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Thread: Hunting clothes

  1. #1
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    Default Hunting clothes

    Hello all! I'm looking for opinions for a hunting trip. I figure you Alaskin's would know better than anyone. Does anyone still hunt in duck jeans or Carhartt type material. Or is everything now the space age moisture wicking clothing. The trip is going to be in May to New Zealand. Temps in the high 20's -50's. I know its not AK.I'm on a tight budget. I have good boots rain gear and termals. I need some good pants BDU style but everything I've looked at is cotton. I want a durable material. I know layering is the way to go. I'm from Michigan all my hunting cloths that I have are carhartt wool and cotton flannel. May see alittle snow rain and Fall weather conditions. I'm about as green as it gets when it comes to real wilderness so go easy on me. I also know I should just ask my guide. Looking for suggestions. Thanks for your time.

  2. #2

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    IMO wool can't be beat for damp conditions.

  3. #3
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default New Zealand???

    If the hunting and weather conditions in New Zealand are similar to Alaska, then.....

    ....Cearly, synthetic insulation in your sleeping bag as well as synthetic clothing fabrics are the way to go. I only have one little addition bit of information about hunting in the bush...

    Unless you are at a lodge with a great heating system, your damp down sleeping bag or cotton clothing will never completely dry out in a bush or spike camp. Every rain drop, every wet collar or shirt sleeve, and every sweat molecule of water never really evaporates out or either down insulation or cotton fabrics. And the air is often rather heavy with mist, fog, and humidity. So, when the occasional client hunter shows up in an Alaskan guide camp with a down insulated sleeping bag or cotton levis or carharts, then he gets to sleep damp, and wear damp pants for a week.

    Keep in mind that your BDUs are cotton, either 100% or 50% (??), depending on summer or winter style. And the older ones, the jungle camo, are really dark. Here in AK, I can spot a hunter wearing jungle camo BDUs at four miles! My first thought is always...."Is that a black bear?" Then, "Nope, just another hunter wearing them old dark BDUs."

    All the stuff you wear or sleep in really should be synthetic.

    Dennis

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    Default Shadow camo.

    I guess I should have looked at the other thread on cloths. Thanks for the info on cotton & own. Any thoughts on the Kings shadow camo. 100% ployester rip stop?

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    Member oldakcop's Avatar
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    Default Hunting Clothing

    Well SKU078, In my humble opinion, the answer is LAYERS. If you are looking to outfit yourself on a budget, look into polypro long underwear and polypro socks. Then layer with wool socks and fleece mid layers. Cover with a wool sweater ( if it's really cold ) then use a good quality waterproof layer. Here's where you don't want to skimp on quality. However, you can find some decent waterproof fleece rain gear by companies such as Sterns ( under the name Mad Dog ) or in Cabela's that won't break the bank, but you'll have to shop around. ( I have no experience with Kings camo and cannot comment on it. ) Finish the package with good boots. You'll find that most leather boots with a waterproof lining will serve the purpose well, but I'm partial to my LaCrosse Alpha knee high rubber boots when in areas that are wet and cold. They are like wearing a pair of tennis shoes and are truly waterproof since they're made of rubber, warm because of the insulation, and light weight. Wet feet will be the ultimate fun killer!
    You'll probably be able to set yourself up with the above for about $400.00 total. That of course depends on the quality and brand names you buy. Of course, nothing is better than wool for keeping warm, even when wet, but you'll spend $400.00+ on just wool pants and a wool jacket.
    Buy a good quality synthetic sleeping bag that will be good to 0 degrees and put a fleece liner in it. It's better to have a bag that is too warm ( NO SUCH THING! ) that you can open up and vent if you need to, than to try and sleep cold.
    Good luck in New Zealand and be sure to post some pictures!

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    Default

    We have a saying here in Alaska.... "Cotton Kills"

    Ditch the Carharts and flannel and go synthetic or wool. But, wool is heavy when wet. May not matter though if you're back to a warm place every nght with a heat source to dry out. But, on a backpacking type hunt. My woolies stay home. With one exception. Wool/poly blend is a nice combo in some stuff.

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Default

    Synthetics or wool. Personally I only use wool for base layers. Again "cotton kills"! Since you're hunting NZ I would imagine you will be staying at a lodge or some sort of housing as opposed to wilderness camping. That will give you some serious latitude as far as clothing selection as you can go back and dry out at night. I would look into some serious light weight, breathable, wicking, and warm synthetics as the mountains of NZ probably aren't any easier than anywhere else. Westcomb syncro and mammut champ pants would be hard to beat. Synthetic tops like those made by sporthill would be good.

    Brett

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    Thanks everyone for your replies. I will take the advice of layering and synthetics along with some wool I already own. We are staying in a Hut on the Volcanic Plataeu,centeral North Island. Hut = shack in the woods.It should be a great time. I'll leave the down at home also. Thanks again.
    Sku

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    Default Medalist

    Any thoughts on medalist chothing with silvermax.

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    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
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    I've had the same Medalist Silvermax long sleeve shirt for almost three years. I can't think of one hunt I've been on that I wasn't wearing it. The Silvermax is effective. Very little odor after eight days of sheep hunting. No odor on two or three day hunts. Quick drying. The price is half of Sitka and other Silvermax or antimicrobial clothing.

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    Cabela's Has the cheyanne pants and shirt on sale for 29.95

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    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by sku078 View Post
    I guess I should have looked at the other thread on cloths. Thanks for the info on cotton & own. Any thoughts on the Kings shadow camo. 100% ployester rip stop?
    I bought a pair of these pants last year and have been really impressed with them. Wore them on a sheep and goat hunt with no complaints. Tough material, sheds water fairly well and dries fast, affordable.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  13. #13
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Thumbs up kings Desert Camo...

    sku078,

    The Kings Desert Camo pattern will be very perfect for both tundra hunts and sheep up in the rocks here in Alaska.....if it is a synthetic/polyester fabric.

    dennis

  14. #14

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    My Medalist stuff smells less bad after 4-5 days than my sitka in 1 day. Picked up some Smartwool, -33, and other wool to try

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