop where I bought it let me take the 4473 home, my Mother filled it out and signed it, took it back, and I took the piece home. Got a box of WW Super-X 158 gr Lubaloy ammunition with the thing, but no warning about hearing protection.....That was 35 years ago, and my ears still ain't quit ringing!

  9. #9
    Member Paparock's Avatar
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    Default 03a3

    Yep, I still shoot my grandfathers custom 03A3 .30-06. If you can’t shoot a 06 strait there is no sense going any bigger.

  10. #10

    Talking

    IMO,
    Most anyone can get used to the recoil up to that recoil level with a little pratice. I'm 5'8" about 160# and putting a couple of boxes of .375 through a sako doesnt bother me except for the cost. My self imposed limit was met when I custom built a pre 64 win in 416 taylor in a 6# rifle. I was whining once to my hunting optomitrist that shooting the rifle made my eyes blur for a second or two after firing. He looked at me funny and said if I was you I would stop as what it was doing was causing my retinas to try and detach. So I got rid of it. It probably would have been ok if I would have made it heavier. I think you just need to practice and have the right scope with enough eye relief to give you the confidence. I have to confess that I use a recoil shoulder pad at the range though sighting in and for practice. don't even begin to notice it hunting.
    goldbelt

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    Default Wimps is an understatement little old ladies

    Such big shots it's ok to shoot little Bambi but to wimpish to take a little recoil. I have a ruger 375 Alaskan and the recoil is very manageable yes all heavier calibres are at ad harsh on the bench,I say suck it up and stop being like a little fairy.
    your opinion is great .good to see there is at least two men in the world ,you and me. The rest should take up knitting.






    UOTE=Murphy;52601]His name is Craig, and for an old Marine he is a whimp when it comes to recoil.

    I have the utmost respect for the guy I have all his books and enjoy his writings very much but, I can tell from all of them he is very recoil sensitive.

    As I read the complaints and whines on this forum, I think Craig is very normal. Most of the folks who post on this forum are also very recoil sensitive.

    I don't get it! I have several rifles of 375 caliber (H&H, and faster) that weigh between 7 and 8 pounds. With only the added comfort of a recoil pad, and they are not hard to take. I can and do shoot them sitting, standing and prone.

    The 7 & 3/4#, 375 Ruger with it's advertised ballistics should be comfortable to shoot.

    Here is the solution: Learn to shoot the 30-06, correctly with the right technique, and shoot it well. Then with the 375 class of rifles, recoil will be very managable. Gunsmith's nowadays are getting rich installing muzzle brakes.

    We are such whimps! We can't carry a 9 pound rifle and we can't take the recoil of a 7 pound rifle! The solution is add more noise and weight to an otherwise normal rifle! How on earth did those old guys of yesteryear ever shoot anything bigger than a 243? I read everyday about someone getting a lovely, light weight, compact rifle then adding a pound of mercury to the stock and a two inch muzzle brake to the end.

    Another solution: Buy one 10 pound 375 for bench and practice and a 7 pound 375 for field duty. The 375 will bring down anything with one well placed shot. One shot won't hurt when shooting at fur!

    There you go! Gee I've already fixed another problem![/QUOTE]

  12. #12
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    Default

    Such big shots it's ok to shoot little Bambi but to wimpish to take a little recoil. I have a ruger 375 Alaskan and the recoil is very manageable yes all heavier calibres are at ad harsh on the bench,I say suck it up and stop being like a little fairy.
    your opinion is great .good to see there is at least two men in the world ,you and me. The rest should take up knitting.

  13. #13
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    Default

    Maybe it's just me, but the older I get the less I like being smacked around by a gun. I can still take the recoil for awhile...I just don't want to anymore and when a nice '06 or .308 will do the job I will use that and not a .300 Weatherby. I've gone from a 12ga to a 20ga or 28ga and I still kill birds just fine...just not quite so far away and in the last 10 years my bows have gone from 65lbs to 50lbs and I still get shoot-thrus on whitetail and they are just as dead as they used to be.

    I'd bet a .338 Fed or a .358 Win will kill just as well as a .340 W or .358 Norma with the right bullet in the right spot....now back to my knitting.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  14. #14
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    Default

    I have a 375 Ruger Alaskan. I bought it at the advice of a friend who also advised me to off load the plastic stock and bed it into a good Mc Millan stock. The stock came with a de-cellerator pad installed, I never shot it before the new stock was installed. It is my first 375, though I have hunted with the H&H and a 458 Win before. It doesn't hurt, it just seems to give a shove, it's compact and easy to carry and I can shoot it as well as my 300 mag. I took it to Africa a couple years back and took a cape buffalo and a half dozen different large antelope. It was so mild and comfortable to shoot the though of recoil was never in my mind. That's the way it works for me. Someone asked me the other day about recoil and how does it shoot. I just told them I don't notice the recoil and I have no idea what kind of group it can shoot. I've probably shot it 200 rounds, mostly 300 grain loads, before my first hunt but never from a bench. I sighted it in at 200 yards sitting on the ground, elbows to knees and kept shot about 4". I've never missed anything with the rifle. I took a very big elk with it at about 200 yards last fall. Recoil? What recoil?
    Mike
    _______________________________________
    "The rifle brought man out of the mud". Cooper

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    Default

    OK, I get it big guns kick little ones don't. Or do they. I have as an example, two Remington 700 308's. As far as I can tell they identical. Can't see any difference in weight on the kitchen scale. Shoot the same load through both and I promise you will really notice a big difference in recoil. Now if a little 308 can be so different in two different guns would that difference not multiply exponentially moving up to say a 30-06, 338-06 338 win mag, 375 what ever name. And while folks are at it why does one of my 308's recoil so much differently?

  16. #16
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    Default

    thunder,

    I got an African the 1st year they came out. I have several 06s and find that the African is comparible when it comes to recoil. Unlike the 7s, 30s, and 338s which have a sharp jolt, I think the 375 has more push. That being said, it does still have a pretty good thump, but it is a big bullet traveling at 2700 plus feet per second. I have had my Ruger African bedded and the trigger worked and pulls at 2.5 lbs. My son doesn't like shooting it, but he shoots a 30/06 and doesn't like the recoil of it either. The factory recoil pad on the African is pretty good, but if the recoil is still too much, I recommend getting an aftermarket Decelerator and maybe having the muzzle ported, or get a smaller or heavier rifle. You could inlay a lead bar in the fore end to reduce recoil as well.
    “Don't expect to build up the weak by pulling down the strong." ~Calvin Coolidge~

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